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Palin's "going rogue"..

yagottaloveyacurlsyagottaloveyacurls Posts: 5,766Registered Users
Palin's going rogue, a McCain aide says...
"She is a diva. She takes no advice from anyone," said this McCain adviser

niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiice.
just what we need.
"Also, she is playing for her own future and sees herself as the next leader of the party. Remember: Divas trust only unto themselves, as they see themselves as the beginning and end of all wisdom."


well, *snap* ain't that just frikkin' fantabulous?
Me thinks the distance between her beginning and her end isn't too far.
"She's no longer playing for 2008; she's playing 2012," Democratic pollster Peter Hart said. "And the difficulty is, when she went on 'Saturday Night Live,' she became a reinforcement of her caricature. She never allowed herself to be vetted, and at the end of the day, voters turned against her both in terms of qualifications and personally."

Comments

  • MissCurlyCueMissCurlyCue Posts: 145Registered Users
    Palin's going rogue, a McCain aide says...
    "She is a diva. She takes no advice from anyone," said this McCain adviser

    niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiice.
    just what we need.
    "Also, she is playing for her own future and sees herself as the next leader of the party. Remember: Divas trust only unto themselves, as they see themselves as the beginning and end of all wisdom."


    well, *snap* ain't that just frikkin' fantabulous?
    Me thinks the distance between her beginning and her end isn't too far.
    "She's no longer playing for 2008; she's playing 2012," Democratic pollster Peter Hart said. "And the difficulty is, when she went on 'Saturday Night Live,' she became a reinforcement of her caricature. She never allowed herself to be vetted, and at the end of the day, voters turned against her both in terms of qualifications and personally."


    As a veteran, the prospect of her being president and commander in chief really frightens me. The country used to have intellectual and very educated/aware leaders. This woman couldn't even mention a newspaper she reads or any of Bush's policies.

    If it's so damn important for her to be a woman, why can't they find a woman conservative who is intelligent and can hold her own?? They do exist... :banghead:

    Palin is a perfect example of the misuse of affirmative action for women.

    (Remember, women are included in the affirmative action umbrella and one particular segment of women are the main beneficiaries of affirmative action.)

    The Republican party should find a conservative woman who is qualified and educated.
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  • YolyCYolyC Posts: 3,758Registered Users
    How McCain couldn't have seen this coming is beyond me.


    You know what though, I still want to hear what she has to say. I'm glad she's turning on them and saying what's on her mind and what she believes. I figure her comments might convince those "undecided" folks that she either truly doesn't know jack or that she is too extreme for them. Either way it's a win-win for the Obama side.
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  • SarcasmIsBeautySarcasmIsBeauty Posts: 5,640Registered Users
    YolyC wrote: »
    How McCain couldn't have seen this coming is beyond me.


    You know what though, I still want to hear what she has to say. I'm glad she's turning on them and saying what's on her mind and what she believes. I figure her comments might convince those "undecided" folks that she either truly doesn't know jack or that she is too extreme for them. Either way it's a win-win for the Obama side.

    ITA, this woman who in my most honest opinion is a freaking nutjob and out of touch with the people and reality needs to let her true colors show. The Republicans need to let her go on interviews unscripted with the regular bs. Of course they won't but I just wish they would. People say Obama doesn't answer questions and Biden has the foot in mouth syndrome but at least they go on interviews and can hold their own!
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  • wavezncurlzwavezncurlz Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    But I think this is part of the plan for McCain. Now that things look bad, they are letting the pit bull out so she can look worse. Then they can blame her in the end for losing the race - she was going rogue, she's a diva, she's in it for 2012...

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  • redcelticcurlsredcelticcurls Posts: 17,502Registered Users
    Palin's going rogue, a McCain aide says...
    "She is a diva. She takes no advice from anyone," said this McCain adviser

    niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiice.
    just what we need.




    well, *snap* ain't that just frikkin' fantabulous?
    Me thinks the distance between her beginning and her end isn't too far.
    "She's no longer playing for 2008; she's playing 2012," Democratic pollster Peter Hart said. "And the difficulty is, when she went on 'Saturday Night Live,' she became a reinforcement of her caricature. She never allowed herself to be vetted, and at the end of the day, voters turned against her both in terms of qualifications and personally."


    As a veteran, the prospect of her being president and commander in chief really frightens me. The country used to have intellectual and very educated/aware leaders. This woman couldn't even mention a newspaper she reads or any of Bush's policies.

    If it's so damn important for her to be a woman, why can't they find a woman conservative who is intelligent and can hold her own?? They do exist... :banghead:

    Palin is a perfect example of the misuse of affirmative action for women.

    (Remember, women are included in the affirmative action umbrella and one particular segment of women are the main beneficiaries of affirmative action.)

    The Republican party should find a conservative woman who is qualified and educated.


    ITA with the bolded. Good grief. There are plenty far more qualifeid Republican women out there. I have to wonder what the hell they are thinking? Is it that they aren't good looking enough?
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  • amy51373amy51373 Posts: 1,204Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    She's the main reason I'm not voting Republican. If they had a better VP candidate, maybe, but the thought of her taking office if something happens to McCain scares me. They could have found any number of more intelligent women if they were dead set on having a woman VP candidate.
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  • geminigemini Posts: 3,325Registered Users
    ITA with the bolded. Good grief. There are plenty far more qualifeid Republican women out there. I have to wonder what the hell they are thinking? Is it that they aren't good looking enough?

    This is what I think too.
    The governor of Hawaii would have been a good pick if they insisted on having a woman VP--she is popular in the state and has held the office since 2002.
  • redcelticcurlsredcelticcurls Posts: 17,502Registered Users
    gemini wrote: »
    ITA with the bolded. Good grief. There are plenty far more qualifeid Republican women out there. I have to wonder what the hell they are thinking? Is it that they aren't good looking enough?

    This is what I think too.
    The governor of Hawaii would have been a good pick if they insisted on having a woman VP--she is popular in the state and has held the office since 2002.


    From what I've read of her, she seems effective, but she'd hardly appease the evangelical base since she's Jewish - which I could see as having a role in ruling her out.
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  • geminigemini Posts: 3,325Registered Users
    gemini wrote: »
    ITA with the bolded. Good grief. There are plenty far more qualifeid Republican women out there. I have to wonder what the hell they are thinking? Is it that they aren't good looking enough?

    This is what I think too.
    The governor of Hawaii would have been a good pick if they insisted on having a woman VP--she is popular in the state and has held the office since 2002.


    From what I've read of her, she seems effective, but she'd hardly appease the evangelical base since she's Jewish - which I could see as having a role in ruling her out.

    Yeah, I agree--it is unfortunate though. Picking someone like Lingle probably would have drawn some of the Hillary supporters that they hoped to take by selecting Palin, though. I just wish the GOP would see that they would have a better chance of getting more people to vote that way if they stopped catering to the religious right. Until that stops, I don't think I could consider voting for them on a national level.
  • CottonCandyCurlsCottonCandyCurls Posts: 344Registered Users
    It's so amusing to hear Obama voters critique McCain for who he should have picked for VP. I mean really so impartial. I think Obama's chances of winning are actually overstated. If Hillary was on the ticket McCain would have been finished and Palin would not even be up to bat. Regardless of what "unnamed McCain aide" thinks about Palin, their ticket represents a real unraveling of the Reagan Revolution. McCain is the liberal country-club Republican set and Palin is the evangelical blue-collar Republican set. I wouldn't say she's going rogue but that they are a Frankenstein ticket that just aren't going to agree on a whole lot.

    McCain didn't have a decisive win for the Republican nomination there were just more wings of the party splitting up the vote. I still would not underestimate this woman. It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.
  • SarcasmIsBeautySarcasmIsBeauty Posts: 5,640Registered Users
    Hillary was on the ticket McCain would have been finished and Palin would not even be up to bat. Regardless of what "unnamed McCain aide" thinks about Palin, their ticket represents a real unraveling of the Reagan Revolution. McCain is the liberal country-club Republican set and Palin is the evangelical blue-collar Republican set. I wouldn't say she's going rogue but that they are a Frankenstein ticket that just aren't going to agree on a whole lot.

    McCain didn't have a decisive win for the Republican nomination there were just more wings of the party splitting up the vote. I still would not underestimate this woman. It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.

    If Hillary was on the ticket I truly believe McCain wouldn't have chosen Palin, it wouldn't give him the competitive edge that it has given him now.

    I hope for the future and best interest of this country that woman NEVER EVER EVER gets to be in such an esteemed position with so much responsibility. She is a detriment to us all.
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  • CurlyGina2CurlyGina2 Posts: 1,048Registered Users
    It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.

    It's nice that you like her and would vote her into office. But hearing stuff like this scares the crap out of me.
  • PoodleheadPoodlehead Posts: 6,959Registered Users
    I just want this all to be over, and for her to go away.
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  • YolyCYolyC Posts: 3,758Registered Users
    It's so amusing to hear Obama voters critique McCain for who he should have picked for VP. I mean really so impartial. I think Obama's chances of winning are actually overstated. If Hillary was on the ticket McCain would have been finished and Palin would not even be up to bat. Regardless of what "unnamed McCain aide" thinks about Palin, their ticket represents a real unraveling of the Reagan Revolution. McCain is the liberal country-club Republican set and Palin is the evangelical blue-collar Republican set. I wouldn't say she's going rogue but that they are a Frankenstein ticket that just aren't going to agree on a whole lot.

    McCain didn't have a decisive win for the Republican nomination there were just more wings of the party splitting up the vote. I still would not underestimate this woman. It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.

    I agree with the bolded. I'm glad to see that the Obama camp hasn't fallen into some sort of complacency mode. I'm glad they are pushing ahead because honestly, this is seems too good to be true for the Democrats.

    As for Palin, since day one, it seemed odd that they weren't letting her speak. One had to wonder how different her opinions were from McCain's. Honestly, I don't care for her but I'm glad she's speaking up. Not only for the reasons I mentioned in the other post. Whether I agree with her or not, I'm glad she's standing up for her self and letting them know, that she has her own ideas. She's not "Barbie" and she can't be pushed around.

    I still wonder why the McCain camp thought that would be possible, if it was because she doesn't know much or or because she's a woman?
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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "If you don't stand for something you will fall for anything."
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  • geminigemini Posts: 3,325Registered Users
    YolyC wrote: »
    It's so amusing to hear Obama voters critique McCain for who he should have picked for VP. I mean really so impartial. I think Obama's chances of winning are actually overstated. If Hillary was on the ticket McCain would have been finished and Palin would not even be up to bat. Regardless of what "unnamed McCain aide" thinks about Palin, their ticket represents a real unraveling of the Reagan Revolution. McCain is the liberal country-club Republican set and Palin is the evangelical blue-collar Republican set. I wouldn't say she's going rogue but that they are a Frankenstein ticket that just aren't going to agree on a whole lot.

    McCain didn't have a decisive win for the Republican nomination there were just more wings of the party splitting up the vote. I still would not underestimate this woman. It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.

    I agree with the bolded. I'm glad to see that the Obama camp hasn't fallen into some sort of complacency mode. I'm glad they are pushing ahead because honestly, this is seems too good to be true for the Democrats.

    As for Palin, since day one, it seemed odd that they weren't letting her speak. One had to wonder how different her opinions were from McCain's. Honestly, I don't care for her but I'm glad she's speaking up. Not only for the reasons I mentioned in the other post. Whether I agree with her or not, I'm glad she's standing up for her self and letting them know, that she has her own ideas. She's not "Barbie" and she can't be pushed around.

    I still wonder why the McCain camp thought that would be possible, if it was because she doesn't know much or or because she's a woman?

    I agree with the bolded as well. My point was that the GOP might have more success reaching closer to the middle; I think there are more voters there and the party would have a brighter future if it was more inclusive. Instead the scope seems to be getting narrower.
  • CottonCandyCurlsCottonCandyCurls Posts: 344Registered Users
    CurlyGina2 wrote: »
    It is highly likely that she will be a future president. Anyone who thinks she hasn't been considered since her mayoral days doesn't know much about the Republican Party's ambitions.

    It's nice that you like her and would vote her into office. But hearing stuff like this scares the crap out of me.

    I haven't made a full opinion about her just about the overreaction she has generated. But she has a lot of things working to her advantage. Since we are nearing Halloween here's an article you may or may not have read. Depending on your political persuasion it's a trick or a treat./home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.huffingtonpost.com%2Fgeorge-lakoff%2Fthe-palin-choice-and-the_b_123012.html" class="Popup.

    Oh and for those who bemoan her doggone accent.
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.motherjones.com%2Fmojoblog%2Farchives%2F2008%2F10%2F10079_mojo-audio-sarah-palin-accent.html" class="Popup
  • CottonCandyCurlsCottonCandyCurls Posts: 344Registered Users
    gemini wrote: »
    I agree with the bolded as well. My point was that the GOP might have more success reaching closer to the middle; I think there are more voters there and the party would have a brighter future if it was more inclusive. Instead the scope seems to be getting narrower.

    Well it's the law of political physics. There are Democrats that feel the pendulum has swung farther left with Obama as the Republicans swing farther right. What's interesting is Clinton and Bush both represent a kind of political poaching and triangulation. I think the real center is more libertarian in nature. People don't want to much meddling in their wallets or bedrooms. Who knows what 2012 will bring.
  • mad scientistmad scientist Posts: 3,530Registered Users
    Well it's the law of political physics. There are Democrats that feel the pendulum has swung farther left with Obama as the Republicans swing farther right. What's interesting is Clinton and Bush both represent a kind of political poaching and triangulation. I think the real center is more libertarian in nature. People don't want to much meddling in their wallets or bedrooms. Who knows what 2012 will bring.

    I agree with you there. Which is also why I don't think that Palin will be president in 2012. I think this election is going divorce the fiscal conservatives from the social conservatives, with the fiscal conservatives reinventing themselves under some sort of Libertarian standard.
  • EllaElla Posts: 392Registered Users
    gemini wrote: »
    I agree with the bolded as well. My point was that the GOP might have more success reaching closer to the middle; I think there are more voters there and the party would have a brighter future if it was more inclusive. Instead the scope seems to be getting narrower.

    Well it's the law of political physics. There are Democrats that feel the pendulum has swung farther left with Obama as the Republicans swing farther right. What's interesting is Clinton and Bush both represent a kind of political poaching and triangulation. I think the real center is more libertarian in nature. People don't want to much meddling in their wallets or bedrooms. Who knows what 2012 will bring.

    I really hope so, but are there truly that many people willing to forego the security and comfort of the nanny state for the freedom of personal responsibility? Government doesn't always invade your life like a StormTrooper, sometimes it erodes your freedom a drop at a time like a slow leak destroying the foundation of a house.
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  • geminigemini Posts: 3,325Registered Users
    Well it's the law of political physics. There are Democrats that feel the pendulum has swung farther left with Obama as the Republicans swing farther right. What's interesting is Clinton and Bush both represent a kind of political poaching and triangulation. I think the real center is more libertarian in nature. People don't want to much meddling in their wallets or bedrooms. Who knows what 2012 will bring.

    I agree with you there. Which is also why I don't think that Palin will be president in 2012. I think this election is going divorce the fiscal conservatives from the social conservatives, with the fiscal conservatives reinventing themselves under some sort of Libertarian standard.

    I agree too.
  • CottonCandyCurlsCottonCandyCurls Posts: 344Registered Users
    Ella wrote: »
    gemini wrote: »
    I agree with the bolded as well. My point was that the GOP might have more success reaching closer to the middle; I think there are more voters there and the party would have a brighter future if it was more inclusive. Instead the scope seems to be getting narrower.

    Well it's the law of political physics. There are Democrats that feel the pendulum has swung farther left with Obama as the Republicans swing farther right. What's interesting is Clinton and Bush both represent a kind of political poaching and triangulation. I think the real center is more libertarian in nature. People don't want to much meddling in their wallets or bedrooms. Who knows what 2012 will bring.

    I really hope so, but are there truly that many people willing to forego the security and comfort of the nanny state for the freedom of personal responsibility? Government doesn't always invade your life like a StormTrooper, sometimes it erodes your freedom a drop at a time like a slow leak destroying the foundation of a house.

    I'm going to have to go with Goldwater on this and say it's embedded in America's national character. We might slip up sometimes but good leadership puts people to task. I don't think anyone truly enjoys being irresponsible or dependent. It's the burden of the party who wants to attract new people to show them why their system is better and what benefits it brings. I'm not seeing that articulated or demonstrated. The Bush adminstration and the bailout is case in point.

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