Shampoo at the beach?

Ok so i'll be at the beach this spring break and I'm wondering about shampooing. I heard that the salt water from the ocean is suppose to be really good for your hair..but i also heard that you should wash your hair really well after getting out of the water? Which one is true? And if i do need to wash my hair afterwards..can i co-wash it out or low-poo or do I have to sulfate wash? Also..what is considered "low-poo?" Sorry for all the questions lol...just want to make sure i don't do any unneccesary drying of my hair or not clean it well.
CG Since Nov 2008 and Currently using:
Co-wash: VO5 strawberries and cream
Conditioner: Suave Fresh Mountain Strawberries
Gel:Fantasia IC Gel w/ Sparklites(only use when pulling my hair back in slick ponytail)

Follow Me on Twitter~~~~~>www.twitter.com/CourtneyAllenW

Comments

  • CrazyCurlyHairedGuyCrazyCurlyHairedGuy Posts: 151Registered Users
    Aww no one has any ideas? lol
    CG Since Nov 2008 and Currently using:
    Co-wash: VO5 strawberries and cream
    Conditioner: Suave Fresh Mountain Strawberries
    Gel:Fantasia IC Gel w/ Sparklites(only use when pulling my hair back in slick ponytail)

    Follow Me on Twitter~~~~~>www.twitter.com/CourtneyAllenW
  • farmgirl598farmgirl598 Posts: 33Registered Users
    I'm no pro, but I would think a thorough rinse and co wash would do the trick. That's what I plan to do this summer at the beach.
  • CrazyCurlyHairedGuyCrazyCurlyHairedGuy Posts: 151Registered Users
    Yeah..i think that might be the best thing! Thanks!!
    CG Since Nov 2008 and Currently using:
    Co-wash: VO5 strawberries and cream
    Conditioner: Suave Fresh Mountain Strawberries
    Gel:Fantasia IC Gel w/ Sparklites(only use when pulling my hair back in slick ponytail)

    Follow Me on Twitter~~~~~>www.twitter.com/CourtneyAllenW
  • mpgirlmpgirl Posts: 1,163Registered Users
    A simple rinse with clear water is enough to rinse out the ocean's salt. I live at the beach and after playing in the surf, my hair dries really soft with no definition but it can be drying for some.

    I just rinse under the spigots provided at my beach so it doesn't sit on my hair too long.
    3b spirals, fine texture, normal porosity, dense
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    Nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect. -wabi-sabi

  • BoomygrrlBoomygrrl Posts: 4,940Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    It's not like chlorine, so I don't think you need to shampoo it out. Some would argue that you don't need to shampoo chlorine out...but I would...that's just me.
    But salt can be easily rinsed out. I would do a CO wash, just to make sure the salt, sand, and sweat get out.
    That's right, I said it! I wear scrunchies!!

    I am a sulfate washing, cone slabbing, curly lovin' s.o.b. The CG police haven't caught me yet.
    :blob8:

    3a/3b
  • mickaliamickalia Posts: 88Registered Users
    Lived at the beach for years... when I was done playing in the water for the day, I would rinse my hair out in one of the showers at the public access entrances. I always threw a leave-in and a styling product (usually a curl creme) in my bag and finger-combed thru my damp hair after and let air dry. Made for the best beach hair ever. Then wash/condish later as normal!

    :love5:
  • CrazyCurlyHairedGuyCrazyCurlyHairedGuy Posts: 151Registered Users
    Thanks for the tips everyone!

    Wow mickalia that sounds awesome! I just might do that!!

    And Boomy, you think chlorine should be shampooed out? With a low poo or regular sulfate shampoo? For some stupid reason my friends rented a condo this year instead of a beach house (beach houses are so much better because you can walk off your deck and hit the water in like 15 steps..condos you have to go down an elevator and walk across a parking lot before you even hit sand!!) So i'm pretty sure the condo will have a pool and i think I heard one of my friends talking about getting in the pool if the ocean is too cold...I don't plan on getting in the pool because the last time my hair touched chlorine it was sooo brittle and dry afterwards...and also if I don't want to have to shampoo my hair ever again so if i can avoid that..that would be great..do you know of any swimming cap that will actually stay on a curly's head? Like my hair is super thick..and I'm sure it will break out of any cap i put on it.
    CG Since Nov 2008 and Currently using:
    Co-wash: VO5 strawberries and cream
    Conditioner: Suave Fresh Mountain Strawberries
    Gel:Fantasia IC Gel w/ Sparklites(only use when pulling my hair back in slick ponytail)

    Follow Me on Twitter~~~~~>www.twitter.com/CourtneyAllenW
  • Laura LeeLaura Lee Posts: 1,828Registered Users
    Thanks for the tips everyone!

    Wow mickalia that sounds awesome! I just might do that!!

    And Boomy, you think chlorine should be shampooed out? With a low poo or regular sulfate shampoo? For some stupid reason my friends rented a condo this year instead of a beach house (beach houses are so much better because you can walk off your deck and hit the water in like 15 steps..condos you have to go down an elevator and walk across a parking lot before you even hit sand!!) So i'm pretty sure the condo will have a pool and i think I heard one of my friends talking about getting in the pool if the ocean is too cold...I don't plan on getting in the pool because the last time my hair touched chlorine it was sooo brittle and dry afterwards...and also if I don't want to have to shampoo my hair ever again so if i can avoid that..that would be great..do you know of any swimming cap that will actually stay on a curly's head? Like my hair is super thick..and I'm sure it will break out of any cap i put on it.

    There are lots of threads about swimming in pools and CG if you search for them :)

    To sum up what I've read: what lots of curlies do is before they get in the pool they thoroughly water log their hair. This helps to prevent the hair from absorbing the water that has chlorine in it since the hair is already saturated. As a further precaution, some curlies will put a layer of conditioner on their wet hair before they get in a water as another way to prevent the hair from taking up the chlorine.

    A note about pool chemistry (I'm work as a pool manager during the summer):

    Chlorine can certainly be very drying to your hair. However, I think what a lot of people don't realize is that the pool's chemicals need to be regulated from both directions.

    Chlorine raises the pH of the water significantly. In order to counteract that effect, we put in hydrochloric or hydrobromic acid. It gets fed in either manually (this process is not pleasant...trust me) or through an automated chemical feeder.

    Basically, chlorine raises the pH, and the acid brings it back down.

    Poorly managed pools are absolutely notorious for poorly regulated chemical balances. Because hotel and condo pools see a lot of kids, whoever is in charge of chemical regulation often thinks it's a good idea to throw chlorine in until it reaches the high end of safety regulation standards (5.0 parts per million in most states)

    This can have two effects, depending on what they are doing in the pump room. Often times these poorly managed pools do not have the specialized automated feeders typical of a nice neighborhood pool. That means someone is having to manually pump acid in to counteract the effects of chlorine. Like I said, this is a semi-dangerous and not fun process. A lot of the time, the people just don't want to do this and will maintain the pH level at the high ends of safety standards (anything above 8.0 on the pH scale is generally considered unsafe).

    The other thing that can happen is that they can actually overcorrect. There is nothing unsafe about a chlorine level of 5.0ppm. It's drying, sure, but it's not unsafe. However, if you overcorrect the acid concentration and bring the pH down to ound 7.0 or below, that can also be equally bad as too much acid.

    It's a fine balance. What you end up with is either chlorine levels around 3.0-5.0ppm and acid levels that can be around 8.0 or down near actual acidity (below 7.0).

    This concerns your hair obviously. The overall point I want to make here is that the effects of pool water on your hair do not only stem from chlorine. The acid concentration can also play a big role. If the acid concentration is above 7.8, you're basically dousing your hair in a mildly basic solution. This solution has water, chlorine, and not enough acid to counteract the effects of chlorine on pH. The elevated pH levels can and will act the same way that anything else that is basic will on your hair; it opens up the cuticle.

    It may be a good idea to do a very thourough conditioning and the occasional ACV rinse if you're swimming regularly to close down the cuticle
    http://www.dormroomcurly.blogspot.com


    www.twitter.com/dormroomcurly

    Fine/thin 2c/3a, Low-Medium Porosity, Dry!
  • CrazyCurlyHairedGuyCrazyCurlyHairedGuy Posts: 151Registered Users
    Laura Lee wrote: »
    Thanks for the tips everyone!

    Wow mickalia that sounds awesome! I just might do that!!

    And Boomy, you think chlorine should be shampooed out? With a low poo or regular sulfate shampoo? For some stupid reason my friends rented a condo this year instead of a beach house (beach houses are so much better because you can walk off your deck and hit the water in like 15 steps..condos you have to go down an elevator and walk across a parking lot before you even hit sand!!) So i'm pretty sure the condo will have a pool and i think I heard one of my friends talking about getting in the pool if the ocean is too cold...I don't plan on getting in the pool because the last time my hair touched chlorine it was sooo brittle and dry afterwards...and also if I don't want to have to shampoo my hair ever again so if i can avoid that..that would be great..do you know of any swimming cap that will actually stay on a curly's head? Like my hair is super thick..and I'm sure it will break out of any cap i put on it.

    There are lots of threads about swimming in pools and CG if you search for them :)

    To sum up what I've read: what lots of curlies do is before they get in the pool they thoroughly water log their hair. This helps to prevent the hair from absorbing the water that has chlorine in it since the hair is already saturated. As a further precaution, some curlies will put a layer of conditioner on their wet hair before they get in a water as another way to prevent the hair from taking up the chlorine.

    A note about pool chemistry (I'm work as a pool manager during the summer):

    Chlorine can certainly be very drying to your hair. However, I think what a lot of people don't realize is that the pool's chemicals need to be regulated from both directions.

    Chlorine raises the pH of the water significantly. In order to counteract that effect, we put in hydrochloric or hydrobromic acid. It gets fed in either manually (this process is not pleasant...trust me) or through an automated chemical feeder.

    Basically, chlorine raises the pH, and the acid brings it back down.

    Poorly managed pools are absolutely notorious for poorly regulated chemical balances. Because hotel and condo pools see a lot of kids, whoever is in charge of chemical regulation often thinks it's a good idea to throw chlorine in until it reaches the high end of safety regulation standards (5.0 parts per million in most states)

    This can have two effects, depending on what they are doing in the pump room. Often times these poorly managed pools do not have the specialized automated feeders typical of a nice neighborhood pool. That means someone is having to manually pump acid in to counteract the effects of chlorine. Like I said, this is a semi-dangerous and not fun process. A lot of the time, the people just don't want to do this and will maintain the pH level at the high ends of safety standards (anything above 8.0 on the pH scale is generally considered unsafe).

    The other thing that can happen is that they can actually overcorrect. There is nothing unsafe about a chlorine level of 5.0ppm. It's drying, sure, but it's not unsafe. However, if you overcorrect the acid concentration and bring the pH down to ound 7.0 or below, that can also be equally bad as too much acid.

    It's a fine balance. What you end up with is either chlorine levels around 3.0-5.0ppm and acid levels that can be around 8.0 or down near actual acidity (below 7.0).

    This concerns your hair obviously. The overall point I want to make here is that the effects of pool water on your hair do not only stem from chlorine. The acid concentration can also play a big role. If the acid concentration is above 7.8, you're basically dousing your hair in a mildly basic solution. This solution has water, chlorine, and not enough acid to counteract the effects of chlorine on pH. The elevated pH levels can and will act the same way that anything else that is basic will on your hair; it opens up the cuticle.

    It may be a good idea to do a very thourough conditioning and the occasional ACV rinse if you're swimming regularly to close down the cuticle

    WOW! Laura you sure do know your stuff!! lol...this kinda scares me a little bit..I kinda don't want to get into a pool again lol...I mean i didn't know they put ACID in there..even though it's a small trace of acid..it's still acid.....so yeah..i'll just stick to the ocean water (it's all natural anyways right?) lol
    CG Since Nov 2008 and Currently using:
    Co-wash: VO5 strawberries and cream
    Conditioner: Suave Fresh Mountain Strawberries
    Gel:Fantasia IC Gel w/ Sparklites(only use when pulling my hair back in slick ponytail)

    Follow Me on Twitter~~~~~>www.twitter.com/CourtneyAllenW
  • discolemonadediscolemonade Posts: 214Registered Users
    WOW! Laura you sure do know your stuff!! lol...this kinda scares me a little bit..I kinda don't want to get into a pool again lol...I mean i didn't know they put ACID in there..even though it's a small trace of acid..it's still acid.....so yeah..i'll just stick to the ocean water (it's all natural anyways right?) lol

    You shouldn't be afraid of something just because it is acidic. Acid is everywhere. Do you never drink soda?

    Vinegar pH of 2.2
    Soda 2.9-3.3
    Even rain water has a pH of about 5.5
    Pure, distilled water has a pH of 7 (neutral)
    3a/b? hair, CG off & on since Oct. 08
  • Laura LeeLaura Lee Posts: 1,828Registered Users
    Laura Lee wrote: »
    Thanks for the tips everyone!

    Wow mickalia that sounds awesome! I just might do that!!

    And Boomy, you think chlorine should be shampooed out? With a low poo or regular sulfate shampoo? For some stupid reason my friends rented a condo this year instead of a beach house (beach houses are so much better because you can walk off your deck and hit the water in like 15 steps..condos you have to go down an elevator and walk across a parking lot before you even hit sand!!) So i'm pretty sure the condo will have a pool and i think I heard one of my friends talking about getting in the pool if the ocean is too cold...I don't plan on getting in the pool because the last time my hair touched chlorine it was sooo brittle and dry afterwards...and also if I don't want to have to shampoo my hair ever again so if i can avoid that..that would be great..do you know of any swimming cap that will actually stay on a curly's head? Like my hair is super thick..and I'm sure it will break out of any cap i put on it.

    There are lots of threads about swimming in pools and CG if you search for them :)

    To sum up what I've read: what lots of curlies do is before they get in the pool they thoroughly water log their hair. This helps to prevent the hair from absorbing the water that has chlorine in it since the hair is already saturated. As a further precaution, some curlies will put a layer of conditioner on their wet hair before they get in a water as another way to prevent the hair from taking up the chlorine.

    A note about pool chemistry (I'm work as a pool manager during the summer):

    Chlorine can certainly be very drying to your hair. However, I think what a lot of people don't realize is that the pool's chemicals need to be regulated from both directions.

    Chlorine raises the pH of the water significantly. In order to counteract that effect, we put in hydrochloric or hydrobromic acid. It gets fed in either manually (this process is not pleasant...trust me) or through an automated chemical feeder.

    Basically, chlorine raises the pH, and the acid brings it back down.

    Poorly managed pools are absolutely notorious for poorly regulated chemical balances. Because hotel and condo pools see a lot of kids, whoever is in charge of chemical regulation often thinks it's a good idea to throw chlorine in until it reaches the high end of safety regulation standards (5.0 parts per million in most states)

    This can have two effects, depending on what they are doing in the pump room. Often times these poorly managed pools do not have the specialized automated feeders typical of a nice neighborhood pool. That means someone is having to manually pump acid in to counteract the effects of chlorine. Like I said, this is a semi-dangerous and not fun process. A lot of the time, the people just don't want to do this and will maintain the pH level at the high ends of safety standards (anything above 8.0 on the pH scale is generally considered unsafe).

    The other thing that can happen is that they can actually overcorrect. There is nothing unsafe about a chlorine level of 5.0ppm. It's drying, sure, but it's not unsafe. However, if you overcorrect the acid concentration and bring the pH down to ound 7.0 or below, that can also be equally bad as too much acid.

    It's a fine balance. What you end up with is either chlorine levels around 3.0-5.0ppm and acid levels that can be around 8.0 or down near actual acidity (below 7.0).

    This concerns your hair obviously. The overall point I want to make here is that the effects of pool water on your hair do not only stem from chlorine. The acid concentration can also play a big role. If the acid concentration is above 7.8, you're basically dousing your hair in a mildly basic solution. This solution has water, chlorine, and not enough acid to counteract the effects of chlorine on pH. The elevated pH levels can and will act the same way that anything else that is basic will on your hair; it opens up the cuticle.

    It may be a good idea to do a very thourough conditioning and the occasional ACV rinse if you're swimming regularly to close down the cuticle

    WOW! Laura you sure do know your stuff!! lol...this kinda scares me a little bit..I kinda don't want to get into a pool again lol...I mean i didn't know they put ACID in there..even though it's a small trace of acid..it's still acid.....so yeah..i'll just stick to the ocean water (it's all natural anyways right?) lol

    Yeah definitely don't worry about it. It's not nearly concentrated enough to make you fizzle or anything; I was just pointing it out as it applies to roughing up the hair cuticle and drying out the hair :)
    http://www.dormroomcurly.blogspot.com


    www.twitter.com/dormroomcurly

    Fine/thin 2c/3a, Low-Medium Porosity, Dry!

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