Straight Hair Privelege

curlylifestylecurlylifestyle Posts: 77Registered Users
Hi guys,

I'm Toella and I wrote the article "Does Straight Hair Privilege Exist in America." I saw a lot of people commenting but I'd like to extend the conversation to CurlTalk. Do you guys agree? Do you think it isn't that big of a deal and people are saying too many people have different types of privilege? I'd like to hear from you guys! Thanks so much!!:bounce:
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Comments

  • tengoRizostengoRizos Posts: 195Registered Users
    While it is an interesting idea, I think it is stemmed from sexism and judging a woman on her looks. It also could be involved in racism as straight blond hair is seen as white and curls are often (not always though) seen in multiracial women. Just my 2 cents
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  • BotticelliBritBotticelliBrit Curl Neophyte Posts: 2,075Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    So you mean straight-haired people getting more 'benefits' and curly folks being a bit discriminated against?

    If so, I'm not sure. I don't know what it's like in other countries, but in the UK I don't really think hair makes a difference. I have read some stories about schools discriminating against natural hair, but to my knowledge those schools weren't in the UK.

    So yeah, in my experience it's never been an issue. But I do think situations where it could be an issue would be down to racism. I can imagine a lot of the cases that do occur would be regarding black or multi-racial folks, rather than Caucasian people with curls.
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  • geekrockgirl85geekrockgirl85 Posts: 170Registered Users
    It definitely exists as a social stratification. Throughout school I had very few female friends, because I was condemned for "not caring" about my appearance enough to straighten my hair and look like a "normal person". I got a lot more positive attention from both friends and potential romantic interests when I gave in and started flat ironing.

    I also attended school with a girl who had natural blonde hair and a 4a curl pattern, and she was the subject of a lot of racism-based taunting until she began getting chemical relaxers to fit in.

    I don't think my curls have ever affected me getting a job, but they've definitely had an impact on the social circles I am welcome in, which may by extension change the jobs available to me through networking.I also tend to feel obligated to put my hair up and out of the way when going on interviews, which I never really thought of, but maybe I'm subconsciously minimizing the visibility of my curls?
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  • claudine191claudine191 Curl Connoisseur Posts: 8,221Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I think it is an issue. Curls are perceived as ethnic, "funky," different and sometimes ugly. I received the most positive feedback when I straightened out my waves. In fact, I still get grief from stylists complaining about my Type 2 hair: "If only you had waves by your crown!" or "Maybe you should just straighten the whole thing so you at least match."

    I also don't think it's a subject that affects only women; why else would Justin Timberlake have straightened?
  • CurlyShorty3405CurlyShorty3405 Posts: 196Registered Users
    It definitely exists as a social stratification. Throughout school I had very few female friends, because I was condemned for "not caring" about my appearance enough to straighten my hair and look like a "normal person". I got a lot more positive attention from both friends and potential romantic interests when I gave in and started flat ironing.

    I also attended school with a girl who had natural blonde hair and a 4a curl pattern, and she was the subject of a lot of racism-based taunting until she began getting chemical relaxers to fit in.

    I don't think my curls have ever affected me getting a job, but they've definitely had an impact on the social circles I am welcome in, which may by extension change the jobs available to me through networking.I also tend to feel obligated to put my hair up and out of the way when going on interviews, which I never really thought of, but maybe I'm subconsciously minimizing the visibility of my curls?

    I went through the same thing you did in school. I got my hair chemically straightened and one of the girls I couldn't stand, who goes to the same salon as me went to the salon and asked what they did to my hair and said how good it looked. The girl didn't say it to my face, but said it to the girls at the salon. A lot of girls I went to school with had curly hair and wore it curly but they were accepted more because they were popular.
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  • curlylifestylecurlylifestyle Posts: 77Registered Users
    That Justin Timberlake comment was interesting, I never thought of that. I quickly google searched "Justin Timberlake Curly Hair" and I saw this BuzzFeed article which is epic. http://www.buzzfeed.com/mjs538/wtf-is-going-on-with-justin-timberlakes-hair
  • XhexaniaXhexania Posts: 65Registered Users
    Justin is honestly so much more attractive with curly hair, though he probably should stay away from that Ramen Noodle look. His natural texture makes him interesting in a way that some other contemporary performers aren't.
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  • wavypenwavypen Curl Neophyte Posts: 253Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    It might be interesting to consider the idea of straight hair privilege along side the ideas of "good hair" and "bad hair", which are of course tied up with racism (as is straight hair privilege I suspect, though likely in a less obvious way).
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I am back and forth on the idea of straight hair privilege. There have absolutely been instances where people have been discriminated against for their type and styles. I tend to think that boils down to prejudices and people being uptight. I am sorry but protective hair styles, natural hair, a shaved head, or green hair are not going to keep other students from learning. That is bull, and it is people trying to force their preferences on others.

    I know some news sources also did investigative pieces where women with curly hair and women with straight hair applied for jobs. Regardless of race, the women with waves or curls were said to look less professional. Again, I think a lot of that is preference and large stick inserted in ... I can't help but think the same thing would not have been said, on such a large scale, in the 80's. I have mentioned this in other threads but (and this is absolute prejudice aside) I do believe trends also play a part in this. Perms and big curly hair were very popular in the 70's and 80's. Many women (and men) with straight hair were getting perms because curls were the most desired look. Several people still rocked and loved their straight hair and that was great too! Then things took a sharp turn toward straight hair only. I personally only heard positive remarks about my hair until 5 years ago. I had 2 people make remarks about straight hair being the most beautiful and that I should straighten my hair more. They were both younger and heavily influenced by trends. In these cases one might call it false or delusional straight hair privilege. It's fleeting and truly non existent.

    So, in some cases yes it does or may exist. In others, it's simply a delusion.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    PS... I truly have no idea why uniformity became a trend. How boring can you be?
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • JessiiLeighhJessiiLeighh Posts: 195Registered Users
    I think that people see straight hair as polished and professional. It also carries the assumption that the person cares enough about their appearance to do all of that work.

    I don't know that there is much discrimination when it comes to curls that are taken care of, but more so when they are frizzy and not cooperating. When I started to take care of my hair, everyone went wild. People would compliment me and say "if I had curls like that, I wouldn't straighten my hair anymore!". On the contrary, when my hair was a mess and I started straightening, I got a lot of complements as well.

    Curls are always assumed to belong to "ethnic" individuals. Everyone verbally assumes that I'm mixed race, latin american, or jewish. I am none of the above, but my curls apparently paint the illusion that I'm not white. I actually met a girl at my college orientation who complained to me about how many white people were around, as if my curly hair clearly made me another race.

    I think people mainly discriminate those with type 4 hair because it is unknown to them and so different than their own. Also because some people don't know how to take care of their coils and they can get matted. My closest friend relaxed her 4a hair, then stopped, but added straight glue in extensions. She never washes or brushes her hair no matter how much she sweats, and loads it up with silicone based oil serums multiple times a day. It honestly looks like a greasy rats nest, which isn't cute to anyone, regardless of their own hair type. Not everyone lets their hair get this out of control, but it definitely affects people's assumptions of curls.
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  • BluebloodBlueblood Curl Neophyte Posts: 1,748Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    How many presenters of factual programs and news anchors do you have with curly hair on US TV?

    In the UK we have always had a few both men and women, and one of the women wasn't White. There were always more comments on her skin colour than her hair. This means curly hair isn't regarded as unprofessional.

    If the media doesn't allow people on TV regardless of ethnic background to have curly hair then the general population is going to regard it as unprofessional.

    I remember when a TV presenter came on a very popular program wearing braid extensions. Suddenly it became OK for professional Black women who worked in all areas to wear them. Until then only if you worked in certain industries was it acceptable due to the fights that had happened in the 1980's. Then some companies where threatened with legal action as they refused to employ Black people in public facing jobs. Some then hired prominently non-White staff in certain places to avoid this and the staff had a range of hair styles.

    So it's a vicious circle as until enough people in the general US population wear their hair curly then TV producers won't accepted it's an OK "fashion" and so TV presenters and anchor people will not wear their hair curly in order to keep their jobs. This in turn means other people especially employers won't accept curly hair as being professional.
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    ^ One would think the salons and stylists who work on news anchors would like to show a little more diversity in their work. I watch some of the larger news networks and laugh because everyone looks like a pageant contestant (exactly the same even with differences in length and color) and the stylists/salon who get an honorable mention at the end of the program comes across as a one trick pony.

    *Same with the thread someone posted a couple months ago about popular haircuts for professional/powerful women. It's basically the exact same thing with slight differences in color and length. Uniformity...

    That said, I think the majority of your average Janes and Joes could care less about the hair on a persons head. They are the ones not commenting so it seems otherwise.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I don't know what to tell anyone about the crap kids say in school. Kids have always found things to pick on someone for. If it's not hair, it's glasses. If it's not glasses, it's your height. So on and so forth.

    When I was in school I never heard people tell others to straighten their hair and be like everyone else. *Or to get a perm and be like everyone else for that matter. One more ETA: Some of my earliest memories of hair product adds were campaigns for Wella Balsam in magazines (and Prell on tv. The commercial stuck with you :). I posted a few of those in SIIDY a while back. That or Apple Pectin were my moms brands of choice. WB showed how the shampoo and conditioners worked for natural, permed, straight, etc hair. Several different people were featured, men and women. Good universal add, and back to it** It was a free for all. Do whatever you want with your hair, but we didn't have numerous commercials on main stream tv showing any type of texture as unruly hair that needed to be tamed and straightened either. That became a big push in the later 90's, going into 2000's. Hair products changed a lot during that time as well.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Morgan_AdcockMorgan_Adcock Curl Neophyte Posts: 2,573Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    It wasn't an issue until non-lye straighteners came along, and flat irons were invented. Once there was a product, they used social pressure to create a market.
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  • wavypenwavypen Curl Neophyte Posts: 253Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Blueblood wrote: »
    How many presenters of factual programs and news anchors do you have with curly hair on US TV?

    It's interesting that you just posted this a few days ago, I didn't see this, because I don't watch this program, I only saw news about it after, but a morning show host (who isn't white) just wore her hair natural in the US: Tamron Hall. All the coverage I've seen has been positive, although I'm sure if one went searching one could find criticism, and I'm sure some of the positive stuff has weird stereotypes or ideas, but this is a big change, especially after the anti-natural hair army rules earlier this year.
  • BluebloodBlueblood Curl Neophyte Posts: 1,748Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    @wavypen It needs more like her plus curly haired men to do the same.
  • wavypenwavypen Curl Neophyte Posts: 253Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Blueblood, I know we need more for things to really change, but it has to start with someone, and I'm encouraged by the positive response she's getting, maybe more people will try it because of that positive response.
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    It wasn't an issue until non-lye straighteners came along, and flat irons were invented. Once there was a product, they used social pressure to create a market.

    ^ That they did. I can remember the first flat irons that really started hitting store shelves in the 80's. I still have mine. It came with 3 interchangeable plates. Straight, wave or crimp. People got it for the crimp and that thing never got hot enough to straighten hair. Styling tools really progressed over the following 20 years.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • adthomasadthomas Curl Neophyte Posts: 5,525Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Blueblood wrote: »
    How many presenters of factual programs and news anchors do you have with curly hair on US TV?

    In the UK we have always had a few both men and women, and one of the women wasn't White. There were always more comments on her skin colour than her hair. This means curly hair isn't regarded as unprofessional.

    If the media doesn't allow people on TV regardless of ethnic background to have curly hair then the general population is going to regard it as unprofessional.

    I remember when a TV presenter came on a very popular program wearing braid extensions. Suddenly it became OK for professional Black women who worked in all areas to wear them. Until then only if you worked in certain industries was it acceptable due to the fights that had happened in the 1980's. Then some companies where threatened with legal action as they refused to employ Black people in public facing jobs. Some then hired prominently non-White staff in certain places to avoid this and the staff had a range of hair styles.

    So it's a vicious circle as until enough people in the general US population wear their hair curly then TV producers won't accepted it's an OK "fashion" and so TV presenters and anchor people will not wear their hair curly in order to keep their jobs. This in turn means other people especially employers won't accept curly hair as being professional.

    I only see a lot of curly hair on the news when they are reporting in a rain storm. Most curly media people I know straighten regardless of race.
    I can think of about five black curlies off the top of my head. The thing is they are in different local markets so unless you live in that region you wouldn't know it. There are likely more I don't know. Actually a lot of reporters and anchors wear weave or wigs. That's why Tamrom created the buzz. Melissa Harris on CNN wears braids. Funny thing is for a long time I was familiar with her husband as he is a community activist but had never heard of her.

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  • chupiechupie Curl Connoisseur Posts: 5,280Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I don't know about priveledge and I suspect I would not be in a position to address that but it's annoyingly pushed. Back when I was still coloring my hair, I used to bring products to style it wavy and without cones. One time my stylist asked "do you ever flat iron"? And I said no, and she said "Oh." in a very disappointed tone. And anytime I have my hair trimmed except with the one Deva gal they reach for that iron in double time. It annoys me. It's so automatic and wearing your hair with your own pattern is met with some disappointment. Kind of like tsk tsk. A lot.
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  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    adthomas wrote: »
    Blueblood wrote: »
    How many presenters of factual programs and news anchors do you have with curly hair on US TV?

    In the UK we have always had a few both men and women, and one of the women wasn't White. There were always more comments on her skin colour than her hair. This means curly hair isn't regarded as unprofessional.

    If the media doesn't allow people on TV regardless of ethnic background to have curly hair then the general population is going to regard it as unprofessional.

    I remember when a TV presenter came on a very popular program wearing braid extensions. Suddenly it became OK for professional Black women who worked in all areas to wear them. Until then only if you worked in certain industries was it acceptable due to the fights that had happened in the 1980's. Then some companies where threatened with legal action as they refused to employ Black people in public facing jobs. Some then hired prominently non-White staff in certain places to avoid this and the staff had a range of hair styles.

    So it's a vicious circle as until enough people in the general US population wear their hair curly then TV producers won't accepted it's an OK "fashion" and so TV presenters and anchor people will not wear their hair curly in order to keep their jobs. This in turn means other people especially employers won't accept curly hair as being professional.

    I only see a lot of curly hair on the news when they are reporting in a rain storm. Most regardless curly media people I know straighten regardless of race.
    I can think of about five black curlies off the top of my head. The thing is they are in different local markets so unless you live in that region you wouldn't know it. There are likely more I don't know. Actually a lot of reporters and anchors wear weave or wigs. That's why Tamrom created the buzz. Melissa Harris on CNN wears braids. Funny thing is for a long time I was familiar with her husband as he is a community activist but had never heard of her.

    Reporter Goes Natural, Ratings Go Up | Curly Nikki | Natural Hair Styles and Natural Hair Care


    News Anchor Pam McKelvy Gets Emotional After Revealing her Natural Hair Postchemo | BCNN1 – Black Christian News Network

    I can think of more natural women on my local programs as opposed to national. North and South Carolina PBS spotlight programs and fund raisers are loaded with natural ladies.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • chupiechupie Curl Connoisseur Posts: 5,280Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Fifi.G wrote: »
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.

    One of the reasons I was unaware of the straight hair issue until recently was one of my best friends in elementary school was black and she wore her hair natural as did her mom and dad and there were no other black kids at school and in college where I had a lot of black schoolmates from Chicago and New Jersey, most wore their hair natural. I can only remember one girl who straightened and colored her hair. So I did not at all realize how there seems to be a majority of women who relax their hair from an early age.
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  • adthomasadthomas Curl Neophyte Posts: 5,525Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    chupie wrote: »
    Fifi.G wrote: »
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.

    One of the reasons I was unaware of the straight hair issue until recently was one of my best friends in elementary school was black and she wore her hair natural as did her mom and dad and there were no other black kids at school and in college where I had a lot of black schoolmates from Chicago and New Jersey, most wore their hair natural. I can only remember one girl who straightened and colored her hair. So I did not at all realize how there seems to be a majority of women who relax their hair from an early age.

    I'm sure where you live plays a part. Although I didn't have natural hair I saw more of it as a child when I lived on the West Coast versus the South. I found people in the south to be more concerned about hair, nails clothing or just beaty overall. Some people see it as a right of passage for growing up..Also there are some homes were relaxers are forbidden. Curly Nikki's parents for example. I think there is also a generational component. All but one of my grandmothers and great grandmothers never used chemicals but only one ( my avatar) wore her hair curly. The rest were pressed. So technically they were natural. But my first cousin texlaxed her kids at 4 and 6. The older girl has courser hair so it doesn't seem to have caused as much damage. it is waist length but dry. the younger girl's ponytail is so thin it's barely hanging on.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • chupiechupie Curl Connoisseur Posts: 5,280Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    adthomas wrote: »
    chupie wrote: »
    Fifi.G wrote: »
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.

    One of the reasons I was unaware of the straight hair issue until recently was one of my best friends in elementary school was black and she wore her hair natural as did her mom and dad and there were no other black kids at school and in college where I had a lot of black schoolmates from Chicago and New Jersey, most wore their hair natural. I can only remember one girl who straightened and colored her hair. So I did not at all realize how there seems to be a majority of women who relax their hair from an early age.

    I'm sure where you live plays a part. Although I didn't have natural hair I saw more of it as a child when I lived on the West Coast versus the South. I found people in the south to be more concerned about hair, nails clothing or just beaty overall. Some people see it as a right of passage for growing up..Also there are some homes were relaxers are forbidden. Curly Nikki's parents for example. I think there is also a generational component. All but one of my grandmothers and great grandmothers never used chemicals but only one ( my avatar) wore her hair curly. The rest were pressed. So technically they were natural. But my first cousin texlaxed her kids at 4 and 6. The older girl has courser hair so it doesn't seem to have caused as much damage. it is waist length but dry. the younger girl's ponytail is so thin it's barely hanging on.

    I think there are a lot of moms out there that just don't know what to do with hair! Wherever it comes from or why, there does seem to be a recurring theme of a parent just wanting hair to "do something" and choosing the accepted route they know of.
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  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    chupie wrote: »
    Fifi.G wrote: »
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.

    One of the reasons I was unaware of the straight hair issue until recently was one of my best friends in elementary school was black and she wore her hair natural as did her mom and dad and there were no other black kids at school and in college where I had a lot of black schoolmates from Chicago and New Jersey, most wore their hair natural. I can only remember one girl who straightened and colored her hair. So I did not at all realize how there seems to be a majority of women who relax their hair from an early age.

    Where you live does make a difference! I can remember seeing a good deal of natural hair, for a few years, as a small child. I do live in the sticks and it is not a largely diverse area. I went to one of the more diverse elementary schools, though. Census wise, while growing up, it was mainly White, Cherokee, African American and a small % of people from Vietnam & Laos relocated to our area, from camps, in the years following Vietnam. It has became more diverse as the years progress but I did see a decrease in natural hair starting in the early 80's, among my female classmates. One of my favorite school pictures if from my older brothers years on the clogging (or square dancing) team. Everyone is wearing flared pants, super hickish butterfly collar shirts with a floral print and several people were rocking their natural hair. It is oddly beautiful. Late 70's/early 80's hoe down is a strange combination. Anywho, I did notice people going natural in the 90's and knew a few little girls being raised natural. Relaxers were never allowed to to touch my friends, little cousins, hair. They were raised by her mom and she learned the ropes of caring for their hair. I have never seen either of those girls use so much as a flat iron, and they are in their 20's now. They have been excellent at avoiding any and all damage.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    ^ I guess I should not say girls anymore but I met them when they were 2 and 4. I still see little curly babies.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    adthomas wrote: »
    chupie wrote: »
    Fifi.G wrote: »
    ^ Granted that is something I have noticed more and more of in the past 5 years. PBS was one of the 3 channels I steadily got as a child and I still check in from time to time and my mom watches something on PBS every day. Quilting, nature shows, gardening & cooking, spotlights on local artists, programs school children are involved in, etc. Day to day people as opposed to a large fantasy/glam image machine.

    One of the reasons I was unaware of the straight hair issue until recently was one of my best friends in elementary school was black and she wore her hair natural as did her mom and dad and there were no other black kids at school and in college where I had a lot of black schoolmates from Chicago and New Jersey, most wore their hair natural. I can only remember one girl who straightened and colored her hair. So I did not at all realize how there seems to be a majority of women who relax their hair from an early age.

    I'm sure where you live plays a part. Although I didn't have natural hair I saw more of it as a child when I lived on the West Coast versus the South. I found people in the south to be more concerned about hair, nails clothing or just beaty overall. Some people see it as a right of passage for growing up..Also there are some homes were relaxers are forbidden. Curly Nikki's parents for example. I think there is also a generational component. All but one of my grandmothers and great grandmothers never used chemicals but only one ( my avatar) wore her hair curly. The rest were pressed. So technically they were natural. But my first cousin texlaxed her kids at 4 and 6. The older girl has courser hair so it doesn't seem to have caused as much damage. it is waist length but dry. the younger girl's ponytail is so thin it's barely hanging on.

    I would say that is fairly accurate when it comes to the south. Well, there are plenty of southern women only somewhat concerned and many who could give two ..... but the ones who are into overall appearance do tend to go all out. And keep it up at all times. It's very common to hear stories about women who had to do their hair, put on a full face of makeup, and iron their outfit as their spouse was having a heart attack and waiting to go to the hospital :-/ That's more common with the older women though.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Curl Neophyte Posts: 15,490Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Back to the subject at hand... In my earlier posts I mentioned hair ads I remember well and general attitudes toward curls. I think a lot of that shaped how people around my age, that I know and went to school with, viewed different hair patterns. It was completely natural and normal to see several different hair types in print ads and on tv. Not even a second thought was given to it. I always paid attention to peoples hair because my mom was so interested in it. Several afternoons of flipping through publications for stylists, with mayonnaise or cholesterol in my hair, kind of stuck. Slight Pun intended. Of course there was that kid who called my best friend Medusa because of her curls, but he/she also turned around and insulted Susie's braces and Carols leg braces, and Timmy's glasses, etc. A side from random and stupid teasing, I never heard anyone make any seriously nasty or constant remarks toward someones hair. I did not go to a school that suspended people for any type of hair style I did not hear students in high school or college tell others that they needed to be like everyone else and straighten their hair. People had all kinds of hair styles, and it was all good. I never heard of anyone not getting a job due to hair type, thank God. That is insanity.

    That is why I find several situations that some may call SHP to be nonsense. I've had stylists want to straighten my hair because they are lazy and only have minimum skills, not because of privilege. If people think you have to straighten your hair to be like everyone else... They are followers who can not function outside of advertising group think. That is not privilege. It is sad. Again, I absolutely do think it exists in some situations but a lot is pure nonsense.

    One ETA: I was talking to my mom about her cosmetology classes in the early 60's. She said the instructor told them, "there is a different way to cut curly hair" and that was it. They did not cover it, and it was never mentioned again. That was some crap. Especially when you consider the number of potential natural clients and one of the largest sources of salon income at that time... The Blue Hair Special. Perms. One of the largest, continuous, complaints I heard from elders was, "she gave me a great perm and then cut most of it out".
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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