CurlTalk

Accidentally left rice out overnight...

medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
I made a pot of brown basmati rice yesterday afternoon and forgot to put it in the fridge.

Should I toss it?
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Comments

  • newcurlynewcurly Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    I would - bacillus cereus grows in rice that isn't refrigerated properly after cooking. I think it grows "best" in fried rice, but I wouldn't take the chance.
    "Well I love that dirty water. Oh, Boston, you're my home!"
  • sarah42sarah42 Posts: 4,034Registered Users
    I would keep it and reheat it well before eating. I am pretty liberal on food keeping though, so others might disagree with me.
    ehLB.jpg
  • LAwomanLAwoman Posts: 2,949Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    YES! Eating it can most definitely cause food poisoning.
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    newcurly wrote: »
    I would - bacillus cereus grows in rice that isn't refrigerated properly after cooking. I think it grows "best" in fried rice, but I wouldn't take the chance.

    Yup, temperature danger zone there. Sure, it probably won't make you sick, but it's best to not risk it.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Yes. Rice keeps worse than other foods anyway. I wouldn't take a chance with it.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • CurlyCurliesCurlyCurlies Posts: 1,641Registered Users
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I would keep it and reheat it well before eating. I am pretty liberal on food keeping though, so others might disagree with me.

    This is me, too. I think it's a carry over from my college days. As long as I nuke it first it's all good. :D. I guess it probably is better to be on the safe side, though.
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  • CocoaCoilyCocoaCoily Posts: 2,648Registered Users
    My MIL leaves white rice out all the time (potatoes too), and we never got sick from it.
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Cripes. I really didn't think anyone would say it would say it could be harmful. It's rice. I'm very annoyed with myself right now.

    Why won't microwaving kill any potential bacteria?
  • ShrekLoverShrekLover Posts: 2,551Registered Users
    My ex made rice a lot and left it on the stove overnight a lot and never had a problem.
  • newcurlynewcurly Posts: 1,310Registered Users
    medussa wrote: »
    Cripes. I really didn't think anyone would say it would say it could be harmful. It's rice. I'm very annoyed with myself right now.

    Why won't microwaving kill any potential bacteria?
    the part of bacillus cereus that makes you sick is the toxin. Once the bacteria multiply and the toxin is formed, microwaving doesn't do anything to it.
    "Well I love that dirty water. Oh, Boston, you're my home!"
  • JosephineJosephine Posts: 14,175Registered Users
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I would keep it and reheat it well before eating. I am pretty liberal on food keeping though, so others might disagree with me.

    This is me, too. I think it's a carry over from my college days. As long as I nuke it first it's all good. :D. I guess it probably is better to be on the safe side, though.

    Same here. I've left rice out a lot but I did have some wierd stomach issues last fall so I'm careful from now on..
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    The bacteria releases toxins as it multiplies, dies, and breaks down.

    Some bacteria, including this one, form spores, which have thick walls that protect them against unfavorable conditions like high heat.
    A spore can't reproduce, but once conditions become favorable again (low or high temperature, high acidity, etc.), it can basically turn back and grow (multiply) in the food.

    Yes, it's unlikely that your batch of rice is contaminated, but there is a risk there, and it doesn't seem worth it for a batch of rice.

    Oh, and the symptoms of intoxication are diarrhea, cramps, and nausea and vomiting. It tends to only last 24 hours, so it's not as bad as some others, but still unpleasant. ;)
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users
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    and I thought I was havin' a bad day...
    
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    Ever since the sports thread wars I have sensed a special connection between [edit] & Wile. Like the connection oil has to water. I almost can't speak of it. Wait....my eyes are misting. ~asq
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  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    Sairis wrote: »
    The bacteria releases toxins as it multiplies, dies, and breaks down.

    Some bacteria, including this one, form spores, which have thick walls that protect them against unfavorable conditions like high heat.
    A spore can't reproduce, but once conditions become favorable again (low or high temperature, high acidity, etc.), it can basically turn back and grow (multiply) in the food.

    Yes, it's unlikely that your batch of rice is contaminated, but there is a risk there, and it doesn't seem worth it for a batch of rice.

    Oh, and the symptoms of intoxication are diarrhea, cramps, and nausea and vomiting. It tends to only last 24 hours, so it's not as bad as some others, but still unpleasant. ;)

    sairis, would the same be true for leaving out quinoa? we left it on the stove overnight, covered. i just ate some for lunch. hope it's ok....
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Sairis wrote: »
    it doesn't seem worth it for a batch of rice.

    If only you knew....

    I either overcook rice, so that you get that crusty part on the bottom of the pan (which I like, but is a waste of good rice) or undercook it, so that it's slightly sticky.

    Yesterday's batch took 45 minutes to cook and even then, it was a bit sticky. I followed the directions exactly. 1 cup to 2 1/4 cups pf water. My cooktop is electric too. So who knows what the heck "simmer" means when you can't really control the tempterature. But I digress.

    I'm a little annoyed that my effort to get it right is wasted because I was a big enough twit to leave it out. Does it make a difference if the pot stayed covered the entire time it was left out?
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users
    Just zap the sht out of it...it s/b fine... :toothy7:
    Hubby didn't notice it? :dontknow:
    0004.gif

    Ever since the sports thread wars I have sensed a special connection between [edit] & Wile. Like the connection oil has to water. I almost can't speak of it. Wait....my eyes are misting. ~asq
    Let’s just stay together and tell the world to kiss our ass. ~P


  • LAwomanLAwoman Posts: 2,949Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Does it make a difference if the pot stayed covered the entire time it was left out?

    No.
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    medussa wrote: »
    Sairis wrote: »
    it doesn't seem worth it for a batch of rice.

    If only you knew....

    I either overcook rice, so that you get that crusty part on the bottom of the pan (which I like, but is a waste of good rice) or undercook it, so that it's slightly sticky.

    Yesterday's batch took 45 minutes to cook and even then, it was a bit sticky. I followed the directions exactly. 1 cup to 2 1/4 cups pf water. My cooktop is electric too. So who knows what the heck "simmer" means when you can't really control the tempterature. But I digress.

    I'm a little annoyed that my effort to get it right is wasted because I was a big enough twit to leave it out. Does it make a difference if the pot stayed covered the entire time it was left out?

    Covering would have slowed down the cooling and created more moisture. So, no, sorry. :(
    Simmering is basically a soft boil. You can tell when it's just bubbling, as opposed to a big, rolling bubbling. Boiling is 212 degrees, below that down to around 185.

    I mostly cook brown rice the way I cook white rice except with more liquid, which isn't necessarily the same as the directions on the package.

    But this is a pretty fool-proof method of doing it:

    For 1 cup of rice, use 1 3/4 cups of water, for 1 1/2 use 2 1/2. Combine them in a pot and let sit for 30 minutes. Soaking softens the bran and allows the rice to absorb water more evenly.
    Add your salt, bring to a boil, cover, reduce the heat, and simmer until tender, about 30 to 40 minutes.
    If all the water is absorbed and the rice is undercooked, sprinkle 2 to 3 tablespoons of water on top, without stirring, and cook it for another five minutes. When the rice is tender or just short of done, turn off the heat and let sit for 5 minutes. Fluff up and serve.

    You can also soak the rice overnight.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • realisticrealistic Posts: 2,222Registered Users
    I cook brown rice a lot in my rice cooker and it seems to spoil if I leave it in there without the warmer on overnight. But I can usually tell because it smells gross.
    Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not;
    and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
    -Henry David Thoreau
  • goldygoldy Posts: 5,455Registered Users
    Rice is the one thing I don't mess with...


    sorry! I wouldn't chance it... especially since they say we're more prone to that kinds of stuff with a babe on the way.
    Poodlehead wrote:
    Ah, it all makes sense now. Goldy is the puppet master! :lol:
  • PoodleheadPoodlehead Posts: 6,959Registered Users
    I'm sorry you went through all that trouble, but I would definitely throw it away. Especially being pregnant, your immunities are being used by someone else right now.

    Buy a rice cooker. Perfect every time.
    Minneapolis, MN
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Sairis wrote: »
    The bacteria releases toxins as it multiplies, dies, and breaks down.

    Some bacteria, including this one, form spores, which have thick walls that protect them against unfavorable conditions like high heat.
    A spore can't reproduce, but once conditions become favorable again (low or high temperature, high acidity, etc.), it can basically turn back and grow (multiply) in the food.

    Yes, it's unlikely that your batch of rice is contaminated, but there is a risk there, and it doesn't seem worth it for a batch of rice.

    Oh, and the symptoms of intoxication are diarrhea, cramps, and nausea and vomiting. It tends to only last 24 hours, so it's not as bad as some others, but still unpleasant. ;)

    sairis, would the same be true for leaving out quinoa? we left it on the stove overnight, covered. i just ate some for lunch. hope it's ok....

    Foods involved in outbreaks are usually starchy foods like rice, pasta, and potatoes and also some food mixtures like puddings.
    Quinoa falls under the starchy foods categories.
    I'm sure you'll be perfectly fine.
    Like I said, it's not very likely, it's just a risk when not cooling and storing certain foods properly (all foods really, but some are more risky).
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    Sairis wrote: »
    Foods involved in outbreaks are usually starchy foods like rice, pasta, and potatoes and also some food mixtures like puddings.
    Quinoa falls under the starchy foods categories.
    I'm sure you'll be perfectly fine.
    Like I said, it's not very likely, it's just a risk when not cooling and storing certain foods properly (all foods really, but some are more risky).

    got it. thanks! i will toss out the rest. bummer...
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • CAT301CAT301 Posts: 40Registered Users
    Rice is cheap. I would chuck it.
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users
    Poodlehead wrote: »
    I'm sorry you went through all that trouble, but I would definitely throw it away. Especially being pregnant, your immunities are being used by someone else right now.

    Buy a rice cooker. Perfect every time.
    I'll send you mine...
    0004.gif

    Ever since the sports thread wars I have sensed a special connection between [edit] & Wile. Like the connection oil has to water. I almost can't speak of it. Wait....my eyes are misting. ~asq
    Let’s just stay together and tell the world to kiss our ass. ~P


  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Sairis wrote: »
    Foods involved in outbreaks are usually starchy foods like rice, pasta, and potatoes and also some food mixtures like puddings.
    Quinoa falls under the starchy foods categories.
    I'm sure you'll be perfectly fine.
    Like I said, it's not very likely, it's just a risk when not cooling and storing certain foods properly (all foods really, but some are more risky).

    got it. thanks! i will toss out the rest. bummer...

    Why? If it didn't make you sick, then it's still good, no?
  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    medussa wrote: »
    Sairis wrote: »
    Foods involved in outbreaks are usually starchy foods like rice, pasta, and potatoes and also some food mixtures like puddings.
    Quinoa falls under the starchy foods categories.
    I'm sure you'll be perfectly fine.
    Like I said, it's not very likely, it's just a risk when not cooling and storing certain foods properly (all foods really, but some are more risky).

    got it. thanks! i will toss out the rest. bummer...

    Why? If it didn't make you sick, then it's still good, no?

    good point....
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • FreeCurlsFreeCurls Posts: 4,408Registered Users
    Medussa, personally, I'd eat it. I'm sure it's fine.
    [FONT=&quot]Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce & FreeCurls[/FONT]


  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    I bake my rice. I used to never be able to get it right on the stovetop then I discovered this in my Cooks Illustrated.

    they use 1 1/3c rice to 2 and 1/3 c water. I reduce that down to a 1c rice and 1 3/4 to 2 c water. Use boiling water and a little oil (I usually coat the pan in oil) combine in a casserole dish and cover with either cover or 2 layers of tinfoil. Bake at 425 until done. Usually 40 mins.

    This frees up my stovetop and by the time the rice is done so is everything else!
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Just zap the sht out of it...it s/b fine... :toothy7:
    Hubby didn't notice it? :dontknow:

    I mentioned it to him last night, as we watched tv. I asked him to remind me to put the rice away. He didn't. :confused1:
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