Miss Jessie/ Curve Salon

KurlycaramelKurlycaramel Posts: 4Registered Users
Hi, I need help. I've been natural for 8 yrs now, 4B texture and I want a perm to loosen the kinks for easier managablity, so I'm thinking about going to Miss Jessie's salon in brooklyn but its very expensive. Has anyone been there, if so what was your experience? Do you know another salon that does the same thing for less...(a perm but doesn't leave your hair dead straight.). My goal is to be able to wash and go with a curly head of hair, I've had enough of hrs of washing, detangling, moisturizing, twisting only to wear it twistout.
Hair type: 4B, with splashes of 4A. Styles: twist, twistout, blowout afro,cornrow, and hotcomb press. Use to have locks which I cut 3/4 down then combed out.
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Comments

  • *Ani**Ani* Posts: 351Registered Users
    Hi, Ive never been to Curve/Miss Jessie's but I am sure there are some people around here that have...try posting your question on the 3c board and also the general hair discussion board.

    Ive read good reviews of their salon. The only major complaint is that their prices are outrageous.

    Ouidad does a similar process that she calls a "softener" but it is also very expensive.

    I think you can pretty much get a mild relaxer/texturizer (left on for a short period of time) put in at almost any black salon.

    If I were you, though, I would go ahead and go to Curve for my first time since they are very experienced with this sort of thing.
    On Rush Limbaugh: Rather than engage in the admittedly difficult task of justifying GOP policies rationally, the key to Limbaugh’s success is attracting an audience that actually yearns to be lied to.
  • KurlycaramelKurlycaramel Posts: 4Registered Users
    Thanks for the advice, I will. After i posted my question I searched the forum and read alot of infor on curve... I'm still not sure what I'm going to do. The price is upsetting, and the receptionist last time I called over the summer is on the cold rude side. IF, and I do mean IF I go I'll probably follow curlygirl125 advice, go once for the experience and mantain my hair with another less expensive salon. But like I said I think its so wrong and unfair of Curve to make their prices so outrageous. If theire prices were reasonable they would make so much MORE money. You know they raised the price of the [buylink=http://www.curlmart.com/Miss-Jessies-Curly-Pudding-p-578.html?utm_source=naturallycurly.com&utm_medium=text-link&utm_content=curltalk-post-text&utm_campaign=miss-jessies-curly-pudding]curly pudding[/buylink] from $28- $68!!! So many women especially black women would run to curve;women with naturals want more managibility,women with regular relaxers want a change. Anyway I'm going to the library and get some books on hair like "Curly Girl" and this other book by Cathy Howes on UBH System (Ultra Black Hair Growth) both recommended by my sister. (i work in an elemantary school :) must review what I've learned thus far: Curve Salon is not a magic salon, they do good texurizers, they are not they only place that will help me achieve the look I want. I LOVE THIS SITE!!!
    Thanks Again
    Hair type: 4B, with splashes of 4A. Styles: twist, twistout, blowout afro,cornrow, and hotcomb press. Use to have locks which I cut 3/4 down then combed out.
  • *Ani**Ani* Posts: 351Registered Users
    You are welcome. I agree about Curve. Their prices are outrageous.
    On Rush Limbaugh: Rather than engage in the admittedly difficult task of justifying GOP policies rationally, the key to Limbaugh’s success is attracting an audience that actually yearns to be lied to.
  • MeyerGirlMeyerGirl Posts: 170Registered Users
    Ok, I've been there and they do a nice job. but decided to stop going to them since the prices were like a slap in the face.

    They haven't cornered the market on anything

    If you Must/Must get a texturizer go to Mo Hair salon in the East Village ask for An-Drea (pronounced On-dre-ah) don't let anyone else there do it for you.

    -MG
    4a, deep waves and pensprings.
    Boots Pink Curl Creme for sale, Please PM me.
  • mom_is_queenmom_is_queen Posts: 63Registered Users
    I was like :shock: when I read that they went up to $68 for The [buylink=http://www.curlmart.com/Miss-Jessies-Curly-Pudding-p-578.html?utm_source=naturallycurly.com&utm_medium=text-link&utm_content=curltalk-post-text&utm_campaign=miss-jessies-curly-pudding]Curly Pudding[/buylink]. They think they are slick though, it is now $38 + free shipping instead of $28 + $10s&h :roll:.
    1 year Napptural 17Oct05
    Happy to be Nappy Qhemet Junkie :)
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  • KurlycaramelKurlycaramel Posts: 4Registered Users
    Question: MeyerGirl, your a 4b right, do you have a texturizer or 100% natural. Mo Hair Salon gives you that same look as the curve salon b4 and after photos? And knowing what you know now would you still have gone to curve salon or would have gone only to Mo Hair Salon from the beginning? Yeah, I do have to get a texturizer,softener,silkener because I'm impatient now, I really need a wash and go hair-do. I use to labor through the washing process and the end result looks nice but I only use to wash my hair 2-3x a month. Now I go to the gym, and plus I've learned 4B or not ALL hair types should be washed at least once a week. Lastly,for the sake of my hair I have to, now when I wash I threaten sometimes reaching for the scissors, or look at my sister's perm jar. I know I'll regret it but at the time it seems like a good idea.
    Hair type: 4B, with splashes of 4A. Styles: twist, twistout, blowout afro,cornrow, and hotcomb press. Use to have locks which I cut 3/4 down then combed out.
  • CheleighCheleigh Posts: 552Registered Users
    Kurlycaramel:

    Make sure you do a strand test first. Some people's curl patterns in 4B hair don't show up with a texturizer because they don't really have one (straight as opposed to curly). I know gals who take 2-4 hours to do a texturizer retouch because they have different textures on their head so each section has to be done individually, then washed out, then new section done. Otherwise, some sections get over processed, and others under processed.

    Just be careful and make the best decsion for yourself. BTW, there are other salons that do careful texturizers, but most salons are just going to slap on the texturizer and just keep it on for a shorter time than they would a relaxer without regard to strand tests or your different textures. You need a stylist who's willing to take the time to do it right (especially with 4B hair, which can easily go straight instead of curly). The gals I know do their own texturizers because it's time consuming.

    Good luck.
    Natural pics: http://picturetrail.com/shelacious
    pw: kinky
    Hair type: Spongy & kinky texture. Coily & curly strands.
  • KurlycaramelKurlycaramel Posts: 4Registered Users
    THAT'S A GOOD IDEA, THANK YOU
    Hair type: 4B, with splashes of 4A. Styles: twist, twistout, blowout afro,cornrow, and hotcomb press. Use to have locks which I cut 3/4 down then combed out.
  • doubleteadoubletea Posts: 58Registered Users
    MeyerGirl wrote:
    Ok, I've been there and they do a nice job. but decided to stop going to them since the prices were like a slap in the face.

    They haven't cornered the market on anything

    If you Must/Must get a texturizer go to Mo Hair salon in the East Village ask for An-Drea (pronounced On-dre-ah) don't let anyone else there do it for you.

    -MG

    Hey how much do they cost? I know they have a deposit that can be used towards whatever hair service you have done that day. Thanx
    We cannot go back and make a new start, but we can start now to make a new ending.
    pw: reach
    http://public.fotki.com/doubletea/

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  • MeyerGirlMeyerGirl Posts: 170Registered Users
    [/quote]

    Hey how much do they cost? I know they have a deposit that can be used towards whatever hair service you have done that day. Thanx[/quote]

    If you you mean a silkener. I do not know exactly how much one costs. I know that it is over $100.
    4a, deep waves and pensprings.
    Boots Pink Curl Creme for sale, Please PM me.
  • CurlygoddessCurlygoddess Posts: 287Registered Users
    I was like :shock: when I read that they went up to $68 for The [buylink=http://www.curlmart.com/Miss-Jessies-Curly-Pudding-p-578.html?utm_source=naturallycurly.com&utm_medium=text-link&utm_content=curltalk-post-text&utm_campaign=miss-jessies-curly-pudding]Curly Pudding[/buylink]. They think they are slick though, it is now $38 + free shipping instead of $28 + $10s&h :roll:.

    yeah but the free shipping only lasts until march 16!
    I cant belive how much they are charging for hair products!!!
    Thick coarse 4b hair. Holy Grail: Kinky-Curly Curling Custard. Trying to grow it to bra strap length. Currently collar bone length.
  • BlackBerriBlackBerri Posts: 12Registered Users
    I haven't been to Curves, but from what I'm told-it's not all that. Their silkener consists of mixing Mizani perm with conditioner and then leaving it on for 5 minutes.I don't think its worth the money.

    Their Silkener starts at $300. That means if your hair is 2 inches long its $300 and if its 10 inches long it will be $300+.

    Touch ups start at $300-they recommend a touch up every 3 months

    Cuts start at $125

    Conditioners range from $50-150 (no its not included in the cost of the silkener :? )

    Consultations are $75 which can only be applied to your service if you get something done to your hair the same day (this may have gone up)

    You have to give them your credit card number to make an appointment

    Your hair has to be completely product free when you go for a consultation or they charge an additional fee.
  • msjokermsjoker Posts: 1,658Registered Users
    BlackBerri wrote:
    Their Silkener starts at $300. That means if your hair is 2 inches long its $300 and if its 10 inches long it will be $300+.


    That's a lot of money :shock:
    "It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
  • MeyerGirlMeyerGirl Posts: 170Registered Users
    Wow those are some serious prices. The cost really went up on all services. Edited because I was being mean.. I used to like that place :-(
    4a, deep waves and pensprings.
    Boots Pink Curl Creme for sale, Please PM me.
  • st. louis bluest. louis blue Posts: 404Registered Users
    !?!??!!!

    Those Curve girls have gone all the way crazy.

    This is really, really mean, but as far as I'm concerned, they can go under, charging people that much to apply some glycerin to their hair.

    Plus, I just don't like how hostile they come off: DON'T.COME.IN.HERE. WITH.PRODUCT.IN!!! THREE-HUNDRED-DOLLAR PENALTY!!!

    It's not like they're offering rare medical treatment. They're offering haircuts.

    And quite frankly, I don't even think their haircuts are all that great; they're ok, but they are not spectacular. Who wears their hair combed into their face in the style of nearly every before-and-after on their site? Please.
  • msjokermsjoker Posts: 1,658Registered Users
    !?!??!!!

    Those Curve girls have gone all the way crazy.

    This is really, really mean, but as far as I'm concerned, they can go under, charging people that much to apply some glycerin to their hair.

    Plus, I just don't like how hostile they come off: DON'T.COME.IN.HERE. WITH.PRODUCT.IN!!! THREE-HUNDRED-DOLLAR PENALTY!!!

    It's not like they're offering rare medical treatment. They're offering haircuts.

    And quite frankly, I don't even think their haircuts are all that great; they're ok, but they are not spectacular. Who wears their hair combed into their face in the style of nearly every before-and-after on their site? Please.

    LMAO! And they're based in Brooklyn, right? So I'm sure it costs them a lot cheaper than if they set-up shop in Manhattan. [email protected] hair combed into their face. I'm surprised they don't charge for the shingling/twistout 101.
    "It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
  • CurlygoddessCurlygoddess Posts: 287Registered Users
    OMG!!! You guys are terrible!!!!
    OK yes I agree the prices are expensive. especially for the products and the ingredients are nothing special (especially to the ladies on this board who know their stuff) But come on now lets be fair and look at other salons and what they charge. Batia and Aleeza are not cheap - for their hair cuts anyway the charge about $350 , their gel is 18.50 for a bottle is that for 8 oz? This ends up being almost the $38 for 16 oz that Curve is charging. How much are Ouidad and Devacurl cuts and products? Ouidad has a softener which is also expensive.

    When you have a brick and mortar business esp. a hair salon you have rent, insurance, leased or purchased equipment (hood dryers) Curve Salon has employees, insurance for employees, workmans comp, overhead like electricity, hot water. These are just a few of the expenses that come to mind off the top of my head.
    They also offer services for those of us with a tighter curl pattern that not too many other salons offer - helping ethnic women with un-loced/un-braided natural hair style and manage their hair. I cant think of another salon that offers the services and I think they know that.
    Most salons want to slap a perm in your hair or hot comb it to death or if you go to a salon for natural hair they want to put you in some braid or curly extensions or help you grow locs. Curve knows how to style curly hair and many other places can not. They may be out there but they are probably not as popular as Curve.
    Let me also add I have never been to Curve and I only tried a sample of the Curly Pudding which I really did not like all that much but I am just trying to provide another angle as to why their prices for products and services are so much.
    Thick coarse 4b hair. Holy Grail: Kinky-Curly Curling Custard. Trying to grow it to bra strap length. Currently collar bone length.
  • msjokermsjoker Posts: 1,658Registered Users
    Are Batia and Aleeza, Ouidad and DevaCurl located in Brooklyn?
    "It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
  • CurlygoddessCurlygoddess Posts: 287Registered Users
    msjoker wrote:
    Are Batia and Aleeza, Ouidad and DevaCurl located in Brooklyn?
    girl noooo!!!!
    Batia and Aleeza are in Beverly Hills, Ouidad somewhere in manhattan and DevaCurl too.
    I am so slow.....I just answered you and now I realized you are trying to be funny but I get it, Brooklyn rent is much cheaper than Beverly Hills or Manhattan,

    Yanai Van charges $120 for a cut and style from his Beverly Hills salon
    Devachan/DevaCurl charges $75 if you get a cut by a junior stylist and $90-125 for a senior stylist and to have Lorraine massey cut your hair costs $225 and up depending on what you want. But there are other salons that can cater to 2a-3a curly hair. Curve kinda is the only popular salon that can cut and style highly textured hair in its natural state. I say popular b/c I am sure there are others that can do the same if not a better job perhaps. but Curve has been all up in Essence, Oprah and Vibe Vixen Magazines and I am sure they have a publicist they have to pay a lot of money to each month.

    Bottom line they have a lot of overhead costs and according to the article I read in Vibe Vixen they bust their a$$es and work very hard - 13 hour days! On your feet, styling hair! dealing with customers - mostly black women too - and you know how we are when it comes to our hair especially after spending all of that money

    They provide a service that is truly needed, many women dont know how to style and care for their natural hair.
    Thick coarse 4b hair. Holy Grail: Kinky-Curly Curling Custard. Trying to grow it to bra strap length. Currently collar bone length.
  • msjokermsjoker Posts: 1,658Registered Users
    Bottom line they have a lot of overhead costs and according to the article I read in Vibe Vixen they bust their a$$es and work very hard - 13 hour days! On your feet, styling hair! dealing with customers - mostly black women too - and you know how we are when it comes to our hair especially after spending all of that money

    They provide a service that is truly needed, many women dont know how to style and care for their natural hair.

    I know a lot of stylists who also work 13 hour days; some, even more. However, their marketing strategies are smart I guess....since the majority of black women are obessesed with length and their slogan 'turn kinks to curls' is also smart because that implies that kinky hair is bad and curly hair is good and so on and so on..... :roll:
    "It moisturizes my situation... preserves my sexy."
  • BlackBerriBlackBerri Posts: 12Registered Users
    LMAO
    me and my cuz thought we were the only people hating on that hair in your face style.:D
    I agree that they offer a service that is rare, but honestly there isn't that much overhead in the world. They do not pay anymore for water, gas, light than a place that does perms all day. Plus they are located in a tiny row house in a regular class part of Brooklyn, so its not like they are paying boo-koo rent.

    I'm not trying to knock their hustle bc there are difinitely people out there that will pay that type of $$$. However, I think its just WAY too expensive.
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    I admire their business acumen, but disagree that they are teaching women with kinky/nappy/tightly coiled hair how to care for it and style it. Look at the site. Plus, not one technique they are offering is original or wasn't well-established before they came along. If you doubt me, get "Let's Talk Hair" by Pam Ferrell or Tulani Kinard's "No Lye!". That's where I first saw twist outs and small two strand twists and coiling applied to natural hair. I bought both of those books early on when I went natural. They focus on care of natural hair, styling and how to make it healthy as possible.

    Curve has good PR. They also capitalize on the disappointment many black women who go natural have when they realize they don't have Rachel True or Gloria Ruben's hair pattern/type/texture. There's nothing on their site which they offer or appears to suggest that being "nappy" can be beautiful or is fine as it is. In some ways, they're sending the same message many black women have been fed for years by the relaxer industry.

    I don't dislike them b/c I don't know them. I haven't been there. They provide a service people want at prices the market is willing to bear for the services they provide, the perceived quality of the services and the cache of saying you went there. Good for them. They're in business to make a living/profit, not to provide charity. So, people are free not to go to them if they don't want to. So, being resentful or angry at their prices for being prohibitive for some having access to the salon doesn't make sense to me. I will say, though, I found my hairperson and salon through a mention in In-Style magazine and I can get out of there for $110 for a trim/cut and color.
  • CurlygoddessCurlygoddess Posts: 287Registered Users
    Discgirl wrote:
    I admire their business acumen, but disagree that they are teaching women with kinky/nappy/tightly coiled hair how to care for it and style it. Look at the site. Plus, not one technique they are offering is original or wasn't well-established before they came along. If you doubt me, get "Let's Talk Hair" by Pam Ferrell or Tulani Kinard's "No Lye!". That's where I first saw twist outs and small two strand twists and coiling applied to natural hair. I bought both of those books early on when I went natural. They focus on care of natural hair, styling and how to make it healthy as possible.

    Curve has good PR. They also capitalize on the disappointment many black women who go natural have when they realize they don't have Rachel True or Gloria Ruben's hair pattern/type/texture. There's nothing on their site which they offer or appears to suggest that being "nappy" can be beautiful or is fine as it is. In some ways, they're sending the same message many black women have been fed for years by the relaxer industry.

    I don't dislike them b/c I don't know them. I haven't been there. They provide a service people want at prices the market is willing to bear for the services they provide, the perceived quality of the services and the cache of saying you went there. Good for them. They're in business to make a living/profit, not to provide charity. So, people are free not to go to them if they don't want to. So, being resentful or angry at their prices for being prohibitive for some having access to the salon doesn't make sense to me. I will say, though, I found my hairperson and salon through a mention in In-Style magazine and I can get out of there for $110 for a trim/cut and color.

    I agree with you 100% Discgirl the techniques are nothing new but many women are not familar with them .How many women reach for a book when deciding to go natural? I have heard about the different ways to style your hair but only from websites like this one or NP.com. Black women are more likely to pick up a magazine and read about what products to use or visit a salon like Curve who can help them get hair like Rachel True or Scary Spice. I read a lot and I have never even heard about the two books that you mentioned. Its a shame since it probably would have saved me some time and effort when I was transitioning. I definitely have to check them out. Thank you for mentioning them!

    Like you said Curve is in business to make money and people are free to go to them and spend their hard earned money or not. With the entire cosmetic industry there is no money to be made by saying that someone is beautiful or fine as they are - you always need another product to make you more beautiful. Curve knows this and they capitalize on that fact just like a lot of other hair or beauty products for sale out there.
    sad but at least some people realize it.
    Thick coarse 4b hair. Holy Grail: Kinky-Curly Curling Custard. Trying to grow it to bra strap length. Currently collar bone length.
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    I can't sleep. Anyways, no one told me about the two books I mentioned. I found them through research. I had to have Borders special order one for me. Part of it was I made a promise to myself when I took my braids out that I would learn how to work with and care for my natural hair. The problem was I was clueless. So, I had braids put back in and wore them for another month to give myself time to find resources to help me. It's one of the ways I found this site. At first, I got caught up when people were asking about the texturizer of the minute and asked questions. Luckily for me, I never took that step. Every time I've ever thought about putting a relaxer of any type on my head I remember the chemical burn to my scalp that motivated me to put my hair in braids in the first place. Sometime during my braid stint, I swore "never again" to put my health at risk like that. Maybe, one day I'll change my mind, but I can't see that happening right now.

    I found those two books through internet searches and by going to bookstores and looking over their health and beauty shelves.

    Pamela Ferrell has made plenty of money and been successful teaching women how to care for and work with their natural hair sans chemicals. She's big on teaching women to love and appreciate their hair in its natural state and its versatility.
  • CherishCherish Posts: 1,847Registered Users
    Agreeing with Discgirl.

    My hair experiences are similar in that I had cut off relaxers in the past, to a twa, but didn't know what to do with my hair beyond wearing braids. With the last chop, I grew it out quite a bit, but didn't want to just keep wearing braids, so I searched for "black hair care", and found the original (but now defunct) blackhaircare discussion board, which eventually led me to NC as well.

    Back then, people were more patient to learn their hair traits, and people were not as hung up on the words of a hairdresser who relaxes Oprah's hair (Andre). His hair types were used, but not worshipped... and dividing discussions by type would have been a laughable concept. When a newbie joined, they were immediately advised to get books like the ones Discgirl mentioned.. "Let's Talk Hair", "Kid's Talk Hair", etc. Hair talk was geared towards acceptance, patience and knowledge, believing that armed with those, one could set and achieve reasonable hair goals. There was also more of an emphasis on kitchen chemistry experimentation and natural products/ingredients.

    It seems to me that hair care has now become synonymous with testing out the product du jour, and finding an Andre hair twin.

    I guess either the old ways did not work or were too slow for many, or the motivations for giving up relaxers/texturizers have gradually changed, because I think there had to have been a void that salons like Curve are now filling.

    For most old schoolers like me though, their implied premise is the antithesis of natural hair care.
  • alguma pessoaalguma pessoa Posts: 619Registered Users
    I got the BC there before they were really popular and super expensive. Discgirl and those who said similar things are correct with their assessment. Also, their salon is the first floor of their brownstone in a residential neighborhood. There is no real bathroom, it is a converted closet. One or both of the sisters live upstairs. They charge those prices because they created this belief that they are experts and tightly curled hair needs to be fixed (i.e., not pretty enough in its natural state) and they are the only ones with the solution to turn your kinks into curls.

    As someone who has been there, save your money. They make you feel that you need them and their products but in reality, you do not. They do not help you understand your hair but how to "fix" it with their products. They do not spend a lot of time cutting or styling your hair. Everyone gets the same cookie-cutter cut, sent to be washed and conditioned, and have their products slathered on and then you are sent to roast under the hood dryer for an hour or two. When I was there, it was like an assembly line and not very personable to individual hair needs.


    Those women are not great stylists but they are very good at marketing/PR. It is very sad that their success came from continuing to make tightly curled hair women feel that bouncy loose curls are prettier than tightly curled hair.
    We're all born mad. Some remain so.

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  • BlackBerriBlackBerri Posts: 12Registered Users
    I agree with the previous post 100%. Although i have never been to curves, I know 2 people that went there years ago. The fist person had her hair colored there bc she was natural and wanted to get it done by "experts". Her hair was bleached too light and they had to go back and do a corrective. To make a long story short, it overprocessed her hair to the point that it began to break off and she eventually had to do a big chop. This experience cost over $200.

    The other chick I know said that she also felt that she was on an assembly line and that she didn't receive personalized care. Although she told them that she NEVER wears her hair on her face -that was still the style she got. She also didn't know that conditioners were extra since most stylist automatically condition your hair bc your hair needs to be conditioned after a chemical (she got a silkener). When they asked her if she wanted a conditioner -she said yes. That experience cost her over $500 .

    Again I am not haitin' on anyone's hustle or business savvy. The customers on there site all have big smiles on thier face so I'm sure they are happy with the results. My comments were directed to those who wanted to know the prices and the person who thought the prices were high because of rent and maintainance. I'm sure many of us could afford to go to Curves. But I personally feel that a plus of being natural is NOT having to spend alot $$$$
  • CurlyLdyDTCurlyLdyDT Posts: 72Registered Users
    <<I'm sure many of us could afford to go to Curves. But I personally feel that a plus of being natural is NOT having to spend alot $$$$>>

    Okay, I admit that I peruse the pages of the Curves website looking longing at the hair I want to have, but there is no way I would pay that much money for anyone to do my hair. A $200 - $500 salon visit is insane, not to mention the travel costs if you don't live in or near NYC. I do think those ladies are gouging the market, as I think most hair salons, hair product companies do. Wouldn't it be better to make your product and services more affordable to more people to ensure that your business stays around longer? They charge more for a consulatation ($75) than I've ever paid for salon visit and that was for a relaxer, conditioner, cut, style and the tip!

    I'm not so sure about not spending a lot of $$$ as a natural. Letting my relaxer go has make me a certifed product junkie, hair recipe maker, amateur Internet researcher. I have spent $$ on natural oils, conditioners, styling products, hair tools, you name it. I have probably spent the equivalent on my yearly salon visits on hair products in the last year. And I spend hours looking the HG product online that will give me the hair I truly want without breaking my bank like the Curve Salon and their products.

    I think the other thing that disappoints me about the Curve Salon is the exclusivity they build into business. Call months in advance for an appointment, send a fee upfront, come to us with no product in your hair or you will have to pay us, we'll make your hair manageable, but pay us for the conditioner, your hair will be carefree, as long as you use our stuff, a silkener is your answer, but make sure you come to us 4x a year at $200+ a visit so we can manage your curly hair. It's really a bit sickening. And as my husband just pointed out to me, you could pay for Lasik eye surgery, which last forever, for the same cost as couple of trips to this salon plus product costs.
    LadyDeeTee
    "Never under underestimate the power of a
    LADY!"
    Last relaxer: 8/04; Partial BC: 10/04; 4a/b hair- earlobe length when blow dried and flat ironed
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    One of the things they are selling is cache and uniqueness/exclusivity. It's no different than haute couture. You're not trying to reach the masses or do them a favor by being affordable and accessible. You're trying to establish that what you have is the most special and unique and worth the money. Christian Dior hasn't gone out of the haute couture business and neither will Curve Salon.

    The amount of money one spends when she goes natural, just like when she is relaxing her hair, is about choice. If a person chooses to spend $300 a month looking for a holy grail product that will turn her "Type 4" hair into something else, she's probably going to spend more than if she simply chemically altered it to achieve that goal and maintained it chemically. The amount a person spends also depends on the degree to which she is willing to take responsibility of caring for her own hair and deciding to make up her mind to work with it, see what can and cannot be achieved, and to get out of the mindset that any one "type" of hair is better than another. It's not. I can't make my hair "type 3" hair anymore than I can make myself an Inuit. That's perfectly fine with me. If I keep searching around for something to magically make me Inuit, I will wind up flat broke, miserable and completely disappointed with who I am.

    As far as Curve's policy regarding deposits and pricing structure it's not that extreme compared with a leading, established natural hair salon relying upon it's status, perceived/actual expertise or cache.

    www.cornrowsandco.com/salonAppointment.cfm
  • alguma pessoaalguma pessoa Posts: 619Registered Users
    CurlyLdyDT wrote:
    come to us with no product in your hair or you will have to pay us.

    I believe they want you to come without product so that they can see what your natural hair looks like without manipulation. When I used to relax this one stylist wet and then dry my roots to see how my hair curled naturally. Also, if they have to take out braids, etc. that takes away time that they could be spending with other clients. Those demands seem reasonable.


    Their deposit demand seem standard for salons like that. Many ordinary salons in my area request the same for all services over a certain amount because people bail out at the last minute and since the salons are not walk-in the salon will lose money.

    The thing that gets me is that they are trying to be exclusive but they are not that good stylists. I also think there is such a drastic difference between the before and afters is that in the before they puff up your hair really big and your hair is without product. The after is slightly damp and heavy with product. I think the people who are getting the texturizers are duped by the before and after pictures.

    This is what they did to me. First one sister cut off my texturized hair. Then she puffed my hair really big. Then I got it cut, "styled," and after sitting under the dryer for over an hour (my hair was still not dry) the other sister blowdried it with the nozzle for a few minutes and they took my picture. I remember that it was still damp. I thought it looked good, too! Looking back I look like all of the other clients and this was a few years ago. :( :lol:

    I asked them about the silkener. They told me that a silkener was a chemical and since I just cut out the texturizer and had a pretty texture naturally they did not recommend it. They did push their products.
    We're all born mad. Some remain so.

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