Poll: Which curly book has been the most helpful for you

musica_almusica_al Posts: 94Registered Users
We see many product reviews but I'd like to see some discussion about the books available. Which curly book has been the most helpful for you and why? Also, which books did not help you? I've posted some choices found here and on Amazon.

Personally I read Curly Girl and found it most helpful. It has good advice. I tried curl talk but found it to be contradictory and also a walking advertisement for her products which turned me off.
Chin length 3A Prodcuts: Burt's Bees More Moisture Shampoo/Conditioner; All in One Spray ; searching for ideal styling products
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Comments

  • knhardeknharde Posts: 100Registered Users
    I voted for Ouidad's curl talk. Although I love Massey's book too, I found Ouidad's to be a little more helpful. They both teach you how to take care of your hair (conditioning, styling, etc.) and identify your general hair type, but Ouidad's book taught me more about ingredients and seemed more practical (for ex., she has a section on straightening the hair, which I think is wise to include because you can't assume that every curly wants to be curly everyday. Massey would never entertain such a thought.). It is true that Ouidad plugged her products in there, but I'm certain every author who has their own line will recommend their products (Massey didnt have a line at the time her book was written, but just as soon as DevaCurl came to fruition she has shamelessly plugged it as the be-all-end-all). The only edge Massey's book has over Ouidad's is that it has glossy color photos (maybe its just my edition or something, but my Ouidad book is paperback w/ black & white pics that suck :(). Massey's book also has cute little stories about real women (who used to fight their curls but now embrace them), homemade recipes of producs, and a curly history time-line. Ouidad's book was just more real-world friendly though--I remember it "debunking" a lot more myths about curly hair, & there was a section about how to find a good stylist.
    4a/b, a little 3c at the crown; current faves: Anita Grant, Qhemet, Oyin...natural since 2000...(currently 15 inches)
  • kimmyckimmyc Posts: 551Registered Users
    I liked Curly Girl. I like the real stories, the pics and the fact that she teaches you to keep your hair healthy. I do keep my hair curly every day so it works for me. :D
    2b/3a, primarily use Jessicurl and DevaCurl products, Curls Hair Tea conditioner and various gels. I'm modified CG-ish since 5/04.
  • jeepcurlygurljeepcurlygurl Posts: 20,729Registered Users, Curl Ambassador Curl Virtuoso
    I too loved the "real people" stories in Curly Girl.

    Another book that has been helpful to me recently is Going Gray, Looking Great.
    --I'm located in Western PA.   --I found NC in late 2004, CG since February 2005, joined the forums in May 2005, started going grey in late 2005.   --My hair is 3B with some 3A, currently at mid back length when dry,  texture-medium/fine, porosity-top is low, middle is medium, ends are porous, elasticity-normal.   --My long time favorite products are Suave & VO5 conditioners, LA Looks Sport Gel, coconut oil, honey, vinegar.   
    --My CG and grey hair progress -  
    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/going-gray/179328-jeepys-grey-hair-progress.html   
    --My article at NaturallyCurly about going grey - 
    https://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/color/how-i-went-completely-gray-and-loved-it
  • klloydmajesticklloydmajestic Posts: 183Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I also found CG to be my favorite. However, I might be a lil bias because that was the first one I read out of these others :wink:
    3b, low porosity, CG method
    BC 6 February 2016 and growing out. . . again!
    current products: 
    • conditioner: Jessicurl Too Shea!
    • pre-poo: grapeseed oil or coconut oil
    • cleanser: currently experimenting with different things
    • deep treatment: Jessicurl Deep Treatment
    • "protein" treatment: SheaMoisture Manuka Honey & Mafura Oil Intensive Hydration Masque
    • Stylers: Fruit of the Earth 100% Aloe Vera gel or SheaMoisture Coconut & Hibiscus Curl Enhancing Smoothie

  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    I found CG to be the least helpful. I liked 'Andre Talks Hair' and 'For Coloured Girls who have considered weaves when the chemicals get too ruff' and Ouidad's book and Diane DaCosta's book all a lot more than CG - I also have a great book about braiding and stuff but can't remember the name. And Strictly Curls is a great styling book. I am still waiting for someone to write a book about 3b/c or 3c mixed/Black type hair - or maybe there is one I don't know of?

    I really don't like the CG book because it really didn't have any new or helpful information and the section on Black hair was quite offensive - she goes on and on about how you shouldn't straighten hair ever even with a blowdryer, and how brushes are so damaging, and how to make it curlier, and then tells Black people to get texturizers and set their hair. (I don't have a problem with that in itself, but it's inconsistent.) And her methods just don't work for me - I can't detangle my hair with my fingers to save my life and the anti cones thing is too strict, expecially when her products have them. Some of my favourite products aren't clear.

    Also, I didn't like how just about all the people interviewed in the book all claimed to have hated their curls till they met her. Lorraine Massey seems to think that all curly heads hate their hair and that isn't true. This contest she's running for children wants them to write an essay on why I hate my curly hair to get a hair makeover. Why can't it be why I love my curly hair, or how I feel about my curly hair, allowing for good and bad feelings? Not all people with a wave to their hair have poor self-esteem. It got tiring. I like my hair a lot and am fairly knowledgeable about how to care for it, and I just read books to get styling or care tips, not for a lecture I don't need.

    Finally, I don't like how Lorraine Massey's hair looks. It's too highlighted (to me, highlights are way worse than occassional heat straightening or light relaxers in terms of what they do to the hair) and it just looks too trendily controlled and crunchy and layered for my taste (others may like it) so if she is the poster child of what your hair looks like with her methods and products, it's not for me. Ouidad has cute looking hair that looks more natural, and also seems to have coarser hair that has a closer texture to mine.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    i voted for Curly Girl also. while i definitely agree with a lot of the things amneris said (inconsistency, too strict routine, assuming everyone hates their curls), i think that loosely following the CG routine has been one of the best things for my hair.
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
    Mama to two wild superheroes and a curly-headed baby boy :love5:
  • musica_almusica_al Posts: 94Registered Users
    I agree that CG does have its faults.
    As for the interviews in CG--I mostly skimmed them and haven't read them since, although I've re-read other parts of the book many times.
    Also I can see how her section on black/ethnic hair would be lacking/inconsistent.
    And as for her not having a hair care line at the time the book was written and therefore no products to advertise--if she ever releases a new version and shamelessley plugs her products I will likely not find it as useful.
    I did find some info in Ouidad's book useful- myths, ingredients, etc, but overall, CG was more beneficial for my hair, hair type, and lifestyle.
    Chin length 3A Prodcuts: Burt's Bees More Moisture Shampoo/Conditioner; All in One Spray ; searching for ideal styling products
  • PortaePortae Posts: 337Registered Users
    I voted for Ouidad's book because I think the styling advice can be used by the widest variety of curl-types. I also love the books by Andre Walker (Andre Talks Hair) and Pamela Ferrel (Let's Talk Hair). However, my all time favorite is Lonnice Brittenum Brice's book (Good Hair : For Colored Girls Who've Considered Weaves When the Chemicals Became Too Ruff ). She is the woman who first came up with the "shake and go." Her book has great practical styling advice.

    I would love to check out T'keyah Crystal Keymah's book (Natural Woman: Natural Hair) and Diana DaCosta's (Textured Tresses).

    I can't stand Lorraine Massey's book. I feel it's derivative and not even remotely useful for African American curlies.
    ~Break the Chains of Your Mind and Your Body will Follow~

    3b/3c/4a
    http://public.fotki.com/Portae99/
    http://photos.yahoo.com/Portae_99
  • curlaciouscurlacious Posts: 69Registered Users
    I chose Curly Girl by Lorraine Massey. Although I have 4a/3c curls, I totally ignored her advice for AA curlies and just used the advice given for corkscrews and it worked amazingly well for me. My hair is healthy and growing and that is what mattered most to me.
    I read the other books too Textured Tresses, Andre Talks Hair, Let's Talk Hair, but not Ouidad. I am not into braids, twists or locks though so those books did not interest me since for the most part their recommendations included those types of styles.
    I think you just have to know what your personal desires are and use the information in books to your advantage. Curly Girl had the most useful info for me. 8)
    curly,coily modified CG, Nexxus Exxtra Gel,Elucence MBC, honey, HE SMU, DevaCurl B'Leave-in, Camellia oil, Burt's bee's shampoo bar, Cure Care conditioner, Shique Herbal conditioner.
  • klloydmajesticklloydmajestic Posts: 183Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    PixieCurl wrote:
    i voted for Curly Girl also. while i definitely agree with a lot of the things amneris said (inconsistency, too strict routine, assuming everyone hates their curls), i think that loosely following the CG routine has been one of the best things for my hair.
    I'm with you there, both of you that is :)
    3b, low porosity, CG method
    BC 6 February 2016 and growing out. . . again!
    current products: 
    • conditioner: Jessicurl Too Shea!
    • pre-poo: grapeseed oil or coconut oil
    • cleanser: currently experimenting with different things
    • deep treatment: Jessicurl Deep Treatment
    • "protein" treatment: SheaMoisture Manuka Honey & Mafura Oil Intensive Hydration Masque
    • Stylers: Fruit of the Earth 100% Aloe Vera gel or SheaMoisture Coconut & Hibiscus Curl Enhancing Smoothie

  • LadydncingLadydncing Posts: 964Registered Users
    If I could, I would vote for 2. CG by LM and CT by Ouidad.
    They are not perfect, I was able to use information from
    both these books.
    Maya
    3b/c CG routine
    HG line DevaCurl
    Password: Locks

    event.png
  • nicoleshairnicoleshair Posts: 49Registered Users
    I voted for Dickey because it was the first book i read that didnt talk about stright hair more then non-stright hair.
    I'm Black/Native American with 4A or 4B hair? This is the second time i stop relaxing my hair! Thanks to this site.
  • souffouesouffoue Posts: 21Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    I found CG to be the least helpful. I liked 'Andre Talks Hair' and 'For Coloured Girls who have considered weaves when the chemicals get too ruff' and Ouidad's book and Diane DaCosta's book all a lot more than CG - I also have a great book about braiding and stuff but can't remember the name. And Strictly Curls is a great styling book. I am still waiting for someone to write a book about 3b/c or 3c mixed/Black type hair - or maybe there is one I don't know of?

    I really don't like the CG book because it really didn't have any new or helpful information and the section on Black hair was quite offensive - she goes on and on about how you shouldn't straighten hair ever even with a blowdryer, and how brushes are so damaging, and how to make it curlier, and then tells Black people to get texturizers and set their hair. (I don't have a problem with that in itself, but it's inconsistent.) And her methods just don't work for me - I can't detangle my hair with my fingers to save my life and the anti cones thing is too strict, expecially when her products have them. Some of my favourite products aren't clear.

    Also, I didn't like how just about all the people interviewed in the book all claimed to have hated their curls till they met her. Lorraine Massey seems to think that all curly heads hate their hair and that isn't true. This contest she's running for children wants them to write an essay on why I hate my curly hair to get a hair makeover. Why can't it be why I love my curly hair, or how I feel about my curly hair, allowing for good and bad feelings? Not all people with a wave to their hair have poor self-esteem. It got tiring. I like my hair a lot and am fairly knowledgeable about how to care for it, and I just read books to get styling or care tips, not for a lecture I don't need.

    Finally, I don't like how Lorraine Massey's hair looks. It's too highlighted (to me, highlights are way worse than occassional heat straightening or light relaxers in terms of what they do to the hair) and it just looks too trendily controlled and crunchy and layered for my taste (others may like it) so if she is the poster child of what your hair looks like with her methods and products, it's not for me. Ouidad has cute looking hair that looks more natural, and also seems to have coarser hair that has a closer texture to mine.

    I also agree with amneris. I would love to find a book for mixed/black hair type 3c. And I don't like the contest for the kids to writie why they "hate" they curly hair! I am trying desperately to teach my daughter to LOVE her curls. She is bi-racial and we live in a town where she is the minority. She is six and started kindergarten - she comes home wanting long straight hair cuz no one else has curly hair like her. I tell her every day how beautiful her hair is and how I would LOVE to have her curls (I really would!!) There are days too though that she LOVES her curls. There are other bi-racial kids in the school (not many though) but they aren't in her class or in her grade. Sorry for going OT
    Susie
    straight-haired mommy to a curly 3c/4a (7 yr old)
  • KurleeKurlee Posts: 1,354Registered Users
    PixieCurl wrote:
    i voted for Curly Girl also. while i definitely agree with a lot of the things amneris said (inconsistency, too strict routine, assuming everyone hates their curls), i think that loosely following the CG routine has been one of the best things for my hair.
    I'm with you there, both of you that is :)

    This goes for me too.
    I don't really follow the CG method any more, but reading the book has made me change how I care for my hair LOTS.

  • DolphinCurlsDolphinCurls Posts: 370Registered Users
    I did like the Curly Girl book a lot, but it definitely has its flaws. It was a humorous read, but I didn't like how they only had one real story about a girl with wavy hair. And the one girl who had wavy hair mentioned that she "wasn't a true curly" or something like that. I found that offensive. Waves are loose curls and a lot of bend. I am mostly wavy with some curl, but I do consider myself a "Curly Girl" and a lot of other wavies on here do the same thing. She barely even gives advice for wavy hair. I felt like a fraud after reading it.
    3A/2C combination of ringlets and waves :nike:
  • CurlyQTeeCurlyQTee Posts: 10Registered Users
    All I know is that since I've stopped washing my hair with shampoo, its never behaved better! :D

    Curly Girl has my vote!
    3B, I think....I do know it's red and curly!
    Password for website: Tisse
  • luvmylocsluvmylocs Posts: 7,578Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    i didn't vote BUT i wanted to give my 2 cents on a few hair books.

    curly girl - i agree the black hair section was pretty bad, between extensions, texturizes and multi-ethnic hair there was hardly anything in it about caring for regular 'ole black hair that may be 4 a/b BUT the no shampoo and awareness of silicones and how to dry curly hair information has been priceless...so it's part of my collection and i recommendtion it to others.

    natural hair/natural woman by t'keyah - great pictures and inspiration on wearing your hair natural. there's nothing negative about the use of the word nappy. a full range of styles and just a good one for the collection. mentions what styles are good based on the length of your hair. professionally done

    textured tresses - pretty good for a collection, discusses the variety of black hair care, no shame in texturizing if that's what the person wants to do. i love that that author has done all sorts of natural styles. she's also a columists here

    Let's Talk Hair: Every Black Woman's Personal Consultation for Healthy Growing Hair by Pamela Ferrell - one of my first natural hair care books. back in 99 this was my primary source of information so i'll be forever greatful. i'm sure there's lots of new information now but it's a good reference book for a newly natural woman

    Nice Dreads & Good Hair both by Lonnice Brittenum Bonner - both have helped me in my natural hair and loc journey. they are small books with good pictures and how to information plus the added bonus of the author walking the walk and telling her story.

    Natural Hair Care and Braiding by Diane Carol Bailey - another one of my first natural hair care books. the author is a leader in the field. i learned lots and appreciate having this in my collection

    it's all good hair - a positive hair care book about styling black kids and teens hair. some of the styles i wouldn't be able to do but it really helps you appreciate keeping your child's hair natural so they don't have to transition later on. shows lots of cute, age appropriate styles and let's parents know that black hair isn't unmanageable.

    Andre Talks Hair - a sort of general hair care book that offers the hair classifications we seem to cling to on this site. i don't like that the implication is that african american hair is limited in it's growth potential but then again he's used to working with straight hair it seems. i already own it and have for years. it's okay but one should read other books to supplement their hair information

    for me as a black woman with nappy hair it's really the combination of all of these books, plus some i'm probably forgetting, that has helped me feel like i understand my hair better than any beautician. now there are still some things i want some else to do....like a hair trim since my hair is newly loose after almost 6 years of locs. i will never again let someone convince me to shampoo....if i go somewhere i will go with my hair cleansed and let them know i don't want it rewashed...knowledge is power!!
    a dreamy pisces :fish:
    please recycle, it matters...
    i change lives...through fitness
    i'm more relaxed being natural
  • HalfWavyHalfCurlyHalfWavyHalfCurly Posts: 907Registered Users
    I have read many books about hair care and all of them have given me something good, but my favorite is CG because despite its already mentioned imperfections (with which I agree) it was the one that really taught me how to properly care for my hair so I could discover its true nature and love it. As for L.M. at first she was my uncontested "hair idol" but when I read the first chat here I began to realize she was a little closed up, but I will always be grateful that she put her innovative method out there for "closeted curlies" like me.

    I read Ouidad's after being on CG and I'm kind of glad because the best thing that happened to my scalp and hair was to stop shampooing and I think she probably freaked out when she heard about L.M.'s method. Even though I only did so twice a week with a pretty diluted one it was still irritating and gave me frizz. Also, I strongly disagreed with some of her recommendations such as excessive emphasis on using proteins IMO and not using oils, this last one she contradicted later when describing ingredients to look for in products. :? I think I was so seriously unimpressed beyond that I can't remember anything else. But it's probably more useful for someone totally new to wearing their curls though, and I give her credit for making a difference for many other curlies.
    2A/3A, medium length, layered, colored dark/medium ash blonde - "CGer" since April '02.

    "Converting the 'curlskeptics' one curly head at a time..." HWHC ;-)
  • medusahairmedusahair Posts: 3,515Registered Users
    I voted other because what helped me the most is still reading after all.....
    This site and our shared routines and likes and trials and fails is what has helped me the most.
    2c/3a?
    Low porosity, medium texture.
    http://public.fotki.com/Medusahair/

    If it smells good put it in your hair, if it tastes good spit it out!
  • pinksugarpinksugar Posts: 2,346Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I voted Ouidad. I still go back to it for tips if I'm having a bad hair day. I gave Curly Girl to my cousin. She is now giving it away.
  • SuburbanbushbabeSuburbanbushbabe Posts: 15,402Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I have to say Curl Talk by Ouidad because it was the first one I read (and I saw her) 4 years ago, and she got me started loving my curls. Second one is Curly Girl and third is Let's Talk Hair.
    My blog - http://suburbanbushbabe.wordpress.com/
    My FOTKI - http://whatsnew.fotki.com/suburbanbushbabe/
    comic-p.jpg

    Playing with my hair is a hobby. Fluffy, fine natural 4a. Goal= Healthy, beautiful hair that retains its length.
    Hear that crash? It's me falling off the CG wagon.
  • SYBSYB Posts: 305Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Curly Girl gets my vote!
    "Curls Tester"
    Products in my current regime: Nioxin Scalp Therapy Shampoo, ORS Replenishing Pak, Curls Whipped Cream, Curls Souffle, Curls Spiral Curls Cream, Curls Milkshake, Curls Quenched, BB(Bonner Brothers) Growth Lotion
  • linda_mlinda_m Posts: 211Registered Users
    I voted Curly Girl, which is kind of funny because I don't follow the CG routine any more. I picked it, though, because it taught me a lot about curly/wavy hair and, most importantly, it gave me the information I needed to go from short and straight to longer and curly. I would have never made this journey without that book's advice and support.
    Couple of inches past shoulder length 3A. Shampoo every 3rd or 4th day w/ baby shampoo; Tigi Fashionista conditioner; back to Condition 3-in-1 mousse . Alternate days water rinse, conditioner and mousse.

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