Movies: Picnic at Hanging Rock & Five Days Discussion

ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
Picnic at Hanging Rock

Fig Jam,

Overall I enjoyed the movie. It started a tad slow for me, but kept my attention. I can't recall all of the girls names, but the pretty blond at the beginning seemed to know that something different was going to happen at the picnic.


Five Days (British TV mini-series)
I watched disc 1 (w/ 3 or 4 episodes) last night. It was great. I can't wait to receive disc 2 to find out if the mom if is found alive or dead and find out how she disappeared. how cute is rosie?
Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin

Comments

  • fig jamfig jam Posts: 2,555Registered Users
    Picnic at Hanging Rock:

    Overall, the pacing of the movie is slow (which seems appropriate for the pace of life at the turn of the last century, yes?) -- I think that's part of the turnoff for people who didn't like it. "Slow and nothing happens."
    But I actually liked the slow pace.

    Miranda (the blonde) and the girl with the long hair and glasses (scientific one?) seemed to have some premonition of something going to happen -- I think Sarah, the dark-haired girl left behind, said that Miranda had told her something that confirmed that.

    What do you think did happen on the rock? I've never really had a firm idea. Have you seen other Peter Weir films from the same era? He seemed preoccupied with the spirituality of the aboriginal peoples, esp the darker side of their beliefs, elemental forces and all that. That seems to me to be what he was hinting at but never said.

    And all that repressed Victorian sexuality! I think that was a big portion of the out-of-balance life he was commenting on . . .

    I don't think that it was a crime (that the girls were murdered or abducted). The biggest mystery to me is the one who survived but remembered nothing.

    By the way, the version they showed on TV the other day had HUGE sections cut out. I may have wandered out of the room and missed it, but I think they cut the whole doomed romance that started between the rescued girl and the young English boy who originally found her.

    Sorry to go on and on, but I've never met anyone else who's seen this movie, and I've been waiting years to discuss it!
    "Tell me, are you incapable of restraining yourself, or do you take pride in being an insufferable know-it-all?"

    "Honey Badger don't care!"
  • PartyHairPartyHair Posts: 7,713Registered Users
    Picnic at Hanging Rock? That's a book, right? Or maybe a short story?
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Rock on with your bad self.

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Be excellent to each other. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
  • fig jamfig jam Posts: 2,555Registered Users
    It was a book, made into a movie around 1975. I don't recall when the book was written.
    "Tell me, are you incapable of restraining yourself, or do you take pride in being an insufferable know-it-all?"

    "Honey Badger don't care!"
  • PartyHairPartyHair Posts: 7,713Registered Users
    fig jam wrote: »
    It was a book, made into a movie around 1975. I don't recall when the book was written.

    Cool. I saw the movie, too, eons ago.
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Rock on with your bad self.

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Be excellent to each other. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
  • ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
    fig jam wrote: »
    Picnic at Hanging Rock:

    Overall, the pacing of the movie is slow (which seems appropriate for the pace of life at the turn of the last century, yes?) -- I think that's part of the turnoff for people who didn't like it. "Slow and nothing happens."
    But I actually liked the slow pace.

    Miranda (the blonde) and the girl with the long hair and glasses (scientific one?) seemed to have some premonition of something going to happen -- I think Sarah, the dark-haired girl left behind, said that Miranda had told her something that confirmed that.

    What do you think did happen on the rock? I've never really had a firm idea. Have you seen other Peter Weir films from the same era? He seemed preoccupied with the spirituality of the aboriginal peoples, esp the darker side of their beliefs, elemental forces and all that. That seems to me to be what he was hinting at but never said.

    And all that repressed Victorian sexuality! I think that was a big portion of the out-of-balance life he was commenting on . . .

    I don't think that it was a crime (that the girls were murdered or abducted). The biggest mystery to me is the one who survived but remembered nothing.

    By the way, the version they showed on TV the other day had HUGE sections cut out. I may have wandered out of the room and missed it, but I think they cut the whole doomed romance that started between the rescued girl and the young English boy who originally found her.

    Sorry to go on and on, but I've never met anyone else who's seen this movie, and I've been waiting years to discuss it!

    What happened at the rock?

    Part of me feels that the girls disappeared to another dimension/time/freedom. Did you notice how the girls were in a trance when entering the rock?

    Do you think Sarah killed herself? Do you think she killed herself because she lost Miranda? Did Sarah ever figure out that the stable boy was her long lost brother?

    And yes...the survivor? Not remembering a thing...and why do you thing she returned? Did she not believe enough? Did she not really want to be free?

    And what about the teacher running down the street with her skirts missing? This is what the chubby girl said that she saw. Why was the teacher missing her clothes, especially her corset?

    And didn't the girls go in barefoot?

    I did see the TV version. I will get the Netflix version to see the missing sections.
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
  • fig jamfig jam Posts: 2,555Registered Users
    So, what did you think?
    "Tell me, are you incapable of restraining yourself, or do you take pride in being an insufferable know-it-all?"

    "Honey Badger don't care!"
  • ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
    i just responded... we posted at the same time!

    i forgot: i enjoyed the slower pace too.
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
  • fig jamfig jam Posts: 2,555Registered Users
    Well, I'm ticked! I jsut typed out a long reply and lost it!

    Sarah definitely killed herself. They cut out a short scene where you heard the crash of breaking glass outside the school (Sarah landing in the greenhouse). Sarah, as you know, had been seen looking up at a high window from inside the stairwell.

    I think she was in total despair at the prospect of being sent back to the orphanage. She and her brother had apparently been separated some years before -- sad because he was so close. He had a vision or dream of her the night she died, so in a way I guess she found him. They also cut a scene where she was in her bed, saying "Jesus, where are you, Bertie?" So you know she was thinking of him. I think it was just before she killed herself.

    I agree that there was something supernatural at work on the rock. The way they fell into a sort of trance, slept, and then wandered on. They removed their shoes and stockings, a symbol of freedom from constraints -- and the maid commented that the corset was missing from among the survivor's clothing.

    I was not sure what to make of Edith's (fat girl) story. She seemed a bit of a liar and hysteric -- I wasn't sure she really saw Greta McCraw on the rock. The timing seems off. McCraw definitely disappeared but if she was going up the rock and Edith was running down, how are the disappearances really connected? There was a strong hint of a lesbian attraction or relationship between Mrs. Appleyard and McCraw -- probably not realized or discussed between them, and part of the repression theme.

    Where do you think the Poe quote fit in: "What we see, and what we seem, are but a dream -- a dream within a dream"?
    "Tell me, are you incapable of restraining yourself, or do you take pride in being an insufferable know-it-all?"

    "Honey Badger don't care!"
  • StarmieStarmie Posts: 7,169Registered Users Curl Virtuoso
    I saw this years ago and have the book. Methinks I will have to rewatch and reread as there are bits you're talking about that ring no bells with me.
    3b in South Australia.
  • ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
    fig jam wrote: »
    Well, I'm ticked! I jsut typed out a long reply and lost it!

    Sarah definitely killed herself. They cut out a short scene where you heard the crash of breaking glass outside the school (Sarah landing in the greenhouse). Sarah, as you know, had been seen looking up at a high window from inside the stairwell.

    I think she was in total despair at the prospect of being sent back to the orphanage. She and her brother had apparently been separated some years before -- sad because he was so close. He had a vision or dream of her the night she died, so in a way I guess she found him. They also cut a scene where she was in her bed, saying "Jesus, where are you, Bertie?" So you know she was thinking of him. I think it was just before she killed herself.

    I agree that there was something supernatural at work on the rock. The way they fell into a sort of trance, slept, and then wandered on. They removed their shoes and stockings, a symbol of freedom from constraints -- and the maid commented that the corset was missing from among the survivor's clothing.

    I was not sure what to make of Edith's (fat girl) story. She seemed a bit of a liar and hysteric -- I wasn't sure she really saw Greta McCraw on the rock. The timing seems off. McCraw definitely disappeared but if she was going up the rock and Edith was running down, how are the disappearances really connected? There was a strong hint of a lesbian attraction or relationship between Mrs. Appleyard and McCraw -- probably not realized or discussed between them, and part of the repression theme.

    Where do you think the Poe quote fit in: "What we see, and what we seem, are but a dream -- a dream within a dream"?

    I am still thinking about the quote. At first blush, it seems as if perhaps the survivors dreamed the whole episode, and the girls were abducted. Thinking about it further, it seems to be saying that our now is not really real and at anytime, reality changes...still thinking about the quote.

    What about then ending? The stern headmother (can't think of her name) knowing that Sarah was not coming to dinner or the breakfast. She did lie to the French woman and say that her benefactor come for her.

    And what about the disappearance of the headmother? Do you think she found *freedom* and joined the girls?

    I never thought about the timing of the disappearances. Or perhaps Edith was woozy from her nap? I also wonder why the girls did not hear her calling their names? I realize they were in a trance, but it was a very deep trance. Why would Edith lie?
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin

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