Did birth classes really help you?

SimbathekatSimbathekat Posts: 140Registered Users
Ok, so it's about that time for me to start signing us up for birthing classes that'll run us about $300 (insurance doesn't cover). I am interested in the courses, but that money can go somewhere else. I know several people who've had their babies just fine without birthing know-how sessions.

Do you think birthing classes really help with the process or are they just fun activities you can live without? Maybe I can just sign up for a few essentials like Infant CPR, Breastfeeding and Babies 101.
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  • DarkAngelDarkAngel Posts: 2,671Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I only went to about half of my classes and they weren't helpful for the birth itself (general anesthesia) but they did include some helpful components. I got a tour of the hospital and picked up some great relaxation tips. That wasn't worth $300. My hospital provided a free class. Does yours not offer something free or at least cheaper?
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  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    I think it depends on what kind of birth you plan on having

    natural vs. planned c-section
    drugs vs. no drugs, vs. "I'll hold out for as long as I can"


    hospital vs. home


    I'd take a look at the curriculum first to see if it works for (or agaisnt) what your optimal birthing situation is.

    I didn't take birthing classes. My midwife did do a quick "emergency situation" talk, how to make sure that things are ready for her and what the process is afterwards type of talk. She left the birthing stuff up to my own research (although she did offer formal classes). But I'm more of a do-it-yourself-er, and didn't care about commiserating with other couples, or mothers to be.
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  • mayimmayim Posts: 2,301Registered Users
    my class was definitely worth the money, but it wasn't the standard, typical hospital issue class. it was a private class (not affiliated with the hospital) and was geared toward those who wanted a natural birth.

    she really worked on partnership, relaxation and labor support techniques, communication, nutrition, and how to avoid interventions and approach birth from a positive, flexible mindset.

    even though i could have gotten the info somewhere else, the experience was invaluable for us as a couple.

    i'd check around and see how many options are available. in my experience, all birth preparation classes are not built the same, so to speak.

    m

    eta: many of the moms from our class are now a part of my mamatoto group, and i'm glad i got to know them and have the chance to form some friendships with some of them now. same goes for s.o.
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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    I agree that it depends on the kind of birth you want and the kind of class it is. We took a private class taught by doulas that focussed on natural birth, and I did accomplish a natural birth, and I think the class helped. However, I found that the class did over-sell the pain factor, for me at least, so I was expecting it to be way worse (which was maybe a good thing) and I didn't need to use most of the pain coping techniques, but they made it seem like getting to the pushing stage would be a big relief and much easier than labour, and pushing was by far the hardest and most tiring thing for me. Bottom line... everyone's experience is unique, so a class can only prepare you so much, but it can give you some useful info.

    It helped my husband A LOT though, and was worth it just for that. Before the class, he, and most people in my life, were very resistant to the idea of natural childbirth. The class changed his perspective and gave him a lot of information about stuff he knew nothing about, and by the time I went into labour, he was not only my biggest supporter of going drug-free but also first that he didn't want to be in the room at all (before we got married!) and then after marriage that he was going to stay by my head and not look, he ended up seeing our son come out, taking video and pictures of it, and saying it was the most amazing thing he had ever seen and he wouldn't have missed it for the world.

    They have free childbirth classes in Canada, but they focus on the hospital perspective with info about epidurals and other drugs, and they teach Lamaze, breathing-type pain relief, and I had no interest in that so I didn't take them.

    The other good thing about our class is the same as what mayim said - we got to make friendships and connections with other new parents-to-be - and the class gave some info about babywearing, breast feeding etc. that was good to refer to later.
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  • mayimmayim Posts: 2,301Registered Users
    Amneris wrote: »

    It helped my husband A LOT though, and was worth it just for that. Before the class, he, and most people in my life, were very resistant to the idea of natural childbirth. The class changed his perspective and gave him a lot of information about stuff he knew nothing about, and by the time I went into labour, he was not only my biggest supporter of going drug-free but also first that he didn't want to be in the room at all (before we got married!) and then after marriage that he was going to stay by my head and not look, he ended up seeing our son come out, taking video and pictures of it, and saying it was the most amazing thing he had ever seen and he wouldn't have missed it for the world.

    we had the exact same experience! except i can also add that he was apprehensive about the home birth before hand and was super supportive of it after!

    the thing i loved about our teacher was that she spent a lot of time emphasizing that everyone's labor will be different, and you have to be ready to go with the flow and keep an open mind.


    m
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  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    I agree. If you want a natural, unmedicated birht with minimum interventions you need some kind of prep (as does your partner). You can read and get prepared without a class, but a class may be easier. And could be more helpful for your partner. If you do want that kind of birth, the classes 99% of hospitals offer are going to be useless for that. They will give some general info on the process of labor and tell you how they like ot do things at that particular hospital.

    If you are pretty sure you want an epidural, I don't think a class is necessary. You should still do some reading to learn about all the different kinds of interverntions they do, their advantages and disadvantages. The Sears Birth Book is a good one, the Birth Partner by Penny Simkin is great. The Thinking Woman's Guide to a Better Birth by Henci Goer is also recommended reading.

    I definitely wanted a med-free intervention-free birth, so the classes I took were helpful for me, and especially for my husband, like mayim and Amneris said. He started out hating the idea of me using a midwife and became a huge natural birth advocate.
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  • KaiaKaia Posts: 8,815Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I think it depends how much you know already. I took the hospital birth, breastfeeding, and infant care classes, and I thought they were a waste of time. Fortunately, we only paid $90 for all three. I spent most of my time there utterly amazed how little the other women in there knew. The information they gave was very very basic. I had more information already from the books I'd read. Next time, I may look into a Bradley or hupnobirthing class.
    *Poster formerly known as Bailey422*

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  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    If you want the typical interventive hospital birth with epidural and IV's...taking a class isn't necessary. If you want a natural birth, then it's probably a good idea to have some classes. Don't take the hospital course though, because all they teach you is how to be a good/quiet patient and how quickly you'll get your epidural. Seek out an independent childbirth instructor who isn't beholden to the hospital.
  • cymprenicympreni Posts: 9,609Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I took the free ones at the hospital, and we considered them to be a complete waste of time. The only reason why we bothered to finish the course was it was mandatory at that hospital for the father to attend if he wanted to be in the delivery room.

    I'll tell you all about it for your enjoyment. Now keep in mind that the class schedule was based up due dates, and just to attend you had to be within 6 weeks of delivery.

    Class 1: Sex ed, conception and 1st trimester 101
    Class 2: 2nd & 3 trimester
    Class 3: basic baby care 101
    Class 4: labor

    They taught some lamaze breathing, but it wasn't anything that I hadn't learned from watching any movie.

    The class started off a good size, but by the end, there was only 3 couples.
  • Brown_Eyed_GirlBrown_Eyed_Girl Posts: 1,353Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    DH and I took Bradley classes, and although I haven't been through labor yet, I think they were every helpful. I knew some of the information from reading, but DH isn't going to sit down and read a book about childbirth, so the info was good for him. I learned a lot also though, and found helpful the nutrition and exercise info in addition to pain management techniques.

    Bradley classes are definitely geared toward natural childbirth, so like the others said, it just depends on what you want.
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    I've never taken a class but did a lot of self-study. For my first labor I read the Bradley book but looking back I would have benefitted more from some other techniques and a doula. For labor #2 I got the doula and by then had really delved into my first birth enough to know what I needed to learn.

    My husband is also not a reader but he did attend all my MW appointments with #1 which helped and if I wanted to make something clear to him I would just discuss it with him. What we've realized at this point is that he prefers for me to be surrounded by experienced women/attendants while he hangs around for moral support. In my first labor he didn't take well to my direction and I realized I needed a more intuitive attendant which I've found in midwives and doulas.

    I also agree to be wary of hospital childbirth classes if you're going for less intervention. Around here one of the largest OB practices has actually been instrumental in silencing/censoring some childbirth educators to the point that one person teaches some classes out of her home to circumvent that for NCB seeking couples. It has reached the point that the childbirth educator is not allowed to review the risks of epidural within the course of study.

    Cympreni that is a crazy course outline - #1 is why you're there in the first place! LOL
  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    mayim wrote: »
    Amneris wrote: »

    It helped my husband A LOT though, and was worth it just for that. Before the class, he, and most people in my life, were very resistant to the idea of natural childbirth. The class changed his perspective and gave him a lot of information about stuff he knew nothing about, and by the time I went into labour, he was not only my biggest supporter of going drug-free but also first that he didn't want to be in the room at all (before we got married!) and then after marriage that he was going to stay by my head and not look, he ended up seeing our son come out, taking video and pictures of it, and saying it was the most amazing thing he had ever seen and he wouldn't have missed it for the world.

    we had the exact same experience! except i can also add that he was apprehensive about the home birth before hand and was super supportive of it after!

    the thing i loved about our teacher was that she spent a lot of time emphasizing that everyone's labor will be different, and you have to be ready to go with the flow and keep an open mind.


    m


    You both bring out another important point. What role your partner wants, and what role would you like him to have. If you are having trouble convincing him to be in the room to support, or to help you fight in the hospital (assuming you're having a hospital birth) for the type of birth you want, then I see a class being very valuable.

    In my case, DH brought up the notion of home birth and midwife. He's helped birth his little sister at home when he was really young, and is a huge natural birthing advocate. There wasn't much we weren't seeing eye-to-eye on from the beginning.
    hello.world.
  • sundaysunday Posts: 535Registered Users
    I dropped out of my class. I knew I wanted an epidural and the majority of the extremely long classes consisted of watching birthing videos filmed in the 70's and other pregnant women asking the teacher about their strange pregnancy symptoms and various other questions (i.e. I have headaches sometimes - does this mean I'm going to go into labor soon?). I did take the infant care class which was helpful b/c I had never held a baby before my son, never changed a diaper....
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  • Brown_Eyed_GirlBrown_Eyed_Girl Posts: 1,353Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Just wanted to add...

    We also took an Infant CPR class at the hospital. Although it mostly consisted of videos, we also practiced on baby dolls, which was really helpful b/c otherwise I wouldn't really have understood how to do it. Hopefully, I'll never have to use that info, but I'm glad to know it just in case.

    I also took a breastfeeding class at the hospital. I'm sure the quality varies from place to place, but I found it very informative. A lot of the info I knew from reading, but it was a good review, we practiced positions with a doll, and I learned a few bits of info I didn't know before too.
  • Scuba GalScuba Gal Posts: 383Registered Users
    I took the classes offered by the hospital (child birth, breastfeeding and CPR) and for the most part- they were somewhat beneficial. But honestly- they were more important (at least the child birth and bf class) for my husband because he needed to really 'get' what was going to happen. He was not around babies and/or had any exposure at all thru family who had kids, etc.

    So for his sake- I think the class (they were 3-6 hours total each) was good for him to get a little reality check on what to expect.

    For me- it was all kind of thrown out the window (child birth wise) when I had to have a c-section because of a breech baby/bicornuate uterus- so the c-section part ended up being beneficial as I was not planning on this- and really did all of my research on a vaginal delivery... I didn't find out about her being breech until 40w5d so I had little time to really prepare for that type of delivery- the info I learned at class made me a little more comfortable there.
  • internetchickinternetchick Posts: 6,191Registered Users
    I took Bradley Method classes(I had all three of my kids unmedicated and wanted a class geared towards that goal) and they were well worth it. I took a required hospital class, and like Bailey I was shocked by how little the women knew. My husband got a lot from the classes, since he wasn't so much into reading about childbirth.
  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    If you want the typical interventive hospital birth with epidural and IV's...taking a class isn't necessary. If you want a natural birth, then it's probably a good idea to have some classes. Don't take the hospital course though, because all they teach you is how to be a good/quiet patient and how quickly you'll get your epidural. Seek out an independent childbirth instructor who isn't beholden to the hospital.

    i have to disagree with this. i knew id have a "typical interventive hospital birth" but i think the classes were helpful not only to me, but to my SO. i did take the hospital course and they didnt teach us how to be a good/quiet patient nor how quickly we'd get an epidural. where i live all the birth's take place at a women's hospital which is super informative about all your options with a hospital birth and they dont try to push anything on you. i cant say enough good things about our childbirthing class and hospital.and even if you decide youre not going to take any classes, it would still be wise for your husband/boyfriend/whomever is going to attend the birth with you to take them.
  • Scuba GalScuba Gal Posts: 383Registered Users
    If you want the typical interventive hospital birth with epidural and IV's...taking a class isn't necessary. If you want a natural birth, then it's probably a good idea to have some classes. Don't take the hospital course though, because all they teach you is how to be a good/quiet patient and how quickly you'll get your epidural. Seek out an independent childbirth instructor who isn't beholden to the hospital.

    Insulting to say the least. Just because someone chooses to go with pain control options it doesn't mean they are some passive bystander in their own childs birth as you seem to (continuously) imply with your comments....
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Scuba Gal wrote: »
    If you want the typical interventive hospital birth with epidural and IV's...taking a class isn't necessary. If you want a natural birth, then it's probably a good idea to have some classes. Don't take the hospital course though, because all they teach you is how to be a good/quiet patient and how quickly you'll get your epidural. Seek out an independent childbirth instructor who isn't beholden to the hospital.

    Insulting to say the least. Just because someone chooses to go with pain control options it doesn't mean they are some passive bystander in their own childs birth as you seem to (continuously) imply with your comments....



    I'm just stating fact. Most hospital births are interventive...meaning the natural birth process is intervened with. If you choose to go with pain medication, you really have very few choices...you HAVE to have everything that goes along with it, e.g. IV, continuous EFM, enforced bedrest, urinary catheters, pitocin, etc. You can't say no to those things if you say yes to an epidural, even if you want to think you can.
  • SimbathekatSimbathekat Posts: 140Registered Users
    DarkAngel wrote: »
    I only went to about half of my classes and they weren't helpful for the birth itself (general anesthesia) but they did include some helpful components. I got a tour of the hospital and picked up some great relaxation tips. That wasn't worth $300. My hospital provided a free class. Does yours not offer something free or at least cheaper?

    I'm in the Chicago area at the Northwestern Womens' Prentice Center (for those who are familiar) and the $300 covers a package of five courses. They don't offer any free classes. I've done more research in the Chicago area, and there aren't many options for birthing courses. Maybe I'll dig a bit deeper over the next two weeks. At the very least, I'll sign up for a couple of courses to benefit my S.O.
  • inheritedcurlsinheritedcurls Posts: 2,954Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    We took three classes. I learned something from each. I will say my most informative class was the breastfeeding class. I was so glad I took that. It was very helpful to know what to do prior to the little guy being born. I had a very easy time breastfeeding...I say one part was Chas being a natural sucker and the second part was I was relaxed and informed on what to do (even on drugs). I recommend to anybody to take a breastfeeding class.

    We also took lamaze classes (very pro natural birth). I learned all about the different stages of birth, breathing etc. Of course, I ended up with a planned c-section like Shelli due to a breech baby. I will say we did get a tour of the hospital with this one which helped tremendously.

    3rd class was a baby care class. I got absolutely nothing out of it except for the infant CPR and book I referred back to about baby poop and whether to add +1 to under the arm temperatures. My hospital didn't offer just a CPR class by itself.

    I will also say while I'm not sure of the exact amount I know we didn't spend more than 150.00 for all three classes.
  • Scuba GalScuba Gal Posts: 383Registered Users
    DarkAngel wrote: »
    I only went to about half of my classes and they weren't helpful for the birth itself (general anesthesia) but they did include some helpful components. I got a tour of the hospital and picked up some great relaxation tips. That wasn't worth $300. My hospital provided a free class. Does yours not offer something free or at least cheaper?

    I'm in the Chicago area at the Northwestern Womens' Prentice Center (for those who are familiar) and the $300 covers a package of five courses. They don't offer any free classes. I've done more research in the Chicago area, and there aren't many options for birthing courses. Maybe I'll dig a bit deeper over the next two weeks. At the very least, I'll sign up for a couple of courses to benefit my S.O.

    I did/am delivering at Prentice and I didn't pay 300.00. But I only took 3 classes so maybe you can pay for the ones you want. I took the infant CPR and Breastfeeding class- then the Great Expectation class that is offered at Prentice and includes the tour. I had Maggie at the 'old' Prentice so I am not doing the tour of the new one (where I will have this baby) but that class alone was the best for Kevin because it gave him some realistic insight into what labor is like (medicated or not) as he had zero exposure.

    I do *think* that my OB offered classes too- so the CPR and maybe breastfeeding were done thru them and maybe that is why it is cheaper. I can give you the info if you are interested...
  • SimbathekatSimbathekat Posts: 140Registered Users
    Scuba Gal wrote: »
    If you want the typical interventive hospital birth with epidural and IV's...taking a class isn't necessary. If you want a natural birth, then it's probably a good idea to have some classes. Don't take the hospital course though, because all they teach you is how to be a good/quiet patient and how quickly you'll get your epidural. Seek out an independent childbirth instructor who isn't beholden to the hospital.

    Insulting to say the least. Just because someone chooses to go with pain control options it doesn't mean they are some passive bystander in their own childs birth as you seem to (continuously) imply with your comments....



    I'm just stating fact. Most hospital births are interventive...meaning the natural birth process is intervened with. If you choose to go with pain medication, you really have very few choices...you HAVE to have everything that goes along with it, e.g. IV, continuous EFM, enforced bedrest, urinary catheters, pitocin, etc. You can't say no to those things if you say yes to an epidural, even if you want to think you can.

    I can see how this holds true somewhat. Wouldn't go so far to say that classes are unnecessary if one chose to get an epidural, but once the drug is introduced into your body you can no longer feel what's going on. How can you use techniques you've learned in birthing classes, when you can't feel your birth?

    Just my two cents.
  • SimbathekatSimbathekat Posts: 140Registered Users
    Scuba Gal wrote: »
    DarkAngel wrote: »
    I only went to about half of my classes and they weren't helpful for the birth itself (general anesthesia) but they did include some helpful components. I got a tour of the hospital and picked up some great relaxation tips. That wasn't worth $300. My hospital provided a free class. Does yours not offer something free or at least cheaper?

    I'm in the Chicago area at the Northwestern Womens' Prentice Center (for those who are familiar) and the $300 covers a package of five courses. They don't offer any free classes. I've done more research in the Chicago area, and there aren't many options for birthing courses. Maybe I'll dig a bit deeper over the next two weeks. At the very least, I'll sign up for a couple of courses to benefit my S.O.

    I did/am delivering at Prentice and I didn't pay 300.00. But I only took 3 classes so maybe you can pay for the ones you want. I took the infant CPR and Breastfeeding class- then the Great Expectation class that is offered at Prentice and includes the tour. I had Maggie at the 'old' Prentice so I am not doing the tour of the new one (where I will have this baby) but that class alone was the best for Kevin because it gave him some realistic insight into what labor is like (medicated or not) as he had zero exposure.

    I do *think* that my OB offered classes too- so the CPR and maybe breastfeeding were done thru them and maybe that is why it is cheaper. I can give you the info if you are interested...

    Yes please! Send me a private message and let me know if you found the CPR, breastfeeding and Great Expectation courses helpful. I'll also ask my OB if she provides courses.
  • rainshowerrainshower Posts: 4,420Registered Users
    Ok, so it's about that time for me to start signing us up for birthing classes that'll run us about $300 (insurance doesn't cover). I am interested in the courses, but that money can go somewhere else. I know several people who've had their babies just fine without birthing know-how sessions.

    Do you think birthing classes really help with the process or are they just fun activities you can live without? Maybe I can just sign up for a few essentials like Infant CPR, Breastfeeding and Babies 101.

    $300? wow! i think mine was $75, and the classes were at my ob's office. we went to all of the classes and i found them quite helpful. they even brought in a couple who recently had a baby so that we could ask them various questions about their birth process.

    i found the breathing techniques quite helpful and employed them in both deliveries.

    you really won't know how helpful it will be until you are actually in labor.i always tell people that if for no other reason, the breathing served as a distraction to the pain of contractions while i was trying to focus on which breath was was supposed to be using! by the time i figured it out, the contraction was over! ha!

    in my lamaze class, i also learned about being overstimulated by touch. i didn't understand that until i was in labor with my first baby. i didn't want anyone touching me. my skin was super sensitive and people rubbing and stroking me was having the opposite effect of what they thought it should.

    i used all of the laboring positions that i was taught in the classes. i wasn't apprehensive about getting on all fours or leaning over the bed and rocking my waist. now it may be that without lamaze i would have discovered this on my own, but i'll never know.

    i think the my husband learned a lot too. he learned when to help and when to back off and not to take anything i say or do personally. our class went over the gamut of possible emotions and scenarios that could happen so that the mothers and coaches wouldn't be surprised. that's pretty much all a birthing class can do as no one can know how things will pan out until it actually happens.

    good luck with your class. try looking around for a less expensive one.
    "Dogs stink too, but I like dog stink." ~ rileyb
  • rainshowerrainshower Posts: 4,420Registered Users
    Scuba Gal wrote: »

    Insulting to say the least. Just because someone chooses to go with pain control options it doesn't mean they are some passive bystander in their own childs birth as you seem to (continuously) imply with your comments....



    I'm just stating fact. Most hospital births are interventive...meaning the natural birth process is intervened with. If you choose to go with pain medication, you really have very few choices...you HAVE to have everything that goes along with it, e.g. IV, continuous EFM, enforced bedrest, urinary catheters, pitocin, etc. You can't say no to those things if you say yes to an epidural, even if you want to think you can.

    I can see how this holds true somewhat. Wouldn't go so far to say that classes are unnecessary if one chose to get an epidural, but once the drug is introduced into your body you can no longer feel what's going on. How can you use techniques you've learned in birthing classes, when you can't feel your birth?

    Just my two cents.

    i didn't have c-sections or epidurals, but i know from friends who have that the anxiety of the needle injection and the surgical procedure can be relieved with focusing techniques, which birthing classes teach. just because you have a pain blocker or because you are having a c-section doesn't mean you can't get something beneficial from a birthing class.

    and since most women don't know if they'll have a c-section or epidural, it's good to be armed with as much info. about how to manage labor and delivery as possible.
    "Dogs stink too, but I like dog stink." ~ rileyb
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    rainshower wrote: »



    I'm just stating fact. Most hospital births are interventive...meaning the natural birth process is intervened with. If you choose to go with pain medication, you really have very few choices...you HAVE to have everything that goes along with it, e.g. IV, continuous EFM, enforced bedrest, urinary catheters, pitocin, etc. You can't say no to those things if you say yes to an epidural, even if you want to think you can.

    I can see how this holds true somewhat. Wouldn't go so far to say that classes are unnecessary if one chose to get an epidural, but once the drug is introduced into your body you can no longer feel what's going on. How can you use techniques you've learned in birthing classes, when you can't feel your birth?

    Just my two cents.

    i didn't have c-sections or epidurals, but i know from friends who have that the anxiety of the needle injection and the surgical procedure can be relieved with focusing techniques, which birthing classes teach. just because you have a pain blocker or because you are having a c-section doesn't mean you can't get something beneficial from a birthing class.

    and since most women don't know if they'll have a c-section or epidural, it's good to be armed with as much info. about how to manage labor and delivery as possible.


    If someone doesn't want an epidural, I think the hospital classes are counter productive. Independent classes are better and will usually teach coping techniques that will help avoid an epidural. Hospitals have a financial incentive for women to use epidurals, so it stands to reason that their classes are geared towards promoting the use of them.
  • M2LRM2LR Posts: 8,630Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    My hospital offered a birthing class. We took it for baby #1, and a "refresher" for baby #2 (even though she was a scheduled c-section, we felt that we wanted to refresh in case I went into labor).

    They were very thorough on non-medicated births and different methods for natural pain management (massage, breathing, etc). They were also very good about educating us on what getting an epidural meant - the time in which you need to get it done, how you can't walk around, how many of them tend to be counterproductive to the birthing process, 5 of epidural users who end up getting c-sections, etc. They also went over the c-section process, we watched a video, all of that.

    I liked it, I thought it was a good thing to do, even if I didn't end up using any of it.
    :rambo:
  • rainshowerrainshower Posts: 4,420Registered Users
    M2LR wrote: »
    My hospital offered a birthing class. We took it for baby #1, and a "refresher" for baby #2 (even though she was a scheduled c-section, we felt that we wanted to refresh in case I went into labor).

    They were very thorough on non-medicated births and different methods for natural pain management (massage, breathing, etc). They were also very good about educating us on what getting an epidural meant - the time in which you need to get it done, how you can't walk around, how many of them tend to be counterproductive to the birthing process, 5 of epidural users who end up getting c-sections, etc. They also went over the c-section process, we watched a video, all of that.

    I liked it, I thought it was a good thing to do, even if I didn't end up using any of it.

    that sounded like a good and thorough class you had. i only took the class with our first baby, thinking that i'd remembered everything with our second baby. my labor was so short with her that i didn't get to use most of the techniques that i did for our first baby.
    "Dogs stink too, but I like dog stink." ~ rileyb
  • deezee02deezee02 Posts: 1,509Registered Users
    I loved my childbirth classes. Although I knew a lot of the stuff would noit apply to me by that point (i already knew about Stevens heart condition), I did know i needed to be prepaired.

    My nurse who taught it was all about natural childbirth. She went through many techniques that i would not have known about. She also went over different kinds of pain relief besides an epidural.

    I also liked that she gave us a private tour after the main hospital tour. We went through exactly what would happen once he was born, where I would have to deliver at, the process ect.
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    Come swag with me!

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