Considering relocation to New England

curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
I have job interviews in New Hampshire and Vermont in two weeks. Couldn't get flights to Burlington or Manchester, so I'm flying into Boston.

Anyway, what's it like in NH and VT, besides just cold in winter? How expensive/inexpensive is it to live there? I'm searching for info online, but anecdotal info is always welcome.

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.

Comments

  • ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
    Vermont is lovely...from what I have seen.

    A coworker of mine used to live in VT and loved it. He mentioned that he bought a great house at a great price (maybe 5 or 6 years ago) and that his commute wasn't too bad.

    It is on my list of places to live one day.

    I think Mailgirl lives in VT, so hopefully she will chime in with information.
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
  • NetGNetG Posts: 8,116Registered Users
    The area you're looking in NH will definitely be more expensive than where you are. I think VT most likely will be as well, but not sure.

    You'll be a longer distance from shipping routes, and have less ability to get fresh produce and fish, because while the coast isn't that many miles as the crow flies, there are windy roads around mountains to get to where you are from Boston.

    Absolutely beautiful area.... but I'm back in the Southwest because I like it better here! You can PM me for any info you want (that I can give), or if you still have my email you can email me...
    The pews never miss a sermon but that doesn't get them one step closer to Heaven.
    -Speckla

    But at least the pews never attend yoga!
  • curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Thanks for the replies.

    PM coming, NetG.

    "In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

    4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
  • GuardianBGuardianB Posts: 1,905Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I've lived in NH pretty much my whole life and I've had time or relatives at all 4 points in the state so I can give you a rundown of any questions you have depending on where you are going. I have family now living outside of Burlington VT too and while I don't "know" the area I sort of familar with how things look and feel from an outsiders perspective.

    There are NO cities in NH/VT/ME. Boston is nearest and really it. In comparision to other areas of the country Manchester is NOT a city. Now for us it's big but all is relative. Same with Burlington.

    No sales tax or income tax in NH but there is a high property tax. Of course renters don't see that so badly. It depends on where you are going to be but rents for a 1-2 bedroom apartment can range from about $800-$2000. Again, depends how far and how big you go. I would say cost of living is average to slightly above for most things. Groceries are a little lower. Gas and tolls and entertainment a little higher.

    Not much entertainment really unless you like small stuff or outside stuff. You are not going to find dance clubs and athletic gyms or complexs at every corner. You will need to travel. Having a vehicle is imperative. Public transportaion is virtually non existant and walking except to only the most local places IF you are in one of those "cities" hubs isn't something to rely on.

    Yes, get your cold weather parka and snow boots but the summers can be quiet warm with some tough humidity.

    People are generally friendly though. They'll stop to help someone change a tire. Crime is much lower. Schools are excellent. Traffic is not bad except maybe for 30 minutes around rush in and out of work. Dunkin Donuts coffee is the brew. You'll never be more than 15minutes from a quiet patch of trees if you wanted to get away. There are 4 seasons. There is ocean or lakes, mountains, fields, cows, and fresh apples, maple syrup and lobster.
    ~Two friends, one soul inspired~ anonymous
  • xcptnlxcptnl Posts: 15,678Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    What areas are you interviewing in? I grew up in NH and my territory for my job is Vermont so I am pretty familiar with that state as well (lots and lots of travel to towns I never knew existed before this job!!). I will say - if you are coming from a metropolitan area now - VT & NH will be a culture shock as you can have a 1/2 hour or more drive to the nearest store depending upon where you are. Even myself (I live in Western Mass which is more like NH & VT than eastern Mass) have a 20 minute drive to get to a Target store. :sad3:
    Central Massachusetts

    One good reason to only maintain a small circle of friends is that three out of four murders are committed by people who know the victim. ~George Carlin~

    In regards to Vagazzling: They just want to get into the goods without worrying about getting scratched up by fake crystals. ~spring1onu~
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    I'm pretty sure Manchester/Burlington/Portland/Portsmouth and such all qualify as cities. Are they big cities? No. But they are cities. Now I'm not sure where you're coming from but there will probably most def. be some culture shock. I wouldn't worry too much about the fresh produce. You won't be that far in and there's a healthy local farming industry so in the spring/summer/fall that means farmers markets and farm stands. Bonus is that if you like beer New England has a high proportion of microbrews and they are tasty!

    There are things to do. I live in Maine and work in Portland. Yeah we're used to driving a lot but we have a thriving local music scene, top notch galleries, local theatre companies, and some really great restaurants. There may not be quite the number of events and options like in larger cities but they are there. Boston also isn't too far a drive away for the bigger stuff.

    I'm personally biased because I LOVE New England. I can't imagine living anywhere else.
  • Who Me?Who Me? Posts: 3,181Registered Users
    I live in Boston, and I could never live in NH/VT/ME, mostly for the reasons GuardianB mentioned below that I agree with. Some people like those aspects, though. But it is NOT a place to be if you like the city life, excitement, being really in touch with what's new and "in", etc. Also, There is not much diversity. Statistically I think Vermont is considered 94% white, for example.
    GuardianB wrote: »
    There are NO cities in NH/VT/ME. Boston is nearest and really it. In comparision to other areas of the country Manchester is NOT a city. Now for us it's big but all is relative. Same with Burlington.

    Not much entertainment really unless you like small stuff or outside stuff. You are not going to find dance clubs and athletic gyms or complexs at every corner. You will need to travel. Having a vehicle is imperative. Public transportaion is virtually non existant and walking except to only the most local places IF you are in one of those "cities" hubs isn't something to rely on.

    Yes, get your cold weather parka and snow boots but the summers can be quiet warm with some tough humidity.

    People are generally friendly though. They'll stop to help someone change a tire. Crime is much lower. Schools are excellent. Traffic is not bad except maybe for 30 minutes around rush in and out of work. Dunkin Donuts coffee is the brew. You'll never be more than 15minutes from a quiet patch of trees if you wanted to get away. There are 4 seasons. There is ocean or lakes, mountains, fields, cows, and fresh apples, maple syrup and lobster.


    I'm pretty sure Manchester/Burlington/Portland/Portsmouth and such all qualify as cities. Are they big cities? No. But they are cities.

    Yeah, lots of things qualify as cities technically. I think what is meant when saying that there are no cities in NH/VT/ME is that there is no city living; there is no way to have a city lifestyle. These places are officially "cities", but to me they have the feel of a quaint town, they're just officially big and populated enough to get the city nametag.

    There are things to do. ....we're used to driving a lot but we have a thriving local music scene, top notch galleries, local theatre companies, and some really great restaurants. There may not be quite the number of events and options like in larger cities but they are there. Boston also isn't too far a drive away for the bigger stuff.

    Aside from the driving a lot (and I mean a LOT), as a city girl I wholeheartedly disagree with these statements. And for most people I know who live in NH/VT/ME, they often talk about how Boston is so close and they can come here and get all the culture they want...but they probably visit Boston about 1-2 times per year.
    "I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!" -BART SIMPSON
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    Who Me? wrote: »
    I live in Boston, and I could never live in NH/VT/ME, mostly for the reasons GuardianB mentioned below that I agree with. Some people like those aspects, though. But it is NOT a place to be if you like the city life, excitement, being really in touch with what's new and "in", etc. Also, There is not much diversity. Statistically I think Vermont is considered 94% white, for example.
    GuardianB wrote: »
    There are NO cities in NH/VT/ME. Boston is nearest and really it. In comparision to other areas of the country Manchester is NOT a city. Now for us it's big but all is relative. Same with Burlington.

    Not much entertainment really unless you like small stuff or outside stuff. You are not going to find dance clubs and athletic gyms or complexs at every corner. You will need to travel. Having a vehicle is imperative. Public transportaion is virtually non existant and walking except to only the most local places IF you are in one of those "cities" hubs isn't something to rely on.

    Yes, get your cold weather parka and snow boots but the summers can be quiet warm with some tough humidity.

    People are generally friendly though. They'll stop to help someone change a tire. Crime is much lower. Schools are excellent. Traffic is not bad except maybe for 30 minutes around rush in and out of work. Dunkin Donuts coffee is the brew. You'll never be more than 15minutes from a quiet patch of trees if you wanted to get away. There are 4 seasons. There is ocean or lakes, mountains, fields, cows, and fresh apples, maple syrup and lobster.


    I'm pretty sure Manchester/Burlington/Portland/Portsmouth and such all qualify as cities. Are they big cities? No. But they are cities.

    Yeah, lots of things qualify as cities technically. I think what is meant when saying that there are no cities in NH/VT/ME is that there is no city living; there is no way to have a city lifestyle. These places are officially "cities", but to me they have the feel of a quaint town, they're just officially big and populated enough to get the city nametag.

    There are things to do. ....we're used to driving a lot but we have a thriving local music scene, top notch galleries, local theatre companies, and some really great restaurants. There may not be quite the number of events and options like in larger cities but they are there. Boston also isn't too far a drive away for the bigger stuff.

    Aside from the driving a lot (and I mean a LOT), as a city girl I wholeheartedly disagree with these statements. And for most people I know who live in NH/VT/ME, they often talk about how Boston is so close and they can come here and get all the culture they want...but they probably visit Boston about 1-2 times per year.

    Well mainly they don't go because they don't want to deal with the congestion, parking, navigating the city, and dealing with all the people. I've lived in Boston and I loved it. But I love having a lawn, garden, and my own driveway more. I like having a car so I can go wherever whenever I want. I prefer it when the culture comes to us. It's cheaper.
  • xcptnlxcptnl Posts: 15,678Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I think it all depends upon what you are looking for and as long as you know the facts about NH/VT then you wont go into it blind. I love both states but I also went to school in Boston and love the city. We live about an hour away from Boston and go in 2-3 times a month if not more. But to be completely honest - western MA is pretty desolate so it's not just NH/VT (see my note above about my drive time to get to a Target store). I would consider Manchester or Nashua NH huge in comparison to some towns/city in Western Mass. Burlington VT has a lot going on due to the the university and it's diverse but yes, it's all on it's own up there in Northern VT but I would live there in heartbeat!

    Again, to the OP I will also try to give you any info you are looking for - either in this thread or feel free to PM me.
    Central Massachusetts

    One good reason to only maintain a small circle of friends is that three out of four murders are committed by people who know the victim. ~George Carlin~

    In regards to Vagazzling: They just want to get into the goods without worrying about getting scratched up by fake crystals. ~spring1onu~
  • rileybrileyb Posts: 1,975Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I've lived in Boston for most of my life (aside from a few years in CA) but I did live in NH for a few years. Both have their pros and cons, but it really depends on what kind of living you're looking for. They are not 'big cities' but Portsmouth, Portland and Burlington have nice restaurants, shops and plenty of things to do. As someone else mentioned, neither VT nor NH are particularly diverse states, but there are a lot of things I love about them.
    I haven't got the slightest idea how to change people, but I still keep a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.
  • GuardianBGuardianB Posts: 1,905Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    I'm personally biased because I LOVE New England. I can't imagine living anywhere else.

    I love it too and I may have come across as negative. People here don't leave. Sure some get out of school or find job offers they can't refuse and do move but for the most part once you've really become part of the area and settled into a comfort you find what you like and stay.
    It is all about local and you can find diversity if you look it just may not be as readily advertised like in the big metropolitians.

    And we do have qualifying cities:joker: but my wife grew up in a "small town" in Tennessee and it is easily larger than where we live now. Which is the 4th most populated "city" in NH.

    NH - Manchester, Nashua, Concord, Keene, Rochester, Dover, Portsmouth

    VT - Burlington, Barre, Rutland

    ME - Portland, Augusta (maybe), Bangor, Lewiston

    As New Englanders we'd probably agree these register as cities for us but looking at the population counts they hardly compare. And technically for example, in Manchester, the largest of these Tri-States cities doesn't actually have a Target store IN the city. 1 each in 2 suburb cites surrounding but just making a point because those 2 suburbs are definately distinct towns in their own right.

    http://www.simplyhired.com/a/local-jobs/city/l-Manchester,+NH

    Fargo ND - 90.6k
    Sioux Falls SD - 139.5k
    Deluth MN - 85.9k
    Mobile AL - 191.5k
    Yuma AZ - 84.6k
    Salem OR - 148.7k
    Columbia SC - 117k
    Chattanooga TN - 154.7k
    Ogden Utah - 78.3k

    New England
    Manchester 109k
    Nashua - 87k
    Portland - 64k
    Burlington - 38.5k

    Some large disparity there. Those aren't necessarily largest cities in the other states/regions but should certainly be somewhat recognizable.
    ~Two friends, one soul inspired~ anonymous
  • GuardianBGuardianB Posts: 1,905Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    curlyarca,

    Where abouts are you coming from? (sorry I can't remember as I'm not around as much)
    What field of work are you in?

    It certainly makes a difference on what you can do and where you can go. I'd have no problems giving opinions on "good" areas to check out in NH when it comes to housing. It all comes down to what you are comfortable with though.
    Available with pms. Best of luck in your choices.
    ~Two friends, one soul inspired~ anonymous
  • Who Me?Who Me? Posts: 3,181Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    Well mainly they don't go because they don't want to deal with the congestion, parking, navigating the city, and dealing with all the people. I've lived in Boston and I loved it. But I love having a lawn, garden, and my own driveway more. I like having a car so I can go wherever whenever I want. I prefer it when the culture comes to us. It's cheaper.

    Of course there are bad things about cities, too!

    I guess my main point is that someone shouldn't move to NH/VT/ME thinking that there are cities there, because of what is called a city in those areas. If you love living in a semi-urban environment in another part of the country and you're thingking "Well, I can move to VT. I'll just live in Burlington so it will be plenty urban", then you're probably not going to enjoy it!
    "I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!" -BART SIMPSON
  • GuardianBGuardianB Posts: 1,905Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Who Me? wrote: »
    If you love living in a semi-urban environment in another part of the country and you're thingking "Well, I can move to VT. I'll just live in Burlington so it will be plenty urban", then you're probably not going to enjoy it!

    Exactly my point. And I'll reiterate again the need for a reliable vehicle because public transportation is not. You will not be satisfied with your options if you only have a bike, taxi or your feet to take you places. Not enough places and not enough cabs. :glasses1:
    ~Two friends, one soul inspired~ anonymous
  • MizKerriMizKerri Posts: 1,701Registered Users
    I have spent most of my life in New Hampshire. I live in Nashua, close to the MA border. New Hampshire does not have huge cities, but there are small cities. Sure, they can't compare to Boston, NYC, Chicago, etc. Manchester is NH's biggest city and I believe it has a little over 100,000 people, for example.

    In NH, you'll need a car. We have lousy public transportation. I think the seacoast has a good bus system, though. It did while I was attending college there. Portsmouth, on the seacoast, is my favorite place in New Hampshire. It has a great little downtown full of shops and restaurants.

    For me, I don't like rural areas, and NH gets a little too remote for me once you're north or west of Manchester.

    If you want to PM me about specific locations, feel free. I am admittedly biased since I grew up here, but I also like and would live in Massachusetts (I only say that because some, not all, NH people hate MA and vice versa).
    Location: Southern NH

    If a news story breaks and no one on the Internet comments, did it really happen?
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    GuardianB wrote: »
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    I'm personally biased because I LOVE New England. I can't imagine living anywhere else.

    I love it too and I may have come across as negative. People here don't leave. Sure some get out of school or find job offers they can't refuse and do move but for the most part once you've really become part of the area and settled into a comfort you find what you like and stay.
    It is all about local and you can find diversity if you look it just may not be as readily advertised like in the big metropolitians.

    And we do have qualifying cities:joker: but my wife grew up in a "small town" in Tennessee and it is easily larger than where we live now. Which is the 4th most populated "city" in NH.

    NH - Manchester, Nashua, Concord, Keene, Rochester, Dover, Portsmouth

    VT - Burlington, Barre, Rutland

    ME - Portland, Augusta (maybe), Bangor, Lewiston

    As New Englanders we'd probably agree these register as cities for us but looking at the population counts they hardly compare. And technically for example, in Manchester, the largest of these Tri-States cities doesn't actually have a Target store IN the city. 1 each in 2 suburb cites surrounding but just making a point because those 2 suburbs are definately distinct towns in their own right.

    http://www.simplyhired.com/a/local-jobs/city/l-Manchester,+NH

    Fargo ND - 90.6k
    Sioux Falls SD - 139.5k
    Deluth MN - 85.9k
    Mobile AL - 191.5k
    Yuma AZ - 84.6k
    Salem OR - 148.7k
    Columbia SC - 117k
    Chattanooga TN - 154.7k
    Ogden Utah - 78.3k

    New England
    Manchester 109k
    Nashua - 87k
    Portland - 64k
    Burlington - 38.5k

    Some large disparity there. Those aren't necessarily largest cities in the other states/regions but should certainly be somewhat recognizable.

    No actually you didn't come across as hating NE. I realized reading back over my post I got a little over defensive on the whole city thing. In my defense I needed food and this rain is really putting my brain to sleep. I didn't mean to come off so down on the city. I love Boston and it's one of the big reasons I love NE. I guess we have big city, city, town, small town, and podunk little townlet.

    The biggest reason I love NE besides the foliage and the seasons (and the apples!) is that in a relatively easy drive you can be in the mountains or at the ocean, rafting down a river, canoeing on a lake, or chilling in the city. It's all here within easy access!
  • curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Thanks for the replies!

    My internet connection is crap, so I'll be pming most of you at some point this week. :)

    "In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

    4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
  • love yourself firstlove yourself first Posts: 5,398Registered Users
    Curlyarca,

    I see that the regional curlies have stepped in. Just writing to say that Vermont is gorgeous with mellow people and a small town feel, even in Burlington which is considered by some to be a city. Don't know New Hampshire at all.

    Best of luck with your interviews and possible relo!
    "Great minds discuss ideas; Average minds discuss events; Small minds discuss people."
    "I think that somehow, we learn who we really are and then we live with that decision."
    - Eleanor Roosevelt (both quotes)

    (taking a break from posting starting late august 2009)
  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    i haven't lived in new hampshire in many, many years. but i went to college there, right on the border of vermont. it was incredibly beautiful--and incredibly remote. i spent many a weekend making the drive to boston.

    there is virtually no diversity there, save for what you find on college campuses. as the others said, it really depends on what you're looking for. i feel really fortunate to have gone to school there, but i wouldn't live there as a grown-up. there are aspects of it that i miss. it's exquisitely beautiful in the fall. and i love the snow there.
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • MizKerriMizKerri Posts: 1,701Registered Users
    I tend to agree with you, journotraveler, on the diversity issue, but it is improving. You'll definitely see nearly all white people in the more rural areas of NH, especially as you move north. The greater Manchester/Nashua area and the seacoast are definitely becoming more diverse today....finally. With that said, compared to most other cities, it is still overwhelmingly white around here.
    Location: Southern NH

    If a news story breaks and no one on the Internet comments, did it really happen?
  • WurlyLoxWurlyLox Posts: 4,858Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I'm in the Atlanta area and have made a lot of trips to NE, although not in the 15 years since I bought my house - can't afford to travel much any more!

    Anyway, to me, Burlington, Portland, Concord and some of the others mentioned have about as much to do as Atlanta-proper without all the suburban sprawl around them - a plus, IMHO.

    Like so many have said, there're advantages and disadvantages to both larger cities and to smaller towns. At least Boston's not that far from anywhere you're probably considering, and it's a unique big city. Personally, I'd like living close enough to visit but not having to bother with some of the urban headaches on a day-to-day basis.

    If I all my family wasn't in the southeast and if I knew a single living soul up there, I could easily see myself living in Burlington, Barre, Rutland, Montpelier, to name a few in VT. Concord, Durham, Portsmouth in NH, maybe even around N Conway, although it's very touristy. Portland or Bangor in ME wouldn't be bad, although I remember thinking Augusta sure was tiny for a state capital. I can't remember much about Lewiston.
    2C/3A/3B - modified CG - fairly fine now, normal/low porosity/normal elasticity

    Current Main Rotation: MG217 medicated or Aim2Health 'poos for scalp, Elucence cond., Spiral Solutions Protein & Deeply Decadent Cond., CJCCCC reg or lite,CJ Pattern Pusha,, Giovanni LA Hold Hair Spritz + lots more, sporadically

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  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    MizKerri wrote: »
    I tend to agree with you, journotraveler, on the diversity issue, but it is improving. You'll definitely see nearly all white people in the more rural areas of NH, especially as you move north. The greater Manchester/Nashua area and the seacoast are definitely becoming more diverse today....finally. With that said, compared to most other cities, it is still overwhelmingly white around here.

    that's cool to hear. someone today was telling me that there are number of black politicians there now... that is a marked difference from when i was going to school there in the '80s. but a part of me will always be nostalgic for new hampshire....
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • mailgirlmailgirl Posts: 451Registered Users
    Burlington is a great place to live! In spite of it being a small city, it does have a lot to offer.
    Terrific dance and theater touring companies come here.
    We have colleges and a college town feel.
    There are a lot of unique shops and also familiar chain stores. There's a nice choice of restaurants.
    There isn't really a nightclub scene like big cities but there are a lot of bars to choose from. Yes, some of them have live music and dancing!
    There are awesome farmers' in and around Burlington!
    Burlington is becoming more diverse all the time! We have a very large refugee population.
    Burlington has been in "great places to live" for one reason or another lists in a variety of magazines!
    Burlington is around an hour from Montreal, Canada if you want to visit a more cosmopolitan city once and awhile!
    There are people that can cut curly hair... haha.
    PM me!!!!!!
    3a/3b/3c/36D


    May the hair gods shine on me (and you!).

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