Nurse more or less during the day to decrease nighttime nursing?

PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
I'm not looking to completely nightwean at this point but I would love it if Sol could sleep longer stretches and nurse a little less frequently at night. I'm aware that at his age (15 months) he doesn't NEED to nurse at night for nutrition, but I believe he nurses out of both comfort and hunger. The other day I only nursed him on one side all night because I was having a problem with my other breast, and in the morning he was hungry and fussy. Plus, he's off-the-charts small for his age and I don't want to take any nutrition away from him at this point.

So, I have two theories about day nursing and I'm not sure which is correct. Should I try to go longer stretches between nursing sessions during the day, so he gets used to going longer, or should I nurse more frequently during the day so he won't need to nurse as much at night? I have no interest in day-weaning any time soon so I'm not looking to do anything that will move us toward weaning (unless he does it on his own, though I don't see that happening any time soon as he's with me 24/7 and LOVES the boobies still). He eats solids 3-4 times a day.

Thanks in advance for any replies.
Faith, 3Aish redhead
Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
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  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    I have heard people try to make sure they nurse every 2-3 hours during the day to help out at night. I almost always do just one side at night, it seems to help me. Then when we wake up, she gets the other side. It all seems to balance out in the end.
  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    I have heard people try to make sure they nurse every 2-3 hours during the day to help out at night. I almost always do just one side at night, it seems to help me. Then when we wake up, she gets the other side. It all seems to balance out in the end.

    Thanks for the tip! I didn't know if by doing that he'd get used to nursing every 2-3 hours, and expect that at night too. That's pretty much what he does now, though he has been going longer stretches during the day lately since he's developed an appetite for solids. Under normal circumstances I don't mind doing both sides at night (I alternate each feeding). I don't have to move in bed at all, I usually just lean forward so I'm laying almost all the way on my belly, to offer him the top boob. Or lately, he's been loving laying across my chest with me on my back, to nurse on the far boob. It's like the cradle hold, with me laying down. It's so sweet when he falls asleep on me like that.
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    PixieCurl wrote: »
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    I have heard people try to make sure they nurse every 2-3 hours during the day to help out at night. I almost always do just one side at night, it seems to help me. Then when we wake up, she gets the other side. It all seems to balance out in the end.

    Thanks for the tip! I didn't know if by doing that he'd get used to nursing every 2-3 hours, and expect that at night too. That's pretty much what he does now, though he has been going longer stretches during the day lately since he's developed an appetite for solids. Under normal circumstances I don't mind doing both sides at night (I alternate each feeding). I don't have to move in bed at all, I usually just lean forward so I'm laying almost all the way on my belly, to offer him the top boob. Or lately, he's been loving laying across my chest with me on my back, to nurse on the far boob. It's like the cradle hold, with me laying down. It's so sweet when he falls asleep on me like that.

    Did that too. I haven't had anyone else tell me they do that....

    I love when she falls asleep across my chest!! Talk about warm fuzzies...:love4:
  • sarah42sarah42 Posts: 4,034Registered Users
    I don't know if this is an option for you, but both my babies woke frequently at night as long as they were in the same room/bed as us. They didn't decrease the night wakings until they went into their own rooms. They were younger than your son (~4 months), but I think having constant access to mama and having such a strong association with nursing at night encouraged them to wake up a lot.

    To answer your actual question, my instinct would be to try to go longer periods during the day to get him used to taking more at a feeding, so he'll be encouraged to go longer at night. I don't have any research to back this up, but it makes more sense to me.
    ehLB.jpg
  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I don't know if this is an option for you, but both my babies woke frequently at night as long as they were in the same room/bed as us. They didn't decrease the night wakings until they went into their own rooms. They were younger than your son (~4 months), but I think having constant access to mama and having such a strong association with nursing at night encouraged them to wake up a lot.

    To answer your actual question, my instinct would be to try to go longer periods during the day to get him used to taking more at a feeding, so he'll be encouraged to go longer at night. I don't have any research to back this up, but it makes more sense to me.

    That could easily backfire. Sounds like he still bf a lot, it would probably be pretty easy to go longer during the day by playing with him and distracting him. But once they are are all in bed, he might latch on and not let go most of the night.

    I would rather try distraction at night instead of during the day. The book No Cry Sleep Solution has some really good ideas for this. One is to turn away from him, one is to gently release the latch when sucking slows down. If it any time baby gets too uspet go ahead and give it to him. The trick is to do this over time and and he should learn another way to comfort at night.
  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    That does make sense, sarah... but I don't think we're ready to stop cosleeping yet. Mostly because I don't want to fully night-wean him yet and I just can't imagine stumbling out of bed and into another room to feed him or go to him when he does wake. Plus we love snuggling with him at night.

    I have thought about, when he's a little bit older, putting his crib mattress at the foot of our bed (our mattress is on the floor too) so our movements won't wake him as easily. But I remember the days before we started cosleeping when his PnP was at the foot of the bed and I'd have to crawl down there every time he woke and it was so exhausting... maybe if he's old enough he'll figure out to crawl to me :lol:
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    I would rather try distraction at night instead of during the day. The book No Cry Sleep Solution has some really good ideas for this. One is to turn away from him, one is to gently release the latch when sucking slows down. If it any time baby gets too uspet go ahead and give it to him. The trick is to do this over time and and he should learn another way to comfort at night.

    I've heard enough about this book that I figured it's time I finally read it. I just placed it on hold at the library. Thanks!
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    That could easily backfire. Sounds like he still bf a lot, it would probably be pretty easy to go longer during the day by playing with him and distracting him. But once they are are all in bed, he might latch on and not let go most of the night.

    I would rather try distraction at night instead of during the day. The book No Cry Sleep Solution has some really good ideas for this. One is to turn away from him, one is to gently release the latch when sucking slows down. If it any time baby gets too uspet go ahead and give it to him. The trick is to do this over time and and he should learn another way to comfort at night.

    I agree and I was going to recommend the No Cry Sleep Solution also. It has a few suggestions for decreasing nursing frequency at night.
    You might be able to soothe him back to sleep without nursing. It will likely mean less sleep in the short run, but you can try rubbing or patting his back, holding him close to you, etc. If he gets upset do nurse him. The trick is to keep at it for a while, like giving it a week or two. Likely he will protest at first and you will end up giving him the breast, then he might be soothed by alternate means, then he might go back to sleep quicker, needing less rubbing, and eventually he may sleep through.
    To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
    I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

    Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    You can also try putting his crib mattress next to the side of the bed where you sleep. That way you have a little separation but he will still be close.
    To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
    I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

    Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    A friend of mine started wearing a turtleneck shirt to bed to discourage night nursing. That way, he had to really wake up and demand to nurse, rather than just doing the half-asleep-sneak-attacks while she was sleeping. She'd just snuggle and pat him at first, and only nurse if he insisted. After a while, he started not wanting to work so hard to get to the nursies and started sleeping through the night, even co-sleeping.
  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    geeky wrote: »
    I agree and I was going to recommend the No Cry Sleep Solution also. It has a few suggestions for decreasing nursing frequency at night.
    You might be able to soothe him back to sleep without nursing. It will likely mean less sleep in the short run, but you can try rubbing or patting his back, holding him close to you, etc. If he gets upset do nurse him. The trick is to keep at it for a while, like giving it a week or two. Likely he will protest at first and you will end up giving him the breast, then he might be soothed by alternate means, then he might go back to sleep quicker, needing less rubbing, and eventually he may sleep through.

    And as long as you know he will still be bf often during the day, the guilt shouldn't get to you...icon12.gif
  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    A friend of mine started wearing a turtleneck shirt to bed to discourage night nursing. That way, he had to really wake up and demand to nurse, rather than just doing the half-asleep-sneak-attacks while she was sleeping. She'd just snuggle and pat him at first, and only nurse if he insisted. After a while, he started not wanting to work so hard to get to the nursies and started sleeping through the night, even co-sleeping.

    Forgot about this one....
  • sarah42sarah42 Posts: 4,034Registered Users
    I hope I didn't sound like a know-it-all, I just wanted to mention the separate beds because it helped the night sleeping a lot within a week or two, and I got my sanity back.
    ehLB.jpg
  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I hope I didn't sound like a know-it-all, I just wanted to mention the separate beds because it helped the night sleeping a lot within a week or two, and I got my sanity back.

    I don't think you did, I have heard many people say this, I didn't think Pixie was ready to stop co-sleeping just yet.

    And what works for one child may not work for another.... When I tried to put my kids in their own beds, it just didn't work. That is great it worked for you. icon7.gif Sanity would be a good thing to have right now.... icon12.gif
  • Brown_Eyed_GirlBrown_Eyed_Girl Posts: 1,353Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    One of my friends told me a story that broke my heart. One of the babies at her daughter's daycare is only fed every four hours during the day at his mom's request so that supposedly he won't wake as often at night. It doesn't matter how hard he's crying, he has to wait four hours.

    Most of what I've read seems to encourage nursing more during the day to decrease nursing at night. At least, this is what they say for babies Lydia's age who tend to get too distracted during the day and make up for the missed calories at night.

    Kind of like Geeky said, I've been trying to rock and shush Lydia back to sleep for her first waking especially if it's only been a couple of hours. If she lays her head against my chest after a minute or so, and starts to go back to sleep, I figure she's probably not that hungry. If she won't settle down that way, then I nurse her.

    Pixie, I nurse leaning over like that at night too when Lydia's in bed with me. I never thought of it until I read about it in Dr. Sear's sleep book. It might have some helpful suggestions for you too.
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    PixieCurl wrote: »
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    I have heard people try to make sure they nurse every 2-3 hours during the day to help out at night. I almost always do just one side at night, it seems to help me. Then when we wake up, she gets the other side. It all seems to balance out in the end.

    Thanks for the tip! I didn't know if by doing that he'd get used to nursing every 2-3 hours, and expect that at night too. That's pretty much what he does now, though he has been going longer stretches during the day lately since he's developed an appetite for solids. Under normal circumstances I don't mind doing both sides at night (I alternate each feeding). I don't have to move in bed at all, I usually just lean forward so I'm laying almost all the way on my belly, to offer him the top boob. Or lately, he's been loving laying across my chest with me on my back, to nurse on the far boob. It's like the cradle hold, with me laying down. It's so sweet when he falls asleep on me like that.

    Did that too. I haven't had anyone else tell me they do that....

    I love when she falls asleep across my chest!! Talk about warm fuzzies...:love4:

    Really? That's exactly what JJ and I do. He's done that since birth.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I don't know if this is an option for you, but both my babies woke frequently at night as long as they were in the same room/bed as us. They didn't decrease the night wakings until they went into their own rooms. They were younger than your son (~4 months), but I think having constant access to mama and having such a strong association with nursing at night encouraged them to wake up a lot.

    To answer your actual question, my instinct would be to try to go longer periods during the day to get him used to taking more at a feeding, so he'll be encouraged to go longer at night. I don't have any research to back this up, but it makes more sense to me.

    That could easily backfire. Sounds like he still bf a lot, it would probably be pretty easy to go longer during the day by playing with him and distracting him. But once they are are all in bed, he might latch on and not let go most of the night.

    I would rather try distraction at night instead of during the day. The book No Cry Sleep Solution has some really good ideas for this. One is to turn away from him, one is to gently release the latch when sucking slows down. If it any time baby gets too uspet go ahead and give it to him. The trick is to do this over time and and he should learn another way to comfort at night.

    Less day nursing made no impact on JJ's night-nursing. Since I started school, his day nursing has been obviously very restricted, and his night nursing has stayed the same - every 2 hours or so. I have come to the conclusion that he will cut back when he is ready and not before.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    ruralcurls wrote: »
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I don't know if this is an option for you, but both my babies woke frequently at night as long as they were in the same room/bed as us. They didn't decrease the night wakings until they went into their own rooms. They were younger than your son (~4 months), but I think having constant access to mama and having such a strong association with nursing at night encouraged them to wake up a lot.

    To answer your actual question, my instinct would be to try to go longer periods during the day to get him used to taking more at a feeding, so he'll be encouraged to go longer at night. I don't have any research to back this up, but it makes more sense to me.

    That could easily backfire. Sounds like he still bf a lot, it would probably be pretty easy to go longer during the day by playing with him and distracting him. But once they are are all in bed, he might latch on and not let go most of the night.

    I would rather try distraction at night instead of during the day. The book No Cry Sleep Solution has some really good ideas for this. One is to turn away from him, one is to gently release the latch when sucking slows down. If it any time baby gets too uspet go ahead and give it to him. The trick is to do this over time and and he should learn another way to comfort at night.

    I haven't read the book, but I've done all of those - not to cut back his nursing, just because I'm tired and want him to stop - and it made no difference for us. I think it depends how avid a nurser your baby is. For some babies that might work but for the really big eaters like J, it may not. Hopefully it works for you though, Pixie!
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    One of my friends told me a story that broke my heart. One of the babies at her daughter's daycare is only fed every four hours during the day at his mom's request so that supposedly he won't wake as often at night. It doesn't matter how hard he's crying, he has to wait four hours.

    Most of what I've read seems to encourage nursing more during the day to decrease nursing at night. At least, this is what they say for babies Lydia's age who tend to get too distracted during the day and make up for the missed calories at night.

    Kind of like Geeky said, I've been trying to rock and shush Lydia back to sleep for her first waking especially if it's only been a couple of hours. If she lays her head against my chest after a minute or so, and starts to go back to sleep, I figure she's probably not that hungry. If she won't settle down that way, then I nurse her.

    Pixie, I nurse leaning over like that at night too when Lydia's in bed with me. I never thought of it until I read about it in Dr. Sear's sleep book. It might have some helpful suggestions for you too.

    Man, I know this will sound judgmental, but that story made me so ANGRY. What a selfish mother. Don't have a baby if you want to sleep the way you did before you had one!!!!!!!!
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • ruralcurlsruralcurls Posts: 2,574Registered Users
    Amneris wrote: »
    I haven't read the book, but I've done all of those - not to cut back his nursing, just because I'm tired and want him to stop - and it made no difference for us. I think it depends how avid a nurser your baby is. For some babies that might work but for the really big eaters like J, it may not. Hopefully it works for you though, Pixie!

    Not a thing I tried worked with my oldest. She nursed extremely often. My younger two are much more reasonable. icon7.gif
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    One thing that happened after about a month of reduced day nursing during the week was that my period came back and has been pretty regular ever since - at least for three cycles - more regular than it was before! So IF that is a good thing for you, it might be worth cutting back day nursing.

    Of course, that may have happened with or without the change in nursing but it seems logical to me that they are related.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    geeky wrote: »
    You might be able to soothe him back to sleep without nursing. It will likely mean less sleep in the short run, but you can try rubbing or patting his back, holding him close to you, etc. If he gets upset do nurse him. The trick is to keep at it for a while, like giving it a week or two. Likely he will protest at first and you will end up giving him the breast, then he might be soothed by alternate means, then he might go back to sleep quicker, needing less rubbing, and eventually he may sleep through.

    I think you're right about the less sleep in the short run but it might work. If I'm not there at naptime my husband can get him to sleep by walking with him, singing to him, etc but sometimes it takes a long time.
    geeky wrote: »
    You can also try putting his crib mattress next to the side of the bed where you sleep. That way you have a little separation but he will still be close.

    Our bedroom is so small that I don't think it would fit this way.... we keep talking about getting a king bed before our next baby and we'll have almost no floorspace width-wise if we do that.
    A friend of mine started wearing a turtleneck shirt to bed to discourage night nursing. That way, he had to really wake up and demand to nurse, rather than just doing the half-asleep-sneak-attacks while she was sleeping. She'd just snuggle and pat him at first, and only nurse if he insisted. After a while, he started not wanting to work so hard to get to the nursies and started sleeping through the night, even co-sleeping.

    I was sure Solomon would be able to find my boobs himself by now (I sleep with my shirt pulled up) but he just cries when he wakes and then I have to get him latched on and everything. If he could find my boobs himself, I probably wouldn't even be worried about it!
    sarah42 wrote: »
    I hope I didn't sound like a know-it-all, I just wanted to mention the separate beds because it helped the night sleeping a lot within a week or two, and I got my sanity back.

    Not at all! You were just saying what worked for you, and I believe it's probably true that cosleeping babies/toddlers wake more often at night.
    One of my friends told me a story that broke my heart. One of the babies at her daughter's daycare is only fed every four hours during the day at his mom's request so that supposedly he won't wake as often at night. It doesn't matter how hard he's crying, he has to wait four hours.

    ...

    Pixie, I nurse leaning over like that at night too when Lydia's in bed with me. I never thought of it until I read about it in Dr. Sear's sleep book. It might have some helpful suggestions for you too.

    That story is so sad. I would NOT agree to that if I were a childcare provider. And come to think of it, I have read Dr. Sears' Baby Sleep Book. I should check it out again.
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • sundaysunday Posts: 535Registered Users
    Maybe it would help to give him more calorie rich solids during the day and as a snack right before bed.
    3 something
    fotki pw: sunday
  • cosmicflycosmicfly Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    What is working for Aidan is to gradually decrease cosleeping. I put him down for the night in his crib. When he wakes, he comes into bed with me, but he has been getting restless and squirmy while nursing, so my thinking is that maybe he needs help on the night weaning front. If I can wake up enough, I usually move him to his crib, he usually goes to sleep if I pat his back. I'm finding that if he's close to me, he will want to nurse nonstop, even if it's making him uncomfortable.

    He nurses/ gets bottles of EBM throughout the day and has solids probably twice a day. The only night feeding he acts like he's hungry at is the one that occurs between 5 and 6 in the morning- and that's not really a night feeding.

    I do like cosleeping with him, but not so much when neither of us is getting any sleep.
  • mad scientistmad scientist Posts: 3,530Registered Users
    We don't co-sleep, but when Sandhya wakes up at night these days its because she's genuinely hungry.

    I've found that this usually happens when she eaten less protein during the day. So I try to give her lots of protein-rich foods (mainly daal) especially in the evening.

    If she's been eating fruit and cereal all day I can pretty much guarantee that she'll be up at night.
  • mayimmayim Posts: 2,301Registered Users
    i agree with those who say nurse more during the day, though the fact is he will probably do that on his own to get the calories he needs during the day if you do some other things to discourage the night nursing.

    you can wear more layers, so the boobies aren't so accessible and fragrant.

    we do aware parenting, so when i was ready to night wean lydia (at around 7.5 months, when i was sure she could get all of her calories during the day) we held her and listened to her cry during the night wakings. she was only waking once or twice a night anyway, and now with occasional exceptions, they have all but tapered off (she's 9 months old now).

    we explained to her that everyone needs to sleep at 'night night time' - mama, papa, baby and the chichis ;), that we knew she might feel sad, and that we would listen to her cry and that she could eat all she needed/wanted to during the daytime. this seemed to help her understand.

    she usually goes to bed around 8, with a last nursing at around 7 and she has her first morning nursing anywhere between 4:30 and 6:30 am.

    good luck!

    xo
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  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    mayim - I never heard of aware parenting before, and I checked out the site and it seems that's pretty much what we do too. Although, I do have trouble with:
    9. Aware parents take care of themselves and are honest about their own needs and feelings. They do not sacrifice themselves to the point of becoming resentful.

    I wouldn't say I'm resentful, but it does get frustrating sometimes. I just feel that if Solomon is crying, day or night, and I have the tools to soothe him (nursing), it's selfish of me not to do so. It might be different if I were working outside the home and getting a good night's sleep were more crucial, but since I'm a SAHM, I can in theory nap when he naps.
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • M2LRM2LR Posts: 8,630Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    PixieCurl wrote: »
    mayim - I never heard of aware parenting before, and I checked out the site and it seems that's pretty much what we do too. Although, I do have trouble with:
    9. Aware parents take care of themselves and are honest about their own needs and feelings. They do not sacrifice themselves to the point of becoming resentful.
    I wouldn't say I'm resentful, but it does get frustrating sometimes. I just feel that if Solomon is crying, day or night, and I have the tools to soothe him (nursing), it's selfish of me not to do so. It might be different if I were working outside the home and getting a good night's sleep were more crucial, but since I'm a SAHM, I can in theory nap when he naps.

    I guess I am a believer that kids need to learn to self-soothe. The human pacifier thing just didn't bode well for me. I think extended nursing is great, but at the same time, I think that kids need to learn to self soothe.

    Plus, he's going to be in for a HUGE adjustment if you have another baby, and that's where the resentment might start (for him). Not meaning to be mean, or anything, but I guess it's just something I would think about if more kids were in my future. I wouldn't want Sol to associate no more soothing/nursing with the new baby arriving (NOT that you're pregnant, but you know what I mean).

    However, I did work out side the home after mine were about 6 ot 7 months old. So, if I were a SAHM, it might have been different.
    :rambo:
  • fuzzbucketfuzzbucket Posts: 996Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Amneris wrote: »
    Less day nursing made no impact on JJ's night-nursing. Since I started school, his day nursing has been obviously very restricted, and his night nursing has stayed the same - every 2 hours or so. I have come to the conclusion that he will cut back when he is ready and not before.

    This was true for us as well. In fact, Harry nursed more at night for a while after pump/day weaning. He stopped nursing completely (day and night) very suddenly on his own and now sleeps through. If he does stir, he's cuddled and patted back to sleep. (DH is currently co-sleeping with him since we aren't quite ready for him to be alone. Yes, I'm neurotic!)

    I agree to nurse more during the day and maybe offer a snack before bedtime in order to get a longer stretch. Harry loves applesauce with baby oatmeal mixed in for his bedtime snack.
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  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    M2LR - I'm actually not opposed to tandem nursing if Solomon still wants to nurse when another baby comes along. I do realize that he'll have to learn to wait his turn and his needs/wants may not be able to be met as quickly as they are now, but that would be the case whether he's still nursing or not.

    I hear you about the self-soothing, but my whole philosophy is that if he's upset and I can do something to make him feel better, I'm going to do it unless I have a really good reason not to. Like, if I were on some sort of medication that [I absolutely had to have and] he couldn't breastfeed while I was taking it, that would be a good reason. Or when he's upset because he doesn't want to be strapped into his carseat, the good reason for doing it anyways is because it would be unsafe not to strap him in (that's an extreme example, obviously).
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
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