Africa is not a country!!!

curlaciouscurlacious Registered Users Posts: 69
Back in 96 I started dating a guy from Kenya (he's my husband now) and my eyes were opened to how ignorant Americans can be :cry: . It is sooo pathetic that the only thing that we know of any of the countries of Africa is what we see on the Discovery channel. Unfortunately, this channel only portrays the tribes of people who still carry on with traditions, but no one realizes that they are in the minority!!! The are cities, as large as, and ,as advanced as, cities here in the US. You would not believe how many times my husband was asked if he wore clothes growing up or if he lived in a hut. Or my fave, if he had ever been chased by lions!! :shock: How ig is that??? I get equally annoyed when reports are on the news and instead of naming city, country like they do for any other country (i.e. Dublin, Ireland) they say something like Nigeria, Africa. They perpetuate ignorance and I really truly hate it. Sorry to rant, but it drives me crazy! :evil: Africa is not a country, nor is Nigeria a city in it!
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Comments

  • curlyarcacurlyarca Registered Users Posts: 8,449 Curl Connoisseur
    good post and good points.

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  • starfishbluesstarfishblues Registered Users Posts: 49
    i agree totally. one of my best friends is half-nigerian and she complains about this ALL the time. it really is sad how uninformed so many people are.
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  • alguma pessoaalguma pessoa Registered Users Posts: 619
    Thank you for starting this thread!

    I am tired of people referring to Africa as if it is one homogenous country or an area of "the big five" animals, safaris, drought, war, and beggars. I have friends from very different parts of Africa and their cultures are all different and they do not look the same.

    I hate when people from the media talk about France, Germany, Japan, etc. and then group Africa together.

    A guy from my high school wanted to learn "African." WTF?

    Most of the world only knows about African countries because of war and famine and do not know its geography, rich pre-colonial history, or cultural differences. They only know the post-colonial conflicts and have no idea what the roots of conflicts are and think it is because "those people do not know how to get along."

    I hate when Black Americans talk about going "home" to Africa as if Africa is one homogenous place. Most of the Black American's who visited Africa go to the "cliche-ish" countries such as South Africa, Ghana, and Ethiopia and still come back not knowing anything else about Africa besides safaris, dashikis, and Nubian queens and kings.

    I hate when certain people go to Africa to "help out those unfortunate souls" and all the while condescendingly equating adult Africans with vulnerable children who should be fortunate that Westerners are helping their countries. What these type of people are really doing is easing their conscious to make them feel that they are doing a good deed.
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  • curlaciouscurlacious Registered Users Posts: 69
    Cehua,
    I totally agree with your feelings that many are uneducated about the countries of Africa. Many cannot not name more than one or two. My husband told me to mention that he was recently asked on two separate occasions, by two people totally unrelated "Where are you from?"
    "Guess," he says.
    "You're either from Nigeria, or Africa." Both people said this and they didn't say South Africa they specifically said that they thought that Nigeria and Africa are two separate countries. :shock:
    Anywho, as far as African-Americans go, my family is sadly among those uneducated about the difference in cultures and perpetuate negative stereotypes. My mom warned me that "all African men beat their women" and grandfather (bless his old soul) asked about "wild people that didn't comb their hair and never associated with others". Like I said, the media helps to perpetuate this lack of knowledge by only showing things like war, famine, poverty, and illness. Yes, those things happen, but they're not the only things happening over there. But "no news is good news" and I guess good news is no news either :roll: [/quote]
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  • curlyarcacurlyarca Registered Users Posts: 8,449 Curl Connoisseur
    oh i just got an idea for a spinoff thread! to the nonhair board! :wink:

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  • *Ani**Ani* Registered Users Posts: 351
    Cehua wrote:
    I hate when Black Americans talk about going "home" to Africa as if Africa is one homogenous place.

    What would you have black Americans say when we, in general, do not know what country in African our relatives come from as a result of the slave trade?

    Also, isnt there something inherently positive and powerful about African-Amerians not being subjected to the nationalism that has proved so devastating to a majority of the world..and instead have embraced Africa as a whole.

    And yes, Africa is a very diverse place and yet there are common cultural threads throughout the continent.

    Instead of criticizing African-Americans for their travel choices, perhaps it would be better if you educated them regarding your personal experiences in Africa and turned them onto the locals that you think they would benefit from visiting.

    The fact that African-Americans over the last 400 years despite negative indoctrination about their continent of origin, have sought to embrace Africa and it's traditions (even if to you only on a superficial basis) is a very powerful first step.
    On Rush Limbaugh: Rather than engage in the admittedly difficult task of justifying GOP policies rationally, the key to Limbaugh’s success is attracting an audience that actually yearns to be lied to.
  • CherishCherish Registered Users Posts: 1,847
    AnikaNA wrote:
    What would you have black Americans say when we, in general, do not know what country in African our relatives come from as a result of the slave trade?

    I would have them study up on the continent as a whole, and develop an interest in specific countries they hope to visit.
    Also, isnt there something inherently positive and powerful about African-Amerians not being subjected to the nationalism that has proved so devastating to a majority of the world..and instead have embraced Africa as a whole.

    Agreed. But part of that embracing should be accompanied by self-education.
    And yes, Africa is a very diverse place and yet there are common cultural threads throughout the continent.

    Instead of criticizing African-Americans for their travel choices, perhaps it would be better if you educated them regarding your personal experiences in Africa and turned them onto the locals that you think they would benefit from visiting.

    Again, I believe the onus is on that individual to seek out that knowledge by asking questions of those they meet, or doing research - very easy these days with the internet.

    The fact that African-Americans over the last 400 years despite negative indoctrination about their continent of origin, have sought to embrace Africa and it's traditions (even if to you only on a superficial basis) is a very powerful first step.

    Agreed.
  • *Ani**Ani* Registered Users Posts: 351
    Cherish wrote:

    I would have them study up on the continent as a whole, and develop an interest in specific countries they hope to visit.

    Who is to say that African-Americans have not "studied up" on the country they wish to visit?

    The point is, if someone has a problem with people visiting Ghana, Kenya, Egypt, or where ever....why not tell them where they should be visiting.

    I have no problem with someone visiting those countries.

    To criticize "black americans" for wearing dashikis and visiting certain countries is patently absurd.

    People can visit whatever countries they choose and if they feel they are connecting to their "home"land by wearing one stripe of African clothing, there is really no reason to criticize them for it.

    I for one am sick of the divisiveness that some people seek to create between Africans throughout the diaspora.

    It is offensive and crazy to separate yourself from other black people by claiming that "black americans" do this and that when the reality is that we as African people have suffered so greatly throughout our recent history the fact that we have any self identity nevertheless a very strong one that would prompt people to reconnect with where they come from is worthy of praise and not criticism.

    People who seek to be divisive about Africans in Africa versus Africans in America or elsewhere really ought to take a long pause and ask themselves why.
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  • CherishCherish Registered Users Posts: 1,847
    Um... I'm going to assume you're not addressing me in most of your post because you've lost me. I suspect you're combining conversations from elsewhere or from real life encounters.

    I was responding to the point about people who say they are going to Africa, without even realizing it's not a country. My point: do research.
  • *Ani**Ani* Registered Users Posts: 351
    Cherish wrote:
    I was responding to the point about people who say they are going to Africa, without even realizing it's not a country. My point: do research.

    I am quite sure that anyone who has plans to travel to Africa realizes that it is not a country.

    There is really no reason to criticize African-Americans for travelling to Africa.

    And I was originally responding to this message. I have no idea why you replied to my original post.
    I hate when Black Americans talk about going "home" to Africa as if Africa is one homogenous place. Most of the Black American's who visited Africa go to the "cliche-ish" countries such as South Africa, Ghana, and Ethiopia and still come back not knowing anything else about Africa besides safaris, dashikis, and Nubian queens and kings.
    On Rush Limbaugh: Rather than engage in the admittedly difficult task of justifying GOP policies rationally, the key to Limbaugh’s success is attracting an audience that actually yearns to be lied to.
  • CherishCherish Registered Users Posts: 1,847
    I replied to you to expand on the position you quoted and hopefully offer some clarity there. I don't care if it's a non-black or non-American person saying they are going to Europe or Asia, thinking either continent is a country. My response would be the same. I don't like people to be misinformed.

    However... I checked your recent posts (research ;) ) and now see where you're really coming from/going (and I agree, mostly).

    Carry on.
  • alguma pessoaalguma pessoa Registered Users Posts: 619
    AnikaNA wrote:
    And I was originally responding to this message. I have no idea why you replied to my original post.
    I hate when Black Americans talk about going "home" to Africa as if Africa is one homogenous place. Most of the Black American's who visited Africa go to the "cliche-ish" countries such as South Africa, Ghana, and Ethiopia and still come back not knowing anything else about Africa besides safaris, dashikis, and Nubian queens and kings.

    The above quote and everything else I wrote in my previous post has to do with people calling Africa either a country or referring to it as a homogenous place. I specifically said Black Americans here since Black Americans have been the only people I have know who say going "home" to Africa. Many of my friends from Ghana, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Mali, Senegal, Capo Verde, Angola, etc. are quite offended when they hear people talking about going home to Africa. They are not offended because Blacks are embracing Africa but because *some* Blacks (and in my and my friend's experiences they are usually the ones who say "going home to Africa") are embracing the romanticized or cliche view of what Africa is.

    Take the time to be educated about the countries you visit and do not assume Africa is all about the "big five," dashikis (my friend from Ghana laughs at that one), safaris, pyramids, and Nelson Mandela. That is all they are saying and that is all I meant when I wrote that. It seems that others understood that when I wrote it and you are the only one who misunderstood.

    If you are upset because I wrote Black Americans well, I addressed other people's ignorance (i.e., the world view) in referring to Africa too. I specifically said Black Americans because of the "going home" aspect. And if you are "going home" then you should research the different cultures of Africa to understand it better. Once you are there seek to understand the unique cultures. Go beyond being a tourist and broaden your understanding of the place. That is all.

    Instead of "going home to Africa" why not I am going to visit Cameroon, Ghana, and Angola. And you should also realize that French is spoken in Cameroon, English in Ghana, and Portuguese in Angola. Learn up on the history and culture before you go. And if you already know that fine. Usually when people know it they do not say "going home to Africa," Africa is a big place. Please specify and do not generalize.

    I expect all people of the world to know the difference between a country and a continent whether is is Asia, Europe, NA, etc. I expect all people of the world to know that Africa is not one country. And I especially expect Black people who consider themselves Afro-centric and want to connect with the motherland to know the difference.

    My post was not meant to be a criticism of Black Americans going to Africa, which countries they choose to go to, or what they choose to wear. It is a criticism of buying into cliches and misinformation (the theme of this thread).

    And since Cherish wrote exactly what I would have written I will repeat it:
    Cherish wrote:
    AnikaNA wrote:
    What would you have black Americans say when we, in general, do not know what country in African our relatives come from as a result of the slave trade?

    I would have them study up on the continent as a whole, and develop an interest in specific countries they hope to visit.
    Also, isnt there something inherently positive and powerful about African-Amerians not being subjected to the nationalism that has proved so devastating to a majority of the world..and instead have embraced Africa as a whole.

    Agreed. But part of that embracing should be accompanied by self-education.
    And yes, Africa is a very diverse place and yet there are common cultural threads throughout the continent.

    Instead of criticizing African-Americans for their travel choices, perhaps it would be better if you educated them regarding your personal experiences in Africa and turned them onto the locals that you think they would benefit from visiting.

    Again, I believe the onus is on that individual to seek out that knowledge by asking questions of those they meet, or doing research - very easy these days with the internet.

    The fact that African-Americans over the last 400 years despite negative indoctrination about their continent of origin, have sought to embrace Africa and it's traditions (even if to you only on a superficial basis) is a very powerful first step.

    Agreed.
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  • AmnerisAmneris Registered Users Posts: 15,117
    AnikaNA, I would have posted exactly what you did, and I agree completely with every word.

    (Cehua, you know I still love you!)
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • alguma pessoaalguma pessoa Registered Users Posts: 619
    I did not say I disagreed with everything AnikaNA wrote. I said that she missed my point which is:

    Do not refer to Africa as a homogeneous place regardless of your "race" and ESPECIALLY do not do it if you if you are trying to get in touch with your ancestry/heritage/Afro-centric-ness/etc. You can connect to Africa without lumping all of the countries together and even if you do not see it as offensive many Africans see it as so.

    Everyone should realize that Africa is unique and diverse and more often than not people in those countries do not act or talk like what is portrayed by the media, hollywood, and TV. Do your research before you (general you) arrive and when you get to your destination (s) apreciate it, respect it, understand it, and connect with it.

    Lumping African culture together is a huge pet peeve of my friends from various African countries (and I hear them complain about it a lot) but they laugh it off as ignorance.

    And as a geographer it is doubly offensive to me.

    And this is not directed at any person on this board. It is a general observation that I was made aware of because of my friends from various African countries.

    That's all I'm saying.



    ETA: Here is an example:

    There is a Pan-American Indian movement in which groups like the League of Sovereign Indian Nations (LISN) are connecting with Native American nations across North, Central, and South America. Yes, they recognize that there is a "Nativeness" that all Native Americans/Aborigines/American Indians/Alaskan Natives have but they also recognize that each nation is distinct and has a unique culture.

    They will get offended if you lump their culture together as one homogeneous culture even though they all are proud to identify as Native. Examples would be to assume all Native nations use feather head dresses or all of their dances are the same etc. Assuming that Dakota culture is the same as Mexica culture is just as absurd as assuming Ethiopian culture is the same as Angolan culture.



    Or another more tangible analogy is the concept of family. A family is made up of distinct individuals. However, there is a common bond that makes them a family. You should never assume that just because people come from the same family that they their personalities, likes and dislikes, etc are the same.

    My sister and I may have the same parents and look alike but our own experiences and perceptions make us individuals just like geography, history, etc. makes each African country unique.

    My sister and I would get annoyed if you confused us and the people I know who are from Africa get annoyed when you lump together Africa as a homogenous area and assume their culture is the same as their neighbor's culture.

    So if you will, you could think of Africa as a big family with unique individuals. Just because these countries share a continent does not make them the same.

    And know a little (or a lot) about the past and modern history, geography, cuisine, and language of the countries you (general you) are going to before you (general you) get to your destination(s). And while you are there try to increase your knowledge. To not do something as small as that is pure ignorance (at the least).

    That is my point. And this could apply to any other place on Earth and not just countries in Africa. Do the research!
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  • AmnerisAmneris Registered Users Posts: 15,117
    Cehua wrote:
    I did not say I disagreed with everything AnikaNA wrote. I said that she missed my point which is:

    Do not refer to Africa as a homogeneous place regardless of your "race" and ESPECIALLY do not do it if you if you are trying to get in touch with your ancestry/heritage/Afro-centric-ness/etc. You can connect to Africa without lumping all of the countries together and even if you do not see it as offensive many Africans see it as so.


    I do not see a problem with referring to Africa as "Africa." When people are going to Europe, they say they are going to Europe, not Spain, France, Germany, Italy, England and Hungary. People realize what "going to Europe" means. We refer to Latin America as one land mass even though the cultures and countries there are VERY different, from small English-speaking Caribbean islands of primarily Black people to large, southern Argentina with many more white people, because there are other commonalities in the geographic area that make it Latin America.

    America and Canada are huge countries. You can spend a month seeing the US and not see a lot of things. Africa, Europe and Latin America have smaller countries closer together, so when you go, chances are you will see 3 or 4 or more separate nations. We who are used to living in a big area are more in tune with the big area of Africa or Europe rather than naming each country. People from small countries are much more aware of being distinct from other small countries. It's just a different perception.

    Africa is no different - plus there actually is a pan-African movement whose explicit political goal is to unite all the African countries and members of the diaspora in the Americas for political strength. So there are many people, African or not, who want to see Africa as one nation (the South African anthem begins "God bless Africa...") Furthermore, most of the countries in Africa, as elsewhere, were arbitrarily and artificially carved out by European colonizers, dividing religious, tribal and linguistic groups, and have led to many of the problems in Africa today, so I see no need to be overly hung up on respecting borders.



    Everyone should realize that Africa is unique and diverse and more often than not people in those countries do not act or talk like what is portrayed by the media, hollywood, and TV. Do your research before you (general you) arrive and when you get to your destination (s) apreciate it, respect it, understand it, and connect with it.

    Lumping African culture together is a huge pet peeve of my friends from various African countries (and I hear them complain about it a lot) but they laugh it off as ignorance.


    I think if people are actually taking the time to go to Africa, spending money there, they are going to realize that and have their eyes opened big-time. As AnikaNA pointed out, it is HUGE for any members of the disapora to even get as far as going to Africa. For centuries we were taught to hate, repudiate and fear Africa as a violent hell-hole with naked savages running around, to try and change African features to European ones, to look to Europe as the place of learning and culture. That we are now showing an interest in our ancestry is major. Desiring to wear a dashiki or head wrap instead of thinking the only professional and decent clothing is a suit is a wonderful thing. And white people were told so many untruths about Africa and still see so much negativity about it on the media as we do, so if they are now seeing the beauty and wonder of Africa, however undeveloped their interest, that is great!

    Also, as AnikaNA pointed out, how do you expect the Diaspora to know exactly where in Africa we are from? It can be done - my family did some research and we think we were a Muslim family from what is now Senegal, but we don't know for sure, and there was no "Senegal" then. We can assume most Diaspora members come from West Africa somewhere, and a great place all of us should visit is the slave station at Goree (I lived in Africa for a while but I did not have the chance to see this - I plan to at some point in the not-too-distant future, but my husband is scared of going to Africa and doesn't see the point - there is a prime example of a Disapora member who has been so separated from his roots - if he gets to the point of wanting to go that would be an improvement.) Beyond that, the continent of Africa is a blank slate for the Diaspora. The mere act of visiting a Third World country is going to open people's eyes to a lot of things - they don't need to be chastized before they begin this process.

    Furthermore, just because your African friends are complaining about us does not mean that their argument has merit. I have many African friends as well, but for every African I've met that respects members of the Diaspora and sees us as related in the struggle, I've met one who is disdainful towards Black American and Caribbean people. Some see us as unworthy, tainted, mixed-blood people of low status that they sold as slaves - even as an embarassment, at the same time that they resent us for being citizens of more privileged countries. Most recently, my husband was asked by an African at his work where he was from. When he said that his parents come from Grenada, the guy made a face and turned away. My husband asked the guy where he was from and he said "What do you care? You don't know anything about Africa" and walked away.

    I would like more unity with people from the continent of Africa, but at the same time I know my history sets me apart and they were, willingly or unwillingly, complicit in it, so I am not going to take everything they say as gospel truth. And for them to call us ignorant means nothing to me. I am sure they are ignorant about a whole lot of things that we know all about. For instance, don't many of them talk about "America" as this one, golden land of opportunity without realizing what a diverse country it is, with a north-south cultural divide, Alaska and Hawaii and all? How much research do THEY do on America beyond New York and the statue of liberty, Hollywood and Disneyland? Ignorance is in the eye of the beholder.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • LayaliLayali Registered Users Posts: 561 Curl Connoisseur
    My parents are African immigrants and I’ve lived on three different countries on the continent. I can tell you that Africans across the continent resent it when we’re put under one big umbrella. Most of us find it incredibly insulting. Yes, common ties unite us, but we are an amazingly diverse group of people in every way possible—history, tribe, ethnicity, race, religion, language, lifestyle, etc. If you can’t acknowledge this, you definitely cannot respect or understand us. The Pan-African movement places a huge emphasis on this as well.

    Amneris wrote:
    Furthermore, just because your African friends are complaining about us does not mean that their argument has merit. I have many African friends as well, but for every African I've met that respects members of the Diaspora and sees us as related in the struggle, I've met one who is disdainful towards Black American and Caribbean people. Some see us as unworthy, tainted, mixed-blood people of low status that they sold as slaves - even as an embarassment, at the same time that they resent us for being citizens of more privileged countries. Most recently, my husband was asked by an African at his work where he was from. When he said that his parents come from Grenada, the guy made a face and turned away. My husband asked the guy where he was from and he said "What do you care? You don't know anything about Africa" and walked away.

    I would like more unity with people from the continent of Africa, but at the same time I know my history sets me apart and they were, willingly or unwillingly, complicit in it, so I am not going to take everything they say as gospel truth. And for them to call us ignorant means nothing to me. I am sure they are ignorant about a whole lot of things that we know all about. For instance, don't many of them talk about "America" as this one, golden land of opportunity without realizing what a diverse country it is, with a north-south cultural divide, Alaska and Hawaii and all? How much research do THEY do on America beyond New York and the statue of liberty, Hollywood and Disneyland? Ignorance is in the eye of the beholder.

    Amneris, I’m not really sure why you felt the need to add this last bit. I hope you realize you are talking about the teeniest, tiniest fraction of the African population. As you probably know, it goes both ways. I’ve met more Black North Americans who are bitter and mean towards Black Africans, than vice versa. I’ve personally witnessed people get angry and frustrated with Black African immigrants who have become successful in short amounts of time. Like, we’ve taken away what should be theirs or something…extremely competitive.

    Why can’t we celebrate the diversity within the global Black community without it being labeled as divisive?
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  • CherishCherish Registered Users Posts: 1,847
    If one has the desire to go to Europe (want doesn't mean it will happen), one should know something about their intended destinations and not presume it's a country and run around spouting off all kinds of ignorance. There is no defense for ignorance about geographical places of interest in this day and age.

    I don't know it all, but what I do know is how to find information that I need. I place no burden on anyone but myself to educate me on the areas where I lack the necessary info and awarenesses. There is no shame in not knowing, but there is (should be) shame in reveling in that ignorance.

    I don't consider it a "black thing" at all, which is why I stayed out of this thread initially. I find it's pretty common amongst people in the so-called first world to want to lump all the 3rd world together... more or less as "other there".

    Bashing Africans (me), Amneris, does nothing to support your argument,
    in fact, it just makes you sound like you never had a legit one.
  • *Ani**Ani* Registered Users Posts: 351
    Cherish wrote:
    Bashing Africans (me), Amneris, does nothing to support your argument,
    in fact, it just makes you sound like you never had a legit one.

    You are right.

    I was born in Ohio, but I too would consider myself an African.

    My daughter goes to an African-centered school where Africans born in America, in Africa, and elsewhere getting along wonderfully. There are such similarities and strength in African culture that it has survived amazingly in such disparate places throughout the world.

    I dont think we should be bashing each other, whether born on the continent of Africa or not.

    I dont think it's fair to say that Africans were complicit in the slave trade because it was a very small number of Africans who were complicit and that does not indict us all.

    I am glad someone mentioned the pan African movement and that should certainly include Africans throughout the diaspora.

    I always thought that we (African Americans) were somewhat fortunate in that we could embrace the entire continent and not have provinicial nationalistic ideas about whatever particular country we came from.

    Finally, I have been lucky to have many friends who originate from many different countries in the world and I have always felt so welcome, warm, and like part of a great big family around these African people.
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  • SuperSoftCoilsSuperSoftCoils Registered Users Posts: 36
    curlacious wrote:
    I get equally annoyed when reports are on the news and instead of naming city, country like they do for any other country (i.e. Dublin, Ireland) they say something like Nigeria, Africa. They perpetuate ignorance and I really truly hate it. Sorry to rant, but it drives me crazy! :evil: Africa is not a country, nor is Nigeria a city in it!

    I din't think most people mean to be rude when that happens, i think they maybe assume we don't know much about African geography. i know some people who do that sometimes when talking to a multi-ethnic group, and they'll say something like i was in Egypt-Africa ot Zaire-Africa (sp?), etc... Just to clarify to the group of people they're speaking with and while many people are more familiar with the geography of the continent, i think there was a time when a lot of people had little exposure to African geography...

    Although ITA with the whole lion-chasing stuff, that's a bit over the top to ask someone, but i know that a lot of times when you see an African country on television, it will be in a veeeery rural area and we seldom see the metropolitain parts of Africa and its countries... But, I guess the people who do those shows are only interested in the areas where wildlife is still prevelant.
    super soft coils
  • SuperSoftCoilsSuperSoftCoils Registered Users Posts: 36
    curlacious wrote:
    I get equally annoyed when reports are on the news and instead of naming city, country like they do for any other country (i.e. Dublin, Ireland) they say something like Nigeria, Africa. They perpetuate ignorance and I really truly hate it. Sorry to rant, but it drives me crazy! :evil: Africa is not a country, nor is Nigeria a city in it!

    I din't think most people mean to be rude when that happens, i think they maybe assume we don't know much about African geography. i know some people who do that sometimes when talking to a multi-ethnic group, and they'll say something like i was in Egypt-Africa ot Zaire-Africa (sp?), etc... Just to clarify to the group of people they're speaking with and while many people are more familiar with the geography of the continent, i think there was a time when a lot of people had little exposure to African geography...

    Although ITA with the whole lion-chasing stuff, that's a bit over the top to ask someone, but i know that a lot of times when you see an African country on television, it will be in a veeeery rural area and we seldom see the metropolitain parts of Africa and its countries... But, I guess the people who do those shows are only interested in the areas where wildlife is still prevelant.
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  • kurlikinkiklassickurlikinkiklassic Registered Users Posts: 117 Curl Novice
    pls don't bite my head off..but, i can tell that there are some vey educated women who have participated in this thread. i just want to say that from the outside (from an observer's standpoint) it kinda looks like "black people doing what they do best, fighting each other"

    i don't think that's your purpose, but others may not see it that way.

    that's all, pls don't take this personally. i can't and won't take any of you on.

    Hope where ever you are you happy and blessed. :happy1:
    Can we just be ourselves?? Embrace who you are completely --God doesn't make mistakes

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