When to start being concerned?

KaiaKaia Registered Users Posts: 8,815 Curl Connoisseur
about a toddler not talking? Dylan talks a LOT... unfortunately in an unknown foreign languauge. :banghead: The words he knows and says consistently are "mom," "dada," ow," "bokaboka" for chicken, "mnia" for food, drink, and nursies, and sometimes "kah" for food. Don't ask. Sometimes he says "ball" and "bad dog" very well, but most times he;s not too big on enunciating and they turn into "bugabah" and "patoh" or "bapoh." He understands a lot and points, so I'm not concerned about Autism, but when should I start being concerned about the delayed speech and look into getting him evaluated?
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Comments

  • deedlesdeedles Registered Users Posts: 2,467 Curl Connoisseur
    How old is Dylan Kaia?

    Liam was a late talker too! just little words and then it seemed like all at once a flood of words.. (he picked up a lot from us reading to him constantly and also watching TV).. I know the TV part isn't the best but the educational stuff is great! (shows like WordWorld)

    If you are concerned my first suggestion off the bat get his hearing tested.. since speech and hearing go hand in hand..

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  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Registered Users Posts: 31,259 Curl Connoisseur
    Sounds like he's communicating just fine to me. He's saying things and you know what they are. That's communication.

    My oldest didn't say any real words til he was 3. He communicated with points and grunts very well though. When he finally started talking, it was in complete sentences with perfect enunciation.
  • dreamingmusedreamingmuse Registered Users Posts: 28
    How old is Dylan? (I'm new here and this is my first post, yay!) He sounds like he has a good start with language. In the beginning it sounds like they are speaking a whole other language that only they understand, but in time you'll find those things he babbles become clearer and one day they are actual words! That he understands and points a lot is also very very good!

    I have a 5 year old son that has Autism and he didn't speak a word until he was 3, other than babbling and suddenly reciting the alphabet one time at 2 and a half!
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,060 Administrator
    My son said a few little words here and there and spoke baby Chinese the rest of the time. His first real understandable word was poop when he was about two. He wasn't saying he had to go but he'd motion for you to follow and he'd should you the catbox and point to the cat and say, "Poop." Lovely, huh? I was worried that he was not going to be able to speak or that he had a disability. But he was able to make it know what he wanted and he understood 100% of what was being said and he responded in baby Chinese at the appropriate break in conversation. He just wham starting speaking in full complete grammatically correct sentences in just about the course of a day or two.
  • MagooMagoo Registered Users Posts: 2,173 Curl Neophyte
    My son was also VERY vocal (still is) but didn't really start talking using understandable words until he was almost 2. I was concerned and brought it up to his ped who said that as long as he understood and was trying to communicate somehow that I shouldn't be concerned. He also told me not to automatically respond when C would point or grunt for something which I was doing. If C pointed to his sippy cup, I'd just hand it to him. What we started doing whenever he would point and grunt for something was say "C do you want your (whatever)?" and try to see if he would say it and then hand it to him whether he said it or not. I found that this really helped.

    Once he did start talking it was like a dam just burst open. To this day, he just doesn't stop! :toothy7:
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  • KaiaKaia Registered Users Posts: 8,815 Curl Connoisseur
    Sorry, I forgot I had taken the age tickers out of my siggie. D turns 2 this Saturday. :shock:
    *Poster formerly known as Bailey422*

    Here's all you have to know about men and women: women are crazy, men are stupid. And the main reason women are crazy is that men are stupid. ~ George Carlin
  • deezee02deezee02 Registered Users Posts: 1,509
    Personally, I do not think it hurts to get him tested. Testing should be free through your county. A speech therapist will evaluate him and if he/she thinks it is a hearing program he/she will send him to get his hearing tested. He might have problems gliding his letters together (Steven does this, it seems a lot runs together), which could account for the other language aspect.
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  • sarah42sarah42 Registered Users Posts: 4,034
    That sounds very very similar to Connor. He had a decent vocabulary but very rarely said more than a single word at a time, and everything I read said they're supposed to be saying two-word sentences by age 2. His pronunciation was also difficult to understand, and he spoke a lot of jibberish. I did have him evaluated by the Early Intervention program when he was about 2 years 4 months. They looked at all areas of development, and the results said that he had a minor delay in speech and fine motor/adaptive skills, but not significant enough to qualify for services.

    We've just been trying to encourage him to talk and making him use his words to get things. One day Connor wanted to go outside and play, and he kept grabbing my husband and dragging him to the door. My husband made him say, "Go outside" before he would take him. Since then, Connor has been putting words together and making longer sentences. His pronunciation is still not great. He can't say R and L very well, and sometimes he just doesn't enunciate words well. He'll say something like, "I...da..da..da..ice cream," and I have to prompt him, "Connor, say it clearly." Then he'll say, "I want some pink ice cream" or whatever.

    I think his speech also took off when he was potty training this past summer. I don't know if there's a connection at all, but I've theorized (to myself) that maybe building his skills in one area caused a developmental leap in other areas too.
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  • sarah42sarah42 Registered Users Posts: 4,034
    Also, do you speak more than one language in your home? That can make their language develop more slowly, or it has some effect like that. We do not, but I've read about that when I was looking stuff up online.
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  • curly_keltiecurly_keltie Registered Users Posts: 791
    sarah42 - that is an interesting point about potty training and language. I know since January, my DS's language has EXPLODED. I don't recall how much he was talking at Dylan's age...but I know it wasn't a lot. Now, as I suspected, he won't stop talking.

    One tip a community health nurse gave me was to point at my mouth, tell DS to watch my mouth as I pronounced a word. It helps even to this day with more complex words.
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  • subbrocksubbrock Registered Users Posts: 8,212
    i was/am going through the same thing with majerle. shes been "talking" since she was 10 months old, but mostly in a language that only she and i understand. in my opinion, she doesnt speak as clearly as most kids her age and i was looking into getting her evaluated as well. in the meantime, ive been making her use the correct word for something instead of her made up word for it. i also make her look at my mouth if its a word shes having trouble with. if its a word shes still not getting right, we both say it in the mirror so that she can see what her mouth is doing differently from mine. its definitely helped a lot (probably combined with nature just taking its course) and im not as worried about her as i was 6 months ago.
  • fuzzbucketfuzzbucket Registered Users Posts: 996 Curl Connoisseur
    We had Harry evaluated at 20 months because he only said Mama and Dada. He would point, sign, grunt and say made up words/sounds. His comprehension was fine, but his expressive language was at an 11 month level, based on the evaluation. We've been in Early Intervention since then and have discovered he has sensory processing issues that have contributed to his speech delay. He's doing great and talks a lot now (29 months old). He'll be in the program until at least 32 months old, if not 36 months, based on his next evaluation. I can't say enough good things about the program he's in.

    Getting evaluated is free and fairly simple. If he doesn't qualify, they can get you started with some strategies to try at home. Can't hurt, might help!
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  • cosmicflycosmicfly Registered Users Posts: 1,814
    Deedles' suggestion for a hearing test is excellent. While you'd probably have recognized a more severe hearing loss by now, a milder one could be present. There's definitely a continuum of development, however, when a two year old child is not using a variety of vocabulary (the average range typically given is 50- 200 words) and beginning to combine words, I like to see them just to make sure there's nothing else going on (for example, comprehension issues, oral issues interfering with articulation of sounds). Some kids truly are just late talkers will be fine on their own while some kids really will benefit from some therapy. An Early Intervention evaluation should be free and it should give you the answers you need- a speech pathologist who specializes in infants and toddlers/ young children is better equipped to tell the difference between late talking and language delay than a pediatrician. If you're concerned, consider having him evaluated.
  • KaiaKaia Registered Users Posts: 8,815 Curl Connoisseur
    Argh, I typed out a long response and the browser ate it. :evil: Will try again.

    subbrock - I wish I understood him, but he speaks in a language ONLY he understands. He communicates some things ok, like if he wants to watch blue's clues, he sings "Gah, gah" and does the pawprint handmotion and dance. :lol: But it gets really frustrating when he points to the kitchen saying "mnia" and then gets increasingly pissed off as I offer different (incorrect) foods. It's like he thinks he is being perfectly clear, and I'm just totally inept.

    He is definitely ahead in his motor development, so I get the feeling that he's just too busy to bother with silly things like names for things and pronounciation. I've felt like he's been on the verge of a speech explosion for six months now. But everything I read says he should be saying more than he does, or at least be improving and he isn't. I will ask his Dr about the hearing at his two year visit next week. And I think I'll see about getting him evaluated after the holidays. I will hope he doesn't qualify and then I can relax. Or if he does, then I'll know it was the right thing. So either way, it's a win-win, right?
    *Poster formerly known as Bailey422*

    Here's all you have to know about men and women: women are crazy, men are stupid. And the main reason women are crazy is that men are stupid. ~ George Carlin
  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Registered Users Posts: 5,656
    Kaia wrote: »
    I've felt like he's been on the verge of a speech explosion for six months now.

    Solomon's vocabulary exploded after he turned 2, if that's any consolation.
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  • dreamingmusedreamingmuse Registered Users Posts: 28
    Kaia wrote: »
    Argh, I typed out a long response and the browser ate it. :evil: Will try again.

    subbrock - I wish I understood him, but he speaks in a language ONLY he understands. He communicates some things ok, like if he wants to watch blue's clues, he sings "Gah, gah" and does the pawprint handmotion and dance. :lol: But it gets really frustrating when he points to the kitchen saying "mnia" and then gets increasingly pissed off as I offer different (incorrect) foods. It's like he thinks he is being perfectly clear, and I'm just totally inept.

    He is definitely ahead in his motor development, so I get the feeling that he's just too busy to bother with silly things like names for things and pronounciation. I've felt like he's been on the verge of a speech explosion for six months now. But everything I read says he should be saying more than he does, or at least be improving and he isn't. I will ask his Dr about the hearing at his two year visit next week. And I think I'll see about getting him evaluated after the holidays. I will hope he doesn't qualify and then I can relax. Or if he does, then I'll know it was the right thing. So either way, it's a win-win, right?

    I have something that might help for you that helped me so much with my son. During his therapy sessions I was taught to offer him a preferred object and then show him the name for that object in sign language while also saying the name. Then I had to help him form the sign with his hands 3 times and then give him that object. It shouldn't take much time for him to sign it on his own. If he doesn't sign it, you just keep taking his hands and making him form the sign. Then you give him the object as if he signed for it on his own. So you turn it into a game, doing that over and over.

    Then the next step is to get him to say the word while he signs it. Once he gets quite a few words down, you can start teaching him to sign the sentence, "I want ___." That works really well with food items like milk or small bits of a favorite snack. Pour a little milk, get him to sign "I want milk" and if he does it then give him a sip or a bite of his favorite food if you are using that. So even if his speech comes slowly, he will still be able to communicate with you.

    We were assigned a horrible speech therapist that did nothing for my son! This trick was taught to me by his occupational therapist after she consulted with another speech therapist. It worked like magic for us and I think that it is a good thing for every parent to do with their babies.
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Banned Users Posts: 24,963 Curl Neophyte
    deezee02 wrote: »
    Personally, I do not think it hurts to get him tested. Testing should be free through your county. A speech therapist will evaluate him and if he/she thinks it is a hearing program he/she will send him to get his hearing tested. He might have problems gliding his letters together (Steven does this, it seems a lot runs together), which could account for the other language aspect.
    ita
    Like you said, it can't hurt, right?

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