CurlTalk

blended beauty change

1Joy1Joy Posts: 355Registered Users
Hey guys I am just curious about something. I have'nt read posts on here in a while, but the last time I was on everyone talked about not supporting Blended beauty products bcs of some remarks the owner made. Did things change where that is concerned?
My quote:When someone makes you mad do 50 jumping jacks, when someone makes you sad do 50 sit ups. That way your haters can contribute to your 6-pack instead of your Prozac!
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Comments

  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    well, the thread about it was removed, so perhaps a lot of people missed it. But I think some members liked the products and decided to ignore her statements.
  • starrynightabhstarrynightabh Posts: 83Registered Users
    I heard about this. I am curious too about what was said since I love these products. I also heard she took the murumuru (or whatever) butter out of her products cause they are too greasy.
    3b/3c/4a african-asian mix. Using: Herbal Essences Hello Hydration, Suave coconut condish, Aveda Sap Moss products, fantasia IC gel, some phyto products.
  • frizzbegonefrizzbegone Posts: 137Registered Users
    What did she say? I was thinking about trying some of her products?
    3c
    Relaxer free since '96. TIGI Bed Head Control Freak Shampoo, TIGI Bed Head Foxy Curls condish, Let's Jam Conditioning Gel Extra Hold, IC Tea Tree Instant Moisturizer, and African Royale hot six oil
  • 1Joy1Joy Posts: 355Registered Users
    I think if details would be brought up at this point it would just be gossip. if you want to try her products, do so and judge the products.
    My quote:When someone makes you mad do 50 jumping jacks, when someone makes you sad do 50 sit ups. That way your haters can contribute to your 6-pack instead of your Prozac!
    30-Day R3 Method Challenge
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fr3method.com%2F" class="Popup
    Reverse, Retrain, Rebuild Your Body & Mind
  • starrynightabhstarrynightabh Posts: 83Registered Users
    Well I think that people have the right to know the creator's philosophy. That is part of a person's informed decision. Btw, I do have the products and I love them.
    3b/3c/4a african-asian mix. Using: Herbal Essences Hello Hydration, Suave coconut condish, Aveda Sap Moss products, fantasia IC gel, some phyto products.
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    Well, it was the owner herself that said she took the murumuru out of the product because the ingredient was making them too greasy, so I don't feel these details amount to "gossip".

    I personally found that explanation odd, as I have tried some of the products before, and didn't find any of them to be greasy, a feat when you consider their thickness and emolliency.

    I remember that on the former home page of the BB site, the owner named murumuru as one of her two favorite ingredients and went on to cite the many benefits that this butter held for curly hair. It does sound quite strange that she would suddenly remove such a highly favored ingredient from all of her products.

    I recently read that the products were no longer going to be made by the owner, but by a larger cosmetics manufacturing company. Any number of possible technical/financial changes that such a transition would entail could impact the formulation of the products. Murumuru is also a very expensive ingredient and perhaps the owner reevaluated the formula and weighed up its efficacy against its cost-effectiveness. Whatever the reason, it will be interesting to see how the changes affect the product's characteristics.

    BB are a new company, and have done several product reformulations in their lifetime so there are a number of possible reasons for the change. Customers are within their full rights to show an interest in these changes as they are the end users.

    Intelligent people will be curious about these things.
  • keepitmovin2.0keepitmovin2.0 Posts: 653Registered Users
    Taken from the comment scroller on the BB website, but reversed the order and added spaces between posts for readability:

    Emm: I noticed that some of the butters don't have Murumuru butter listed anymore. Are these new formulas

    Blended Beauty: Hi Emm, Shea Butter has replaced it compeletly, because it has a less greasy feel in products where the butter is present at a high percentage.

    Emm: Oh okay. I never detected any greasiness in your products, though. The creams always absorbed into my hair when it dried.

    Emm: One more question : Is the "emulsifying conditioner" still the BTM conditioner from the old formula?

    Blended Beauty: Yep, that's the BTMS. There's only been a couple slight improvements. Although the scientific names will be on the bottles soon, and I'm sure will be confusing. I'm going to add those terms to the ingredients page.

    Blended Beauty: I really like the Shea butter because it is moisturizing with a bit of shine but will not transfer to your clothing and dries completely dry. You can see the difference when you are holding pure Shea butter next to Murumuru butter. You really don't need to worry.

    Emm: Thanks for answering my questions. Your products are the best ones I have ever used. They're perfect for my hair, so I was just worried that they might change. But I feel better now .
    Currently using:

    Poo: CON Sulfate Free poo
    Rinse out: Tresemme Naturals
    Leave-in: CJAOO Daily Cond
    Styler: KCCC sparingly and Ampro Olive Oil Gel where needed
    DT: KBB Lucious Locks Mask + EVOO/Avocado
  • mariposamariposa Posts: 177Registered Users
    Well I think that people have the right to know the creator's philosophy. That is part of a person's informed decision. Btw, I do have the products and I love them.

    i agree and i would really like to know what she said..... perhaps someone could email me offlist?

    i do know that some of the remarks were in a racial context and i would really like to know what it was - especially as it was in a public forum

    i'm sorry she removed the murumuru butter, that's one of the reasons i wanted to try it
    4a/4b tiny penspring curls
    Lifelong natural i.e. never relaxed

    hair growth journey
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  • mariposamariposa Posts: 177Registered Users
    okay well i found a thread on a different forum that speaks for itself

    i.e. the owner lays her own words out there

    she is so determined to differentiate herself to the point of telling people that they cannot understand her hair or have similar hair unless they are biracial.....

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Ftalk.hairboutique.com%2Fforum_posts.asp%3FTID%3D31387%26amp%3BKW%3Dblended%2Bbeauty%26amp%3BPN%3D1" class="Popup

    the best part is near the end of the thread where the black woman is **told/informed** that she is not black but "black-identifying" :lol:

    honestly, i feel a bit sad for her

    seriously, i wonder how many biracial people she knows..... let alone black people
    and it's sad that she doesn't love her own hair
    the hair can be anything from straight to afro
    not all unmixed straight from africa 100% black people have the same hair - this i know personally
    4a/4b tiny penspring curls
    Lifelong natural i.e. never relaxed

    hair growth journey
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2Fboboleta%2F" class="Popup
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    That was the link that set off the whole "ignorant blended beauty owner" thread that went on for 6 pages on here. It did one of those familiar disappearing acts.
  • spiral-ncspiral-nc Posts: 716Registered Users
    Interesting....

    I read through that thread for the first time, and what struck me was this:

    Everyone was saying that there is no such thing as "multiracial hair", "white hair", "black hair", etc. And I'm inclined to agree from a scientific point of view. But humans go on what they see most often, not on science, unfortunately.

    I also just read a thread on another site about Brad Pitt referring to his daughter's hair as "black people's hair". Some were offended, but MOST people thought it was okay and made sense - he was talking about the type of hair that black people TEND to have.

    So if Brad Pitt can say "Black people's hair" or "black hair". And black people can say "white hair", which I've seen quite a bit. Then why can't a multiracial person say "multiracial hair"? I don't think that there really is such a thing, scientifically speaking. But then again, there's no such thing as race, scientifically speaking. And yet we use racial terms quite casually, all the time, as if they refered to something real.
    spirals, kinks, s-shapes and coils.

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2FSpiral" class="Popup

    H is for Henna and Healthy Hair!
    Use only the PURE STUFF
  • ZARIA**ZARIA** Posts: 706Registered Users
    Hmmm..I read it and I will keep my opinions to myself. (':x')
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Hispanic/Black 3A-B
    Mixed hair: Curls, waves and spirals.
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2F7788%2Fhair-growth-ultra-n%2F" class="Popup
  • frizzbegonefrizzbegone Posts: 137Registered Users
    Sprial -nc,
    Your hair routine and products reviews are fabulous! Thanks so much for sharing..
    I just starting using MBC and will try the other products that you recommended. Your site is a tremendous help.
    frizzbegone
    3c
    Relaxer free since '96. TIGI Bed Head Control Freak Shampoo, TIGI Bed Head Foxy Curls condish, Let's Jam Conditioning Gel Extra Hold, IC Tea Tree Instant Moisturizer, and African Royale hot six oil
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    spiral-nc wrote:

    So if Brad Pitt can say "Black people's hair" or "black hair". And black people can say "white hair", which I've seen quite a bit. Then why can't a multiracial person say "multiracial hair"?

    The problem is that "multiracial" is an even less specific description than "black", which must be as general as racial categories come.

    It is idiotic of her to talk of a monolithic idea of "multiracial hair". Will a "multiracial" child born of a Chinese mother and Swedish father have this "multiracial" hair and find Blended Beauty products beneficial to their tresses? what about the "multiracial" child of a Bolivian father and a Pakistani mother?

    If we even limited this to people born of say, one white parent and one black parent; take Thandie Newton, Mya, and Ms. Blended Beauty herself; what does their hair have in common that makes them distinct from the rest of "black hair"?

    The final irony is that in her ridiculous chart of the "multiracial hair types" she shows a fair-enough range of curly hair types typical of black people, including those whose blackness she wouldn't dismiss as "black identified", whatever the hell that means.
  • starrynightabhstarrynightabh Posts: 83Registered Users
    :lol: Black identified. Oh well. I don't like discussions on race. Anyhow, I don't like the idea of race being the determining factor for hair texture...like someone said there are some white people with thick hair and some black people with straight hair.

    You know what I do hate though? I'm half african american, half bengali and I'm pretty dark. Every time I go out, someone asks me if i'm wearing a weave. God, I want to slap them for asking so rudely, like "is your hair store bought?" HATE THAT! One person even insinuated since I was dark I couldn't have my type of hair... I guess its cause i'm "black identified"...lol.
    3b/3c/4a african-asian mix. Using: Herbal Essences Hello Hydration, Suave coconut condish, Aveda Sap Moss products, fantasia IC gel, some phyto products.
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    spiral-nc wrote:

    So if Brad Pitt can say "Black people's hair" or "black hair". And black people can say "white hair", which I've seen quite a bit. Then why can't a multiracial person say "multiracial hair"? I don't think that there really is such a thing, scientifically speaking. But then again, there's no such thing as race, scientifically speaking. And yet we use racial terms quite casually, all the time, as if they refered to something real.

    It's just a very sensitive topic, particularly among african americans. Brad Pitt, as a white person, comes off as insensitive even though most people will imagine that he means type 4 hair with a kinky/coarse texture. Similarly, "white hair" conjures up images of type 1 or 2 hair with a silky texture. And I do agree that "multiracial hair" as people use the term is recognizable in the same way that bogus race categories are recognizable. From what I've seen on the hair type boards here, so-called "multiracial hair" is often 3a/b, 3b, 3b/c or 3c, of a silky/cottony texture that is prone to dryness and tangling. Plenty of black-identified people also have those hairtypes, but type 4 is more prevalent in the black community (in that you see more of it, or else it's relaxed or flat ironed straight). So, the reality is that people of all races are capable of having any hair type, but what is most prevalent or common among the racial groups is what people mean or think when they hear "white hair," "black hair," "multiracial hair" and "latino or spanish hair." (same goes for "asian hair" which conjures up an image of type 1, jet black and silky hair).

    I understand why people are pissed off and the bb founder did come across as ignorant from what I recall of her remarks (which I did not re-read), but I do agree that "multiracial hair" is a recognizable if not homogeneous hair type, just like "black hair", "white hair," "asian hair" or "latino or spanish hair" are recognizable if not homogeneous hair types. It doesn't have to be so controversial. But it is, mainly because society values the different hairtypes unequally, although that might be changing and continue to change. The huge explosion in media images of wavy, curly and very curly hair seems like a step in the right direction. Natural is in.
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • spiral-ncspiral-nc Posts: 716Registered Users
    Good post, World~curls (I mean curltopia :) )!
    spirals, kinks, s-shapes and coils.

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2FSpiral" class="Popup

    H is for Henna and Healthy Hair!
    Use only the PURE STUFF
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    Maybe it didn't come out in the most "sensitive" way, but I actually like what Brad Pitt said and how he said it in the context. I liked the fact that he acknowledged his little girl's heritage and that her grooming might have different needs from his and his wife's. More importantly, I was glad to know that he was learning about her hair, which will probably translate into her learning about and how to care for her hair and that he wasn't just running out to get her a box of PCJ.
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    I do not find Brad Pitt's comments encouraging at all. How old is this kid by now? How long were they planning on adopting her? It would strike me as the plainest common sense that before doing so, you would do the necessary research on the child's heritage and culture. Given that Zahara has spent most of her young life with her head covered in an old rag, it's pretty clear that her new parents didn't bother to do so.

    I have a lot of respect for Angelina in terms of her humanitarian efforts; she actually puts her money where her mouth is, unlike most of the other "cuddly cause" celebrities. But given this slip of the tongue, and some of Angelina's own wild, collect-em-all proclamations in interviews, when it comes to the "rainbow family" she plans to assemble, I have come to see that neither Mr. nor Mrs. Pitt are the sharpest tools in the box.

    Given this, I am very afraid for the upbringing they will be able to give to either Maddox or Zahara.
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    World~curls, I can see what you're saying in terms of the broader societal images of the hair persons of a certain "racial" background would be seen as having.

    However, I disagree with some of your other assumptions of "recognizable types".

    I don't know that there is a "recognizable type" when it comes to the hair a Latina is expected to have on her head, even by non-Latin people. For example, 3c-curls might be something a New Yorker is used to seeing on NY-based Latinos, who are predominantly of Caribbean heritage. But would this be "Latin hair" to someone in LA who is more familiar with Chicanos?
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    On the idea of "multiracial" hair; I don't think everybody just assumes it will be in the 3b/c range, to be honest. I think the imagery you are referring to is based on the assumption of the hair type of a stereotypical wavy-straight haired white person and a black person with a full-blown 'fro. I wonder how for how many multiracial unions this image is actually accurate.

    This is my point; given the vast range of different "races" that could form a "multiracial" union, and the sheer range of hair types that could result, how could Stacey be so presumptuous and glib as to say "you'd have to be mixed to understand", as if there was some universally recognizable characteristic to the hair of every "mixed" person on the planet, or even most?

    Surely someone with hair that is most similar to yours, regardless of whether they are considered "mixed", "black identified", "latin" or "white", or any other description, is best placed to understand it.

    This is why I noted Thandie Newton, and Mya as comparisons. Both are, like the BB owner, products of "interracial relationships" but I doubt they would have much understanding of Stacey's own hair as their own contrasts with hers quite a bit. Farless those "multiracial" people with straight or wavy hair types, not to mention all the different textures.

    Also, regarding your point about prevalence of various hair types among the black community, I would say that "3c hair" is not only as common as "type 4" hair amongst black people, but also that most people of non African heritage would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between the two.
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    I doubt he had been contemplating adopting the child for very long. He didn't initially adopt her. Jolie did and I seem to recall it wasn't long after they got together. (I know WAAAY too much about these people.)

    As far as planning and knowing as much as possible about her heritage and culture, we don't know what sort of research and care they've given to knowing about the culture of her country and its people. What we're talking about is her hair and whether her parents had a clue what to do with it. As far as advance planning on what to do with her hair, how many black women on this board hadn't a clue until they were adults as to how to care for their natural hair, have come to the board b/c they don't want to relax their child's hair but have no idea to care for it in its natural state, how many non-black mothers of biracial (usually black & white parents) come to this board with no idea what to do with their child's hair. It's pretty obvious most people don't give a good deal of thought as to how to groom and care for their child's hair while the child is in utero. Why should A & B be any different in their adoption plans?
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    It's definitely true that hair types vary among groups, and definitely among people who self identify as "mixed." I can also see a pretty clear demarcation of the "typical" or "prevalent" hair type of white + asian mixes (increasingly common in certain parts of the country) and black + white or asian or latino mixes. But what I've noticed in frequenting curly hair sites - which include audiences for blended beauty and other curly specific hair products, 9X out of 10, the self-identified curly haired "mixed" person is claiming a black + non black background. Of course there are exceptions, Sapphire Wingstar is an exception and there are others. But among curly haired mixed people, who would tend to frequent a curly hair site as opposed to Long Hair Community with more type 1s and 2s, there is a prevalent or more typical hair type that is clustered around 3b - could be "pure" 3b, could be 3a/b, could be 3b/c, as I said. There seem to be other common features or hair traits as well.

    As for "latino hair" judging by mainstream marketing and latino communities I have known (which is very broad and diverse), the types would include 1 but more stereotypically 2, 3a, 3a/b or 3b, with a silky texture. That's what is more commonly seen and thought of. As for latinos with 3c hair, from the carribean as you suggest, my sense is that the hairtype is seen as being closer to supposed "black hair," especially if the hair texture is not silky.

    I'm really not trying to say that everyone within a certain "race" or "ethnicity" or even a combination of them will always have a certain hair type. I just think that there are some commonalities and, thus, social perceptions. That's all.
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    Discgirl wrote:
    As far as planning and knowing as much as possible about her heritage and culture, we don't know what sort of research and care they've given to knowing about the culture of her country and its people. What we're talking about is her hair and whether her parents had a clue what to do with it.

    Hair is an important part of most African cultures ESPECIALLY Ethiopian culture, so yes, if they cared more than superficially about the child's heritage that would have come under the cultural research.

    Any responsible person who intends on adopting/giving birth to a child who is of a different culture than theirs will do their research on the culture. It follows that if the child is known/likely to have a different hair type than them, they will do the necessary research and find out what's best. Believe me, it is not that uncommon; I know people who have done so.

    It is irresponsible for parents to overlook this and I am sure you've heard the stories of countless women and girls who have suffered because of their (however well-meaning) parents' nonchalance and incompetence in this area.

    I wonder how long it took for Brad to notice his kid has "black person's hair". What a revelation that that kind of stuff could be growing out of a black person's scalp. :shock:

    There was no excuse for that little girl to be wandering around with bits of rag on her head for so long. I shudder to think of what carelessness lurked berneath. Point blank, If you can't care for the child's hair, why not get a stylist to do it? They aren't short of the cash and quite a few celebs do so. Well, better late than never I suppose.
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    But among curly haired mixed people, who would tend to frequent a curly hair site as opposed to Long Hair Community with more type 1s and 2s, there is a prevalent or more typical hair type that is clustered around 3b - could be "pure" 3b, could be 3a/b, could be 3b/c, as I said. There seem to be other common features or hair traits as well.

    I would agree that BB's comments might make sense on a curly hair board like this, if only in a vague and irritating sense, but she made her comments on hairboutique.com which is not a curly-specific site. No doubt, a lot of the people who frequent that site might be of multiracial heritage, and I'm guessing most of them will not have that special multiracial hair that only mixed people understand. Who knows how many of them even have curly hair?

    She contradicts herself with the chart she linked on that thread, of "multiracial hair" which shows curls from 3a-4b. I do think her choice of words is very much linked with her own desires to create a little compartment above "black" for herself and select other non"black identified" blacks, to borrow her own terminology.
  • jeamariajeamaria Posts: 1,851Registered Users
    As for "latino hair" judging by mainstream marketing and latino communities I have known (which is very broad and diverse), the types would include 1 but more stereotypically 2, 3a, 3a/b or 3b, with a silky texture. That's what is more commonly seen and thought of. As for latinos with 3c hair, from the carribean as you suggest, my sense is that the hairtype is seen as being closer to supposed "black hair," especially if the hair texture is not silky.

    I am not saying this hair type is not seen as being more "black"; it is. However, it is pretty common, to the extent that in NY, a Latina with that hair type is not exactly running the risk of not being recognized as Latina solely because of it. In other parts of the country this may or may not be the case.

    In a nutshell, I don't think there is as general and as recognizable an idea of "latin hair" as your post suggests, beyond not having light hair and not having an afro (as true as either characteristics are of many Latinos).
    I'm really not trying to say that everyone within a certain "race" or "ethnicity" or even a combination of them will always have a certain hair type. I just think that there are some commonalities and, thus, social perceptions. That's all.

    As I said earlier in the thread, I see where you are coming from with the idea of generalized perspectives of certain groups and their hair types. I cannot deny these exist; they are the basis of this discussion. Clearly, I do not agree with you on the specific content of these generalized perspectives, fair enough. We've already established these generalizations do not ring true across the board, and I was certainly not accusing you of espousing this view in your post.
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    jeamaria wrote:

    I would agree that BB's comments might make sense on a curly hair board like this, if only in a vague and irritating sense, but she made her comments on hairboutique.com which is not a curly-specific site. No doubt, a lot of the people who frequent that site might be of multiracial heritage, and I'm guessing most of them will not have that special multiracial hair that only mixed people understand. Who knows how many of them even have curly hair?

    This part of your post made me curious about what they do over there, so I checked out their hair boards. Link: /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Ftalk.hairboutique.com%2F" class="Popup

    The organization of their boards is rather strange. There is a whole separate forum for "African American Hair" plus other forums for "Hair and Special Events," "Hair Extension Topics" etc.

    Then, under the umbrella category of "Hair Talk," which is its own forum, there are separate folders for "Asian Hair", "Curly Hair", "Dreadlocks", "Short Hair", "Straight Talk" etc... Makes me appreciate the more straightforward hair type and general hair and non hair boards here at Naturally Curly. How do you even know where to post on Hairboutique :?: It's very confusing.

    ETA: Here's a thread from that other site about someone's child's "Bi-racial" hair. It's interesting that there seems to be a presumption of what this hairtype is without anyone really spelling things out. I've seen that happen before here, as well. /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Ftalk.hairboutique.com%2Fforum_posts.asp%3FTID%3D39644" class="Popup

    This thread is more explicit. /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Ftalk.hairboutique.com%2Fforum_posts.asp%3FTID%3D28869" class="Popup
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    jeamaria wrote:

    As I said earlier in the thread, I see where you are coming from with the idea of generalized perspectives of certain groups and their hair types. I cannot deny these exist; they are the basis of this discussion. Clearly, I do not agree with you on the specific content of these generalized perspectives, fair enough. We've already established these generalizations do not ring true across the board, and I was certainly not accusing you of espousing this view in your post.

    Oh, that's fine. It's no problem to disagree. It's no big deal and your posts are interesting.

    Spiral-nc - Thanks :)
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    jeamaria wrote:

    She contradicts herself with the chart she linked on that thread, of "multiracial hair" which shows curls from 3a-4b. I do think her choice of words is very much linked with her own desires to create a little compartment above "black" for herself and select other non"black identified" blacks, to borrow her own terminology.

    Last thoughts for the road. You could be right about this, although I don't know her and what she really thinks. It's a shame that the notion of "multicultural" or "mixed hair" has to be tainted by this kind of thinking, but there it is.

    I do like her products (blended beauty), but I don't love them and I haven't repurchased in a long time. Same goes for Curls. For some reason, I like the bb and Curls conditioners A LOT more than the stylers. I'm very picky about stylers, and my favorites are just leaves ins and gels, and not all this butter, custard, pudding stuff. In this same marketing niche, I will admit to loving the [buylink=http://www.curlmart.com/Mixed-Chicks-Leave-in-Conditioner-p-279.html?utm_source=naturallycurly.com&utm_medium=text-link&utm_content=curltalk-post-text&utm_campaign=mixed-chicks-leavein-conditioner]Mixed Chicks leave in[/buylink]. Whenever I go back to using it, I get such moist curls. Love it, and recommend it to others :)
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    deleted
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