Who are we? New dialogue on mixed race

Thought you guys might be interested in this.

http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/03/31/america/31race.php

Jenifer Bratter once wore a T-shirt in college that read "100 percent black woman." Her African-American friends would not have it.
"I remember getting a lot of flak because of the fact
I wasn't 100 percent black," said Bratter, 34, recalling her years at Penn State.

"I was very hurt by that," said Bratter, whose mother is black and whose father is white. "I remember feeling like, Isn't this what everybody expects me to think?"

Being accepted. Proving loyalty. Navigating the tight space between racial divides. Americans of mixed race say these are issues they have long confronted, and when Senator Barack Obama recently delivered a speech about race in Philadelphia, it rang with a special significance in their ears. They saw parallels between the path trod by Obama and their own.

Comments

  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    Probably very few Black people, especially those who have been a long time in the Americas, are literally "100% Black", so I assume the sentiment refers more to identity and personal feelings than to strict genetics. My cousin sent me a bunch of "I am Black" and "100% Black child" shirts for my son. I don't like those types of shirt, so he hasn't worn them.

    Interesting that anyone would think that these issues are coming up because of Barack. For me, they've always come up, and hearing them come up again in relation to Barack is a little tiresome!
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • CaliCali Posts: 475Registered Users
    Mixed race people don't really belong in a specific category..I figured that out on my own. When I went to christmas with my mothers family, I felt so weird because everyone was lightskinned and there's a little six year old sitting on the couch with caramel skin..when I went to christmas with my fathers family, I still didn't feel right because I was not as dark as everyone else.

    I don't think Barack Obama had anything to do with this..this has always been here.
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    "Women are made to be loved, not understood."
  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    Yeah, I think those types of shirts are more political than anything. Obviously, she's not 100% Black, and her friends are bogus for making her feel bad about wearing it.

    Saying one is biracial/multiracial (in a political context) doesn't really mean much, and it doesn't do anything to change race in America, IMO. You're still choosing a race. I'm not sure what the point is.
    Multiracial advocacy groups like the Mavin Foundation in Seattle say that mixed race people now find themselves better reflected in books, in college courses, in school brochures and in teacher's training in public schools than they did in the past.

    I don't get this.

    ***

    I'll admit that I'm very confused about this whole mixed thing. I don't understand mixed people that don't fit in, and I don't understand the people that won't let them fit in. I've never experienced anything like that. Of course, my experiences are different in that I'm two different minorities, as opposed to a minority and white. Perhaps that makes for different problems. I don't know. I am also a military brat and a high percentage of military brats are mixed. I'm used to seeing interracial marriages, and on some bases, they were more common than intraracial marriages. I understand that this isn't everyone's experiences, and hearing the stories of other mixed peoples' lives on NC has really opened up my eyes.
    3c/4a
  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    Cali wrote: »
    Mixed race people don't really belong in a specific category..I figured that out on my own. When I went to christmas with my mothers family, I felt so weird because everyone was lightskinned and there's a little six year old sitting on the couch with caramel skin..when I went to christmas with my fathers family, I still didn't feel right because I was not as dark as everyone else.

    I don't think Barack Obama had anything to do with this..this has always been here.

    Huh? lol
    3c/4a
  • TwoMoonsTwoMoons Posts: 754Registered Users
    When I was still going to school I used to hate that one box titled Ethnic Background because it always says check one. That was so hard for me because I felt like if I checked one then I'm rejecting the other so I just opted for putting other down. Before this whole Obama thing kids at school always tried to make me choose a side. I decided long ago that if I couldn't be one then I wouldn't be the other either. Biracial/Multiracial is like a race of it's own.
    :coffee::bunny::cat::headbang:OTAKU 4 LIFE!!!!

    "Some people say that cats are sneaky, evil, and cruel. True, and they have many other fine qualities as well.”

    I <3 Cats!
  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    Biracial/Multiracial is like a race of it's own.

    How can that be? I don't doubt that biracial/multiracial people have much in common, but what if they are a mixture of different races? How does a Native American/white person relate to a black/Asian person when it comes to race and culture?
    3c/4a
  • TwoMoonsTwoMoons Posts: 754Registered Users
    Po wrote: »
    Biracial/Multiracial is like a race of it's own.

    How can that be? I don't doubt that biracial/multiracial people have much in common, but what if they are a mixture of different races? How does a Native American/white person relate to a black/Asian person when it comes to race and culture?

    All caucasians don't have the same culture, the same with blacks but they're still one race. Native Americans and Asians have alot in common culture wise, so their is alot of things those two groups can relate too. I guess what I am saying is that we all need to stick together because we are all going threw the same struggle.
    :coffee::bunny::cat::headbang:OTAKU 4 LIFE!!!!

    "Some people say that cats are sneaky, evil, and cruel. True, and they have many other fine qualities as well.”

    I <3 Cats!
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    Doesn't Barack Obama generally refer to himself, and isn't he referred to by others, as Black most of the time? When did he become a mixed-race movement poster child?
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,059 Administrator
    He always was but his Wright speech solidified it.

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