CurlTalk

Dog Training

ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
So, I took my pit bull to his first formal session of dog training this morning, and guess what? He was fantastic! From his first look at the trainer, who is almost exactly my size (and a woman), he knew there was no getting away with his usual bossiness, and fell right into line.:salut:

I've been an indulgent mother. It's embarrassing! I'm proud of him, but ashamed of myself.

Comments

  • SnarlsSnarls Posts: 2,537Registered Users
    I really think dog training classes are more about training people than anything else. I have a reputation for being a terrible spoiler of pets. The dogs passed obedience just fine, I'm not so sure about myself.
    formerly Castella
    (my dogs aren't snarly, my hair is)
  • AG.AG. Posts: 1,519Registered Users
    Whatever you do, please stay away from "trainers" who follow Cesar Millan's techniques. Positive reinforcement is the answer. :)


    .
    Northern Colombia.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    Snarls, I know! The dog is fine ---- I'm the goofball. I literally had no idea he could behave this well, thanks to my adoring ways. :oops:

    ag: The trainer's never seen C.M.'s show. Nor have I. She talked about partnering, not dominating. It seemed fair minded. What's your take on C.M.'s methods?
  • AG.AG. Posts: 1,519Registered Users
    ninja dog wrote: »
    What's your take on C.M.'s methods?

    Millan's methods are cruel and outdated.


    .
    Northern Colombia.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    I've never seen his show. Is he a zapper? I read a critique that alluded to his being "extreme" in Bark magazine recently, but that's all I really know.

    My trainer has me behaving in a relaxed way while controlling my boy on a leash. No choking or zapping or yanking; just handling the leash differently and issuing quiet commands. It feels like night and day. (He's still going to get half the bed at night:love2:)
  • CurliLocksCurliLocks Posts: 10,572Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    ninja dog wrote: »
    Snarls, I know! The dog is fine ---- I'm the goofball. I literally had no idea he could behave this well, thanks to my adoring ways. :oops:

    ag: The trainer's never seen C.M.'s show. Nor have I. She talked about partnering, not dominating. It seemed fair minded. What's your take on C.M.'s methods?

    I like that idea. :) That's how it was with my dog(s). We were more like partners, although if there was a conflict, *I* was the boss. ;) (getting up on furniture that was not his, trying to eat off the table that he could literally have stood and ate at.....)

    According to CM, I would be a pad owner because I allow the dog to have an opinion, so to speak. Otherwise, I think his ideas are OK. He is not abusive or mean, just very dominance-oriented.

    Have fun at lessons! My dogs always loved to go, it was fun for them. Since I always had large, strong dogs, lessons were a good way to show they couldn't walk all over me (I'm petite).
    SF Bay Area, CA * "The Angel-Goddess-Guru of Haircoloring" :D
    3b/c/a mix. medium texture, low porosity
    My Motto: Strand Test! some hair pics
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] -- gone, but never forgotten.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    That's exactly why I'm going ---- because my bully pulled me down on Saturday (by accident).

    I like that my dogs have opinions. It's funny when they give voice to their desires ("woo-woo-woo; I want to sleep beside you!"). I'm just not going to let it happen on walks with a dog that's at least half my weight anymore!
  • CurliLocksCurliLocks Posts: 10,572Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    Exactly! My Samson weighed nearly as much as I did (he was 110# of BIG muscle dog in his prime) but never tried anything. I was afraid he'd literally drag me across streets to get to cats (hated them) but never did. I miss how he would complain about something he didn't want to do (low grumbling). :( :)

    Oh, just watch your back! I got bit by a dog while we were walking in circles. It just jumped up and bit me in the back of my thigh! :shock: WTH! Hubby was watching, and good thing, because the dumb owner did not believe his dog did it, although I was bleeding. And then had a fit when I had to report it to the authorities--the clinic did when I went for a tetanus shot. Weird incident.
    SF Bay Area, CA * "The Angel-Goddess-Guru of Haircoloring" :D
    3b/c/a mix. medium texture, low porosity
    My Motto: Strand Test! some hair pics
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] -- gone, but never forgotten.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    It's private training. I feel so......privileged!(In fact, this has to do with the hours she's free, and the fact that we live in hickville, USA.)

    Low grumbling is funny. My boy does it sometimes when I try to shove his big bottom over to HIS side of the bed. He prefers to sleep with as much of him as possible on me. It's sweet, for about five minutes.

    Your Samson sounds like he was the best boy! He could have dragged you, but never did. Sniff, sniff. I love dogs!
  • Rebecca deWinterRebecca deWinter Posts: 2,254Registered Users
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Whatever you do, please stay away from "trainers" who follow Cesar Millan's techniques. Positive reinforcement is the answer. :)


    .

    agree! especially with the bolded.

    i also agree with the statement that it's more about training people - couldn't agree more!

    i take quigley to private lessons also because he's very reactive, but we've made a lot of progress using positive reinforcement.

    are you using a clicker at all or just doing a verbal marker?
    *~*displaced yooper*~*
    :hockey: \m/ \m/
    3069786076_f03f452f63.jpg?v=0
    master quigley and queen ruby, my puppy loves <3
  • Rebecca deWinterRebecca deWinter Posts: 2,254Registered Users
    here's a great article from the american veterinary society of animal behavior about "dominance theory" in training. it includes information on the "alpha roll" too.

    just fyi if anyone wants it!

    link here
    *~*displaced yooper*~*
    :hockey: \m/ \m/
    3069786076_f03f452f63.jpg?v=0
    master quigley and queen ruby, my puppy loves <3
  • CurliLocksCurliLocks Posts: 10,572Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    Private lessons! Lucky you! :) Yes, he was the best dog ever.
    Someday, we may get another, but it's a hard spot to fill.
    SF Bay Area, CA * "The Angel-Goddess-Guru of Haircoloring" :D
    3b/c/a mix. medium texture, low porosity
    My Motto: Strand Test! some hair pics
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] -- gone, but never forgotten.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    CurliLocks wrote: »
    Private lessons! Lucky you! :) Yes, he was the best dog ever.
    Someday, we may get another, but it's a hard spot to fill.

    Aw........
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Whatever you do, please stay away from "trainers" who follow Cesar Millan's techniques. Positive reinforcement is the answer. :)


    .

    agree! especially with the bolded.

    i also agree with the statement that it's more about training people - couldn't agree more!

    i take quigley to private lessons also because he's very reactive, but we've made a lot of progress using positive reinforcement.

    are you using a clicker at all or just doing a verbal marker?

    Just verbal markers, although I give a nudge with my knee if need be. Nothing violent, just a reminder of where exactly he should be.

    But I know people swear by clickers.
  • Rebecca deWinterRebecca deWinter Posts: 2,254Registered Users
    ninja dog wrote: »
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Whatever you do, please stay away from "trainers" who follow Cesar Millan's techniques. Positive reinforcement is the answer. :)


    .

    agree! especially with the bolded.

    i also agree with the statement that it's more about training people - couldn't agree more!

    i take quigley to private lessons also because he's very reactive, but we've made a lot of progress using positive reinforcement.

    are you using a clicker at all or just doing a verbal marker?

    Just verbal markers, although I give a nudge with my knee if need be. Nothing violent, just a reminder of where exactly he should be.

    But I know people swear by clickers.

    i do love the clicker myself when working with quigley, but that's mostly due to his personality and the nature of the things we work on.

    with ruby i was just using a verbal and it worked beautifly with her. :)
    *~*displaced yooper*~*
    :hockey: \m/ \m/
    3069786076_f03f452f63.jpg?v=0
    master quigley and queen ruby, my puppy loves <3
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    Do you think there's something specific about the noise of the clicker that appeals to dogs, or do they have to learn that it means they need to modify an action?
  • AG.AG. Posts: 1,519Registered Users
    The dog is taught to associate the sound of the clicker with doing something right. Clickers are rarely used, because you can do the same with treats.


    .
    Northern Colombia.
  • AG.AG. Posts: 1,519Registered Users
    Sorry for answering a question that wasn't directed at me.


    .
    Northern Colombia.
  • Rebecca deWinterRebecca deWinter Posts: 2,254Registered Users
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Not exactly. The dog is taught to associate the sound of the clicker with doing something right.

    Clickers are rarely used, because you can do the same with treats.


    .

    actually, i use a clicker and treats. i use the clicker to mark the desired behavior, so when he hears the marker (click) he knows he done good and that a reward (usually food treat, sometimes a ball) is coming. i like using the clicker because timing is sometimes very important, so i can quickly mark the exact behavior that i want. :)
    *~*displaced yooper*~*
    :hockey: \m/ \m/
    3069786076_f03f452f63.jpg?v=0
    master quigley and queen ruby, my puppy loves <3
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Sorry for answering a question that wasn't directed at me.


    .


    ag, you're welcome to join in! Please feel free!
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users
    ag_613 wrote: »
    Not exactly. The dog is taught to associate the sound of the clicker with doing something right.

    Clickers are rarely used, because you can do the same with treats.


    .

    actually, i use a clicker and treats. i use the clicker to mark the desired behavior, so when he hears the marker (click) he knows he done good and that a reward (usually food treat, sometimes a ball) is coming. i like using the clicker because timing is sometimes very important, so i can quickly mark the exact behavior that i want. :)

    That makes sense. Not sure I'm organized enough to plan anything more than verbal or food rewards.