Guantanamo prisoners savagely beaten

EilonwyEilonwy Posts: 12,389Registered Users
This is torture.











LOL just kidding, they're brown people! Ugh one of them, his last name is Mohamed, it makes me sick. F*ck that guy...

Comments

  • ScarletScarlet Posts: 3,125Registered Users
    Is this the guy who plotted with Jose Padilla, fought with the Taliban, discussed cyanide attacks, and was flying all over the world on at least 4 phony passports?
    The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics - Thomas Sowell
  • Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
    If the guy did those things, then why hasn't he been tried and sentenced to death? I don't understand just housing, feeding, clothing and taking care of his needs forever.
  • battinlashbattinlash Posts: 1,850Registered Users
    I don't think you guys are understanding the whole situation. Torture is torture no matter how much YOU think a person deserves it. We're Americans, we're supposed to be a civilized society with a government that abides by the Geneva convention. There's no excuse.

    Here is an excerpt from Benyam's diary that describes some of the torture he was subjected to. It goes beyond hunger strikes.
    They cut off my clothes with some kind of doctor's scalpel. I was naked. I tried to put on a brave face. But maybe I was going to be raped. Maybe they'd electrocute me. Maybe castrate me.

    They took the scalpel to my right chest. It was only a small cut. Maybe an inch. At first I just screamed ... I was just shocked, I wasn't expecting ... Then they cut my left chest. This time I didn't want to scream because I knew it was coming.


    One of them took my penis in his hand and began to make cuts. He did it once, and they stood still for maybe a minute, watching my reaction. I was in agony. They must have done this 20 to 30 times, in maybe two hours. There was blood all over. "I told you I was going to teach you who's the man," [one] eventually said.

    They cut all over my private parts. One of them said it would be better just to cut it off, as I would only breed terrorists. I asked for a doctor.


    Doctor No 1 carried a briefcase. "You're all right, aren't you? But I'm going to say a prayer for you." Doctor No 2 gave me an Alka-Seltzer for the pain. I told him about my penis. "I need to see it. How did this happen?" I told him. He looked like it was just another patient. "Put this cream on it two times a day. Morning and night." He gave me some kind of antibiotic.


    I was in Morocco for 18 months. Once they began this, they would do it to me about once a month. One time I asked a guard: "What's the point of this? I've got nothing I can say to them. I've told them everything I possibly could."


    "As far as I know, it's just to degrade you. So when you leave here, you'll have these scars and you'll never forget. So you'll always fear doing anything but what the US wants."


    Later, when a US airplane picked me up the following January, a female MP took pictures. She was one of the few Americans who ever showed me any sympathy. When she saw the injuries I had she gasped. They treated me and took more photos when I was in Kabul. Someone told me this was "to show Washington it's healing".


    But in Morocco, there were even worse things. Too horrible to remember, let alone talk about. About once a week or even once every two weeks I would be taken for interrogation, where they would tell me what to say. They said if you say this story as we read it, you will just go to court as a witness and all this torture will stop. I eventually repeated what was read out to me.


    When I got to Morocco they said some big people in al-Qaida were talking about me. They talked about Jose Padilla and they said I was going to testify against him and big people. They named Khalid Sheikh Mohamed, Abu Zubaidah and Ibn Sheikh al-Libi [all senior al-Qaida leaders who are now in US custody]. It was hard to pin down the exact story because what they wanted changed from Morocco to when later I was in the Dark Prison [a detention centre in Kabul with windowless cells and American staff], to Bagram and again in Guantánamo Bay.
    They told me that I must plead guilty. I'd have to say I was an al-Qaida operations man, an ideas man. I kept insisting that I had only been in Afghanistan a short while. "We don't care," was all they'd say.
    I was also questioned about my links with Britain. The interrogator told me: "We have photos of people given to us by MI5. Do you know these?" I realised that the British were sending questions to the Moroccans. I was at first surprised that the Brits were siding with the Americans.


    On August 6, I thought I was going to be transferred out of there [the prison]. They came in and cuffed my hands behind my back.


    But then three men came in with black masks. It seemed to go on for hours. I was in so much pain I'd fall to my knees. They'd pull me back up and hit me again. They'd kick me in my thighs as I got up. I vomited within the first few punches. I really didn't speak at all though. I didn't have the energy or will to say anything. I just wanted for it to end. After that, there was to be no more first-class treatment. No bathroom. No food for a while.


    During September-October 2002, I was taken in a car to another place. The room was bigger, it had its own toilet, and a window which was opaque.


    They gave me a toothbrush and Colgate toothpaste. I was allowed to recover from the scalpel for about two weeks, and the guards said nothing about it.
    Then they cuffed me and put earphones on my head. They played hip-hop and rock music, very loud. I remember they played Meat Loaf and Aerosmith over and over. A couple of days later they did the same thing. Same music.


    For 18 months, there was not one night when I could sleep well. Sometimes I would go 48 hours without sleep. At night, they would bang the metal doors, bang the flap on the door, or just come right in.
    They continued with two or three interrogations a month. They weren't really interrogations, more like training me what to say. The interrogator told me what was going on. "We're going to change your brain," he said.


    I suffered the razor treatment about once a month for the remaining time I was in Morocco, even after I'd agreed to confess to whatever they wanted to hear. It became like a routine. They'd come in, tie me up, spend maybe an hour doing it. They never spoke to me. Then they'd tip some kind of liquid on me - the burning was like grasping a hot coal. The cutting, that was one kind of pain. The burning, that was another.
    In all the 18 months I was there, I never went outside. I never saw the sun, not even once. I never saw any human being except the guards and my tormentors, unless you count the pictures they showed me.


    Benyam has confessed to numerous crimes as a result of the torture he's undergone; however, there's no real evidence to charge him with anything. The US dropped the charges against him when military tribunals were barred. I have no idea why we're still holding him. In fact, Britain wants him extradited. How can anyone not see the injustice here?
  • PoodleheadPoodlehead Posts: 6,959Registered Users
    You do realize Eilonwy was saying it tongue-in-cheek, don't you? As for the others, hm.
    Minneapolis, MN
  • susancnwsusancnw Posts: 1,366Registered Users
    Hmmm. Think Benyam has an agenda? Any sort of verification of it?

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FInside-Gitmo-Story-Behind-Guantanamo%2Fdp%2F006176230X%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fie%3DUTF8%26amp%3Bs%3Dbooks%26amp%3Bqid%3D1234501557%26amp%3Bsr%3D1-1" class="Popup

    Remember, the detainees there are housed under better circumstances than they have ever had in real life, better medical and dental care, better food than our military there gets. They throw feces, etc at our soldiers, who are not allowed to respond. We handle that Koran literally with cotton gloves (I'm leaning towards pigskin gloves personally).

    We do need to get them tried and outta there or sentenced. There is that little problem of about 10% of the released prisoners are going back to the battlefield. Our illustrious governor has decided it's a good idea to close Gitmo and has offered our Supermax prison to hold them. Thank you so much Guv...I'd love to have them in my back yard. I don't have any concern about them getting out, I do have concerns about their buddies.
    My son wears combat boots (and a parachute). So does my son-in-law.
    The older I get, the less patience I have with cleverness. Thomas Sowell.
    Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve. Benjamin Franklin.
    Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first. Mark Twain.

    s-event.png

  • susancnwsusancnw Posts: 1,366Registered Users
    My son wears combat boots (and a parachute). So does my son-in-law.
    The older I get, the less patience I have with cleverness. Thomas Sowell.
    Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve. Benjamin Franklin.
    Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first. Mark Twain.

    s-event.png

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