New SIDS Research

Brown_Eyed_GirlBrown_Eyed_Girl Posts: 1,353Registered Users Curl Neophyte

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  • dalitwildalitwil Posts: 104Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Interesting.

    "They found potentially dangerous bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli in nearly half of all babies who died suddenly...

    "Most of the bacteria were detected in the babies' lungs and spleens."


    Isn't there supposed to be bacteria in the spleen? It's a major organ of the immune system and basically serves as a filter-- however, I do know during the perinatal period the liver serves this function initially.

    I am certainly interested to see further research on this, as I have a soon-to-be sister in law who has had 2 babies die as a result of SIDS-- and now with the birth of my very first nephew, I do get anxiety and concern over her previous pregnancies (both were before she was with my brother). He sleeps with an apnea monitor and a nurse comes to their house routinely to assess him. Thankfully, he has just hit his two month mark, and his chances of failing survival (and SIDS) has drastically reduced.

    I feel like SIDS is a condition I would more or less refer to as a "trashcan" term, encompassing a variety of unidentifiable causes of sudden death, which doctors find more convenient to throw together and label when they have no clue as to why. This is also the case with other medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome.

    I do know that bacteria can trigger a multitude of "syndromes" but also feel like there is much, much more to the story. The bacteria may have triggered the effect, but I believe these babies are born predisposed genetically for failure to thrive with something medicine has been unable to identify. It is truly tragic, and my heart goes out completely to any/all of those who've had to experience the loss attributed to SIDS.
  • CynaminbearCynaminbear Posts: 4,476Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I'm very interested to see where the research goes with this discovery. My husband's brother died the week he turned 2 months old, and the week my husband turned 3. Our oldest son is named for his brother as this has deeply and profoundly affected him his whole life.
    When I was pregnant I looked into SIDS as much as I could to make sure it isn't genetic, and everything I've read has said it isn't. There were at least 10 common factors and I made sure to avoid as many of them as possible.
    I find the presence of bacteria in those major organs interesting. I don't understand how bacteria in the lungs or spleen could be linked to the children who died of SIDS when they were fully awake, and just didn't take another breath.
    There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    A couple of things stood out for me. They mentioned maternal antibodies transferred to the newborn wearing off around 8-10 weeks after birth. Did they take into account breastmilk and the antibodies that are constantly being given (or did they sort through babies who were breastfed vs. formula fed to get more information).

    Also around 2 months old is when the big blitz of vaccines begins. If a child is already low on antibodies, and then given around 4-5 vaccines during his two month visit that would be very taxing on a slowly developing immune system. But that doesn't explain much because they only found the bacteria in around half the babies that died of SIDS in this particular article.

    I'd love to see more information on this. I remember on my first due date board we were all breathing somewhat a sigh of relief when the babies were turning 6 months old because a 4 month old on our board had died and it was labeled as SIDS. Then another little boy passed at 7 months old. So sad.
  • Brown_Eyed_GirlBrown_Eyed_Girl Posts: 1,353Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    A couple of things stood out for me. They mentioned maternal antibodies transferred to the newborn wearing off around 8-10 weeks after birth. Did they take into account breastmilk and the antibodies that are constantly being given (or did they sort through babies who were breastfed vs. formula fed to get more information).

    I wondered about this too.

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