CurlTalk

Is a Texturizer a Relaxer?

mariag002mariag002 Posts: 3,557Registered Users
I found this at 3:00am (I'm working), half asleep and it really made me mad. Is a texturizer a relaxer? Why do we have to put this garbage on our babies?

Original website: /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.sunflower-mom.blogspot.com%2F" class="Popup

Message from the Hair Care Expert: Why Texture Softener is NOT a relaxer


There has been a decade long misconception about relaxers, texturizers and now Texture Softener. In essence a relaxer is designed to take the hair from A to Z. That is to straighten any type of over-curly hair...100% straight. To get the hair straight, you have to use a manual process, by smoothing it out either using your hands or a comb. Alternatively, the Texture Softener has the same basic technology, but you do not use the hand or comb to straighten the hair. Texture Softener is buffered by the exclusive anti-breakage Sunflower Oil Formula which acts to gently protect the texture of the hair and infuse moisture throughout the process, yielding a much different product AND OUTCOME. Realizing that there had to be a happy medium between 100% straight and 100% natural, the makers of Just For Me saught to develop a safe, gentle way that would give mom's an alternative. The Texture Softener in essence gives a girl the best of both worlds; hair thats easy to comb, soft and managable with ability to retain her natural texture.

If you read the comments someone said she is misleading consumers. I'd post the answer to that question, but it made no sense and I got a headache. :sad8:
- Maria

Big Chop: 9/23/07
Relaxer free for almost 5 years!

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Comments

  • Hairblogger â„¢Hairblogger â„¢ Posts: 564Registered Users
    Yes.

    All chemical stylers (hair dye, or highlights for example) are not relaxers, but Anything used to chemically straighten, curl, set , wave, texturize, (chemically) silken or soften the hair is a form of relaxer.

    Chemical color is not a relaxer, but it is a chemical styler.

    And since No Conditioner will require a neutralizing rinse. And No conditioner causes burns to the scalp or hair if left unattended. You know what the grounds for your lawsuit will be if someone gives you a chemical service or modified chem-service without your permission.
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  • Mo_Gemini22Mo_Gemini22 Posts: 485Registered Users
    Someone in the "straightening/relaxing" forum was asking about texturizers and listed the site to the Texture Softner. I almost thought about getting a Texture Softner for my hair! Hopefully the person who was aksing about texurizers will read the posts over here.
    Last relaxer - July 07
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  • mariag002mariag002 Posts: 3,557Registered Users
    Mo_Gemini22 I saw her question and was curious so I googled it. My niece had a "soft relaxer" or whatever you call it (in spanish we call it alisado) when she was about 5 yrs old. She has 4b hair and my sister was having a hard time combing her hair. At first it looked cute, but then after a while it started to cost my sister lots of money to keep taking her to a salon. After a while he hair looked crispy and really dry. I think that's way too young to get any chemicals in your hair. I think that a kid should be at least 13 yrs old and have the option to get one.

    If the original poster gets a texturizer, at least she's old enough to maintain it and know what she's getting.
    - Maria

    Big Chop: 9/23/07
    Relaxer free for almost 5 years!

  • missmoniemissmonie Posts: 920Registered Users
    The illustration on the site to show the "before" and "after" is interesting. Actually....I think it's pretty ridiculous...but I guess it's all about marketing! Can't you just detangle the hair while wet to get the same effect?


    how_texture_work.jpg
    4a: Combo of tight coils and waves; Last relaxer - 11/05 (LC - 4/07) - /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2Fmissmonie%2F" class="Popup - updates as of Mar '09

    Products: Trader Joe's condish * Giovanni Direct Leave in * Fantasia Gel or KCCC for curl definition * Karen's Body Beautiful Hair Cream as moisturizer

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  • eccentric_kurlzeccentric_kurlz Posts: 4,144Registered Users
    It is a relaxer in sheep's clothing. The main "relaxing" ingredients are calcium hyrdroxide and guanidine carbonate. The calcium hydroxide is an alkaline that is substituted for lye in "no-lye" relaxers, which is actually worse for the hair than sodium hydroxide(lye). When used in combination with guanidine carbonate, they create a permanent waving affect(what the hair industry calls 'texturizing'), but can still straighten the hair. Any chemical that alters the structure of the hair has the potential to straighten the hair. Period. Even with some hair dyes, you can potentially relax the curl.

    I believe Webbie(Webjockey) posted something about this product and that blog in the "hall of shame" forum. I think it's disgusting that the hair care industry is misleading parents who may not have an idea of how to care for their children's hair. Yeah....just slap on some chemicals to make your child's hair "manageable". :eyeroll:. Everyone's hair is manageable, you just have to have the patience. I just think they give parents false hopes that this product is going to be the "miracle product", and not realize that there is still important maintenance involved, even after its use.
    A wonderful mix of coils, curls, corkscrews, and kinks.

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  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    It is a relaxer in sheep's clothing. The main "relaxing" ingredients are calcium hyrdroxide and guanidine carbonate. The calcium hydroxide is an alkaline that is substituted for lye in "no-lye" relaxers, which is actually worse for the hair than sodium hydroxide(lye). When used in combination with guanidine carbonate, they create a permanent waving affect(what the hair industry calls 'texturizing'), but can still straighten the hair. Any chemical that alters the structure of the hair has the potential to straighten the hair. Period. Even with some hair dyes, you can potentially relax the curl.


    totally true. even in salons, they use the same relaxer to "texturize" hair. the only difference is the application and the amount of time its left on. plus a relaxer's job isnt to straighten your hair, its just to "relax" the natural texture. that common misconception is why so many people get jacked up with relaxers, trying to get their hair bone straight.

    no lye relaxers/texturizers leave your hair a mess anyway.

    but to each his own.
  • SuburbanbushbabeSuburbanbushbabe Posts: 15,402Registered Users
    • DON'T use any No-Lye or No-Base Relaxer product with Just For
    Me™ Texture Softener™.
    • DON'T apply Texture Softener™ to hair permed with ammonium
    thiogylocolate (curly perm) or bleached hair.

    WARNING:
    This product is not a toy. This product contains calcium hydroxide and guanidine carbonate (toxic). Keep out of the reach of children.
    No amount of sunflower oil can change the fact that this is a relaxer. Their marketing is deceptive. Not to mention if you go to the product site, the graphics and sound are totally geared toward children and young teens. They have gone over to the dark side with the cigarette manufacturers.
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  • missmoniemissmonie Posts: 920Registered Users
    I believe Webbie(Webjockey) posted something about this product and that blog in the "hall of shame" forum. I think it's disgusting that the hair care industry is misleading parents who may not have an idea of how to care for their children's hair. Yeah....just slap on some chemicals to make your child's hair "manageable". :eyeroll:. Everyone's hair is manageable, you just have to have the patience. I just think they give parents false hopes that this product is going to be the "miracle product", and not realize that there is still important maintenance involved, even after its use.

    I agree. I don't think chemicals should be the only alternative. I suppose some parents of bi-racial children find it to be pretty daunting...but it's possible to care for natural hair without this so called "miracle product". I found this quote online about the product which sorta ticks me off:

    The product, Soft & Beautiful Just For Me Texture Softener, is intended as an alternative to hair pressing or relaxing. It launched last spring as an extension of A-C’s larger Soft & Beautiful brand of relaxers and related products for children from 4 to 11 years old. …Just For Me Texture Softener, in this initial marketing phase, is going after parents of girls from multiethnic or biracial backgrounds–specifically, “white moms who have black daughters, blood related or adopted–which is an underserved market,” said a public relations rep for Soft & Beautiful at A-C’s agency M Strategies, Dallas, Texas.
    4a: Combo of tight coils and waves; Last relaxer - 11/05 (LC - 4/07) - /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2Fmissmonie%2F" class="Popup - updates as of Mar '09

    Products: Trader Joe's condish * Giovanni Direct Leave in * Fantasia Gel or KCCC for curl definition * Karen's Body Beautiful Hair Cream as moisturizer

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  • jathomas0910jathomas0910 Posts: 1Registered Users
    I have been natural for a little over a year now and my hair is so out of control, I have been following all the rules and using good products, women are always saying I have nice hair and it's now collar bone length and very thick...but it's getting more difficult to manage and just trying to manage it I break so much of so I was thinking about using a relaxer and I was in CVS and ran across the just for me texture softener...I have read a lot of good reviews, I really don’t want my hair straight but I do want to be able to comb through it without breakage or put it in a pony tail without it taking and hour so I can comb it in to place

    So giving my situation...should I go ahead and use this product?

    Thanks
  • msjaimmsjaim Posts: 948Registered Users
    its all about personal choice... just remember when/if u decide to stop using the relaxer, ull have to deal with the transitioning phase or big chop again.
  • LeeMayhemLeeMayhem Posts: 98Registered Users
    its basically a mild relaer, but i live and let live, so if others choose to use it, it's thier business......though in my opinion using it on a child that does not know/understand the concept of altering their hair texture with chemicals is......wrong
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  • TiggileneTiggilene Posts: 232Registered Users
    Texturizer = devil's mayonnaise.

    Jathomas0910, if your hair is breaking, I'm pretty sure weakening it further with a chemical 'softening' would only make things worse.

    Have you tried henna? I thought my hair HATED that stuff, but when I got the right brand (Jamila BAQ in the clear cello) and mixed it w. coconut milk, my hair came out great and a lot more manageable.

    IMHO, I'd try a few more options before adding chemicals.
  • Sandy CoilsSandy Coils Posts: 662Registered Users
    I say try henna. Henna has been a lifesaver for me. My hair is naturally tightly coiled. The henna has loosened my coil just enough for it to me a little easier to manage.

    I thought about a txt early in the game, but I'm so glad I didn't, because now when i see people that have them, their hair also begins to thin out and I just didn't want to have togo through the transition phase again, and after growing my hair out, I surely didn't want to have to BC again.
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  • jay76jay76 Posts: 67Registered Users
    I'm at Day 4 and still haven't done the final sulfate wash. I'm still trying to find a good conditioner and I'llhave to stop be Trader Joe's today after work.

    However, I was leaning real hard towards getting a texturizer just to make my hair manageable. But I really think I will do the Henna instead!

    Thanks!
    4b
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  • cayisha_azulcayisha_azul Posts: 234Registered Users
    The company is misleading and outright lying to consumers trying to coax loving parents into burning their childrens scalp and hair. It is not safe for children and the FDA should ban all kiddie relaxers, texturizers, texture softeners, whatever... They are all the same thing. Relaxers should have a suggested age like 12 or 13. Not that people will listen but some parents may pause before they do it. It should also be illiegal to relax children's hair in salons. I think that would cut down on the practice.
    Current Regimen: I am doing protective styles for the winter. Two Strand Twists and Twist Outs. Wet hair in the middle of winter is not cute.
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  • sobecurlsobecurl Posts: 313Registered Users
    This whole relaxer/texturizer/kiddie perm thing is so frustrating:banghead:.

    I think as parents, it is our responsibility to learn how to treat and take care of our little girls' hair. I saw a little girl in McDonald's yesterday who could have been no more than 2 years old with microbraids down to her ankles, and you could see that her edges were already broken off - at 2 YEARS OLD!!

    I understand it may be challenging as a caucasian mom with biracial children, but I would think you would educate yourself before you have kids to prepare for any type of hair. Not to mention there is so much information out there. If this mom is computer savy enough to have a blog, then she could easily do a google search on natural hair care for AA girls instead of running to a texturizer cuz her daughters hair is "different".

    Kudos to the mom of the Happy Girl Hair blog. Her daughters are adopted and she takes tremendous care of their hair in its natural state and does not rely on chemical short cuts. I wish more moms, both AA and non-AA moms, would follow her lead and allow our daughter to embrace the beauty of their natural texture. It sets up a vicious self-hating cycle for our little girls.
    Over 10 years natural and still growing...
  • AlexjoujouAlexjoujou Posts: 2,364Registered Users
    I think you are right with the marketing.

    When my daughter was 9 someone gave us one of these kits (Just for me) and told me it was a "texturizer" and would work well for my daughter's mixed hair. Her hair was short at the time and when it's short it is much curlier so looked closer to 3B mixed with some 4 type hair...it was a real mess as I had no idea how to care for this thick mane of hair that turned into dreadlocks at day 3 without combing. For years she endured every other day washes with combing it out that took over 2 hours. It got to the point she and I dreaded it so much but she really wanted long hair. We did this until I found this website this summer. 3 l-l-o-o-o-n-n-n-gg-g-g-g-g-g years. It was the primary problem between us since it was always traumatic and no one could help. I spent HUNDREDS on products for her hair.

    She's 12 now. She has multitextured hair (her dad is a type 4 but kinky not coily and very coarse and dry) which was so hard to take care of.

    At the time I didn't even know what a relaxer was...you might find this funny but I had no idea that all the straight hair I was seeing on so many black women was not their real hair. I mean I grew up with perms with rods as my mom's way to handle my hair once I was a teen (or when I was little she cut it short in a pixie cut) so I was familiar with the perm concept--changing the texture chemically of hair.

    Anyway I took one look at the ingredients and decided that there was no way I was going to put this on my kids head. Come to find out from my friend that her friend (who gave her this for me but whom I met only once or twice) was doing this to her daughter's hair since age 5...and doing it all the time (relaxer at the salon). To be blunt I was horrified. A 5 year old is just too young for this type of chemical. It's true my mom gave me perms when I was older (with rods to get it much more curly as it was easier to manage then my curls at the time which were all over the place wavy, ringlet's, and some coils but together I looked like a beach bum who hadn't washed for months) but I was like 13 the first one I got and I KNEW what it would do.

    It still just is so upseting to me to see that people would do this with their little child. I think 3C/4A/B hair on a child is so versatile if its well taken care of...the styles are fun and cute and gorgeous and they are so varied...much more variety IMHO than what I could do with my texture as a kid. Everything would fall out of my hair since it's so fine and the only thing I could use was rubber bands which would always have to be cut out. We did do braids for my daughter occasionally when she was younger and they were wicked cute--with beads on the ends. The main problem is that her mix of hair means they don't stay but for 3-4 days and it is a lot of work to do them so we stopped.

    We have a great routine now that is working so well. She's so happy with her hair and me too. After going on this board we know that whatever changes her hair goes through in the future we'll be ready for them and will know how to respond or where to get advice :lol:
    FIA 2c/3aFi

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  • lmackey0001lmackey0001 Posts: 13Registered Users
    I'm so happy to see so many of you ladies who agree with how totally wrong it is to put chemicals in a child's hair. My mother put a relaxer in my hair, but I was 13 years old and by the time I was 18 years old, I realized that this was not the way. I haven't put color or chemicals on my hair since and this site has been a GOD sent to my daughter and me. I would straighten my hair with a dryer and flat iron and rock the curls in the summer, but I've gone all the way curly now! I love my curls; I just never knew what to put on them and how to achieve the looks I want.
    My daughters hair is 3c and extremely, extremely thick. She has more hair than grown women!!!! And it is very difficult to untangle. It's not impossible, just difficult so if anyone has any advice, let me know! I will say that she does have her hair blowdryed no more than once a month. I two-strand twist her hair and she gets it cornrowed and it lasts longer and is easier to style once blown out. But, I have never, ever considered relaxing or putting any kind of chemical on her hair! And when she is older, I will discourage that as much as possible!!
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  • MslizziaMslizzia Posts: 600Registered Users
    It's definitely a relaxer. There's no doubt about that. I used to get texturizers before i found this site. It was good the first 2 times but it quickly started to become a pain because some of the texturizer got on the hair that was already texturized and it became straight hair.

    As you can imagine, that was not something that i was interested in doing because i would only do it every 3 months.
  • chandracimonechandracimone Posts: 4Registered Users
    I've had a texurizer, a relaxer, a texture softner and worn my hair natural. As a kid my mom started giving me a relaxer around 10 because my hair was too curly, long and thick for her to mess with. She didnt like the fact that she could straighten it and hours later when i played too hard it got back curly. At 16 I got rid of the relaxers and went back to natural. It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    The height in this is when you use a texture softener it doesn't stay in permanently. It's like a temporary fix or like a wash out dye that goes away after 30 washes. The more months go by that you haven't used it the more you hair goes back to normal to your new growth. Plus with this product you don't use it every month. Even when you open the box for Just for me it says that in print. IT loosens your curls but if you don't like the way it loosens give it about 3 months and a bunch of washes and your back to normal. That's the key difference from this and a relaxer. Once you relax your hair there is no going back, but to cut it out.

    it has an age limit because their are certain things that stunt growth in kids if you don't wait until their hair is at its full capacity instead of still metamorphosing. But honestly it's not about what you use on your hair. Your hair don't make the person. If you had none you would still be the same person on the inside and what you do with it ... is your own choice.

    More importantly whether black, white or purple .. none of us have the same type of hair if you are an american. You need to assess your hair on what you need because what works for others don't always work for you. For me .. I just hated getting relaxers because I can't get in the pool. A texturizer is permanent as hell but the upkeep on that for me ... too much but I could swim in the pool but not as often as I wanted to because it dried my hair. The Texture Softener .. I like because I can have looser curls one day and then go back to my tighter curls if I want to months later.I wash my hair everyday, but I moisturize it like nobody's business. I can spend 30 days in a pool underwater and my hair remains the same as the first day. I like it, and I'm 26 using it on and off for the last 3 years.

    there isn't too many products that don't uses chemicals of some sort withe mild or extreme. but if you have chemically treated hair by whatever you used or natural. "Carols Daughter" treats both. Not telling you what to do but sliding some more options to get whatever you're looking for. And like India Arie said ... I am not my hair .
  • EkaetteEkaette Posts: 356Registered Users
    It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. .

    Riiiiiiiiiiight. Same chemicals and also needs neutralizing shampoo to stop the chemical process and gets the hair too straight if left on too long. Sounds and acts just like a relaxer to me
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  • 3c4d7zwhatevs3c4d7zwhatevs Posts: 1,589Registered Users
    Why, exactly, is it so difficult to have curly hair? Sounds like chandracimone has the same brainwashing that many have who feel ike they just cannot deal with their own hair. If you learn how to, it can be done.

    Anyway, she misses the point about relaxers vs. texturizers and that the chemicals in those are made to make a permanent change to the hair, as opposed to those in conditioners, shampoos, etc. Everything is a chemical. So let's stop with the wordplay. As soon as two molecules of different elements of any kind combine a chemical reaction has occured. This thread is about chemicals combined to alter the texture of the hair.

    chandracimone, you can argue semantics and the difficulty of curly or biracial hair all you want - hair is just hair. And, once the chemicals in texturizer are applied a permanent change is made. The degree to which the hair is changed may vary depending on the strength of the chemicals, but the active ingredients are the same, it still needs to be neutralized, it still damges the hair to a degree, especially if overprocessed (why do you think you have to get "touch-ups" instead of doing the process again every so often?) and there is a reason it is not recommended for children. If you cannot do it to your children, the most vulnerable among us, why would you do it to yourself?
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  • BekkaPooBekkaPoo Posts: 3,861Registered Users
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fthenaturalhaven.blogspot.com%2F2010%2F04%2Fis-texturised-hair-similar-to-natural.html" class="Popup

    Q: Kelly who is texlaxed emailed me to ask, 'My hair for all intents and purposes is still curly. In fact if I do not apply gel to it, it is pretty hard to distinguish it from the natural hair which is not chemically treated. Should I treat my hair as natural?'

    A: No, texturised hair even if the look is natural is chemically treated. Applying a relaxer to hair, whether it is mild or for a shorter time still changes the structure of hair. Therefore your hair is not in a natural state and most likely is chemically damaged. You may therefore require additional specific care to mitigate this damage (see this post
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  • hippychichippychic Posts: 4,673Registered Users
    sagehen wrote: »
    Why, exactly, is it so difficult to have curly hair? Sounds like chandracimone has the same brainwashing that many have who feel ike they just cannot deal with their own hair. If you learn how to, it can be done.

    Anyway, she misses the point about relaxers vs. texturizers and that the chemicals in those are made to make a permanent change to the hair, as opposed to those in conditioners, shampoos, etc. Everything is a chemical. So let's stop with the wordplay. As soon as two molecules of different elements of any kind combine a chemical reaction has occured. This thread is about chemicals combined to alter the texture of the hair.

    chandracimone, you can argue semantics and the difficulty of curly or biracial hair all you want - hair is just hair. And, once the chemicals in texturizer are applied a permanent change is made. The degree to which the hair is changed may vary depending on the strength of the chemicals, but the active ingredients are the same, it still needs to be neutralized, it still damges the hair to a degree, especially if overprocessed (why do you think you have to get "touch-ups" instead of doing the process again every so often?) and there is a reason it is not recommended for children. If you cannot do it to your children, the most vulnerable among us, why would you do it to yourself?
    +1
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  • sobecurlsobecurl Posts: 313Registered Users
    It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    I REALLY hate this whole "black hair/white hair" thing. Haven't we educated ourselves enough to know that both black people and white people come in many shades and hair textures. There is no such thing as "biracial hair". The laws of genetics do not say that when a black person and white person procreate their child will automatically have 3b/c hair.

    If you choose to texturize to make handling YOUR hair easier for YOU then own it, but don't blame it on the fact that you have "bi-racial hair" and it is more difficult than "black hair" or "white hair".

    There is too much information on this site and many other hair boards to learn how to deal with various curly textures and if chemically processing your hair is how you choose to care for your hair then you have to do what is best for you, but PLEASE stop perpetuating these racial stereotypes of what is one race or another.

    It is 2010 People....2010. Let's learn a little something already.

    Sorry...maybe this is better suited for the "Say it I dare you" thread, but I've seen too many racially divisive threads on this board lately and it is quite disappointing.
    Over 10 years natural and still growing...
  • sobecurlsobecurl Posts: 313Registered Users
    I've had a texurizer, a relaxer, a texture softner and worn my hair natural. As a kid my mom started giving me a relaxer around 10 because my hair was too curly, long and thick for her to mess with. She didnt like the fact that she could straighten it and hours later when i played too hard it got back curly. At 16 I got rid of the relaxers and went back to natural. It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    The height in this is when you use a texture softener it doesn't stay in permanently. It's like a temporary fix or like a wash out dye that goes away after 30 washes. The more months go by that you haven't used it the more you hair goes back to normal to your new growth. Plus with this product you don't use it every month. Even when you open the box for Just for me it says that in print. IT loosens your curls but if you don't like the way it loosens give it about 3 months and a bunch of washes and your back to normal. That's the key difference from this and a relaxer. Once you relax your hair there is no going back, but to cut it out.

    it has an age limit because their are certain things that stunt growth in kids if you don't wait until their hair is at its full capacity instead of still metamorphosing. But honestly it's not about what you use on your hair. Your hair don't make the person. If you had none you would still be the same person on the inside and what you do with it ... is your own choice.

    More importantly whether black, white or purple .. none of us have the same type of hair if you are an american. You need to assess your hair on what you need because what works for others don't always work for you. For me .. I just hated getting relaxers because I can't get in the pool. A texturizer is permanent as hell but the upkeep on that for me ... too much but I could swim in the pool but not as often as I wanted to because it dried my hair. The Texture Softener .. I like because I can have looser curls one day and then go back to my tighter curls if I want to months later.I wash my hair everyday, but I moisturize it like nobody's business. I can spend 30 days in a pool underwater and my hair remains the same as the first day. I like it, and I'm 26 using it on and off for the last 3 years.

    there isn't too many products that don't uses chemicals of some sort withe mild or extreme. but if you have chemically treated hair by whatever you used or natural. "Carols Daughter" treats both. Not telling you what to do but sliding some more options to get whatever you're looking for. And like India Arie said ... I am not my hair .

    OK...Biochemist stepping back in here. The only difference between a relaxer and a texture softener is the method of application. A relaxer is left on longer to take the hair to straightness while a texturizer/softer is left on for a shorter period to only loosen the curl. Sodium hydroxide, guanidine hydroxide, lithium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide...all the same thing. All from the same metal hydroxide family and all meant to do the same thing...destroy chemical bonds.

    You cannot "wash out" a relaxer/texturizer. It is NOT like a semi-permanent color, and your hair cannot return to it original state. When you burn something on the stove, you can't put it in the fridge and have it return to it's pre-burnt state. That is all the laws of chemical change. If your hair returned to it's pre-relaxed state it may be because your hair has low porosity and is more resistant to chemical manipulation in the first place. But trust me, I have had a texturizer/softer and there is no returning to original state after a number of washes.

    The reason why relaxers have an age limit is because the manufacturers are trying to cover their a$$ from lawsuits. It has nothing to do with stunted growth. And you are right to say "that is how consumerism works" because your have fed into all the marketing ploys in thinking that the texturizer/softener you get is any different to the boxed relaxers that sit on the shelf in Walgreens.
    Over 10 years natural and still growing...
  • hippychichippychic Posts: 4,673Registered Users
    sobecurl wrote: »
    I've had a texurizer, a relaxer, a texture softner and worn my hair natural. As a kid my mom started giving me a relaxer around 10 because my hair was too curly, long and thick for her to mess with. She didnt like the fact that she could straighten it and hours later when i played too hard it got back curly. At 16 I got rid of the relaxers and went back to natural. It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    The height in this is when you use a texture softener it doesn't stay in permanently. It's like a temporary fix or like a wash out dye that goes away after 30 washes. The more months go by that you haven't used it the more you hair goes back to normal to your new growth. Plus with this product you don't use it every month. Even when you open the box for Just for me it says that in print. IT loosens your curls but if you don't like the way it loosens give it about 3 months and a bunch of washes and your back to normal. That's the key difference from this and a relaxer. Once you relax your hair there is no going back, but to cut it out.

    it has an age limit because their are certain things that stunt growth in kids if you don't wait until their hair is at its full capacity instead of still metamorphosing. But honestly it's not about what you use on your hair. Your hair don't make the person. If you had none you would still be the same person on the inside and what you do with it ... is your own choice.

    More importantly whether black, white or purple .. none of us have the same type of hair if you are an american. You need to assess your hair on what you need because what works for others don't always work for you. For me .. I just hated getting relaxers because I can't get in the pool. A texturizer is permanent as hell but the upkeep on that for me ... too much but I could swim in the pool but not as often as I wanted to because it dried my hair. The Texture Softener .. I like because I can have looser curls one day and then go back to my tighter curls if I want to months later.I wash my hair everyday, but I moisturize it like nobody's business. I can spend 30 days in a pool underwater and my hair remains the same as the first day. I like it, and I'm 26 using it on and off for the last 3 years.

    there isn't too many products that don't uses chemicals of some sort withe mild or extreme. but if you have chemically treated hair by whatever you used or natural. "Carols Daughter" treats both. Not telling you what to do but sliding some more options to get whatever you're looking for. And like India Arie said ... I am not my hair .

    OK...Biochemist stepping back in here. The only difference between a relaxer and a texture softener is the method of application. A relaxer is left on longer to take the hair to straightness while a texturizer/softer is left on for a shorter period to only loosen the curl. Sodium hydroxide, guanidine hydroxide, lithium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide...all the same thing. All from the same metal hydroxide family and all meant to do the same thing...destroy chemical bonds.

    You cannot "wash out" a relaxer/texturizer. It is NOT like a semi-permanent color, and your hair cannot return to it original state. When you burn something on the stove, you can't put it in the fridge and have it return to it's pre-burnt state. That is all the laws of chemical change. If your hair returned to it's pre-relaxed state it may be because your hair has low porosity and is more resistant to chemical manipulation in the first place. But trust me, I have had a texturizer/softer and there is no returning to original state after a number of washes.

    The reason why relaxers have an age limit is because the manufacturers are trying to cover their a$$ from lawsuits. It has nothing to do with stunted growth. And you are right to say "that is how consumerism works" because your have fed into all the marketing ploys in thinking that the texturizer/softener you get is any different to the boxed relaxers that sit on the shelf in Walgreens.
    thank you sobecurl!
    it can't get any more plain:toothy2:
    LOIS (OS); cottony, TYPE 4 hair, fine/med strands; no cones bcz my hair hates them; last relaxer '98; now low porosity:?, ignores most natural hair rules; BC #8

    faves: suave, v05 shampoo, conditioner (my own), raw shea butter, castor oil, peanut oil, aloe juice
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • QVCDivaQVCDiva Posts: 1,329Registered Users
    sobecurl wrote: »
    I've had a texurizer, a relaxer, a texture softner and worn my hair natural. As a kid my mom started giving me a relaxer around 10 because my hair was too curly, long and thick for her to mess with. She didnt like the fact that she could straighten it and hours later when i played too hard it got back curly. At 16 I got rid of the relaxers and went back to natural. It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    The height in this is when you use a texture softener it doesn't stay in permanently. It's like a temporary fix or like a wash out dye that goes away after 30 washes. The more months go by that you haven't used it the more you hair goes back to normal to your new growth. Plus with this product you don't use it every month. Even when you open the box for Just for me it says that in print. IT loosens your curls but if you don't like the way it loosens give it about 3 months and a bunch of washes and your back to normal. That's the key difference from this and a relaxer. Once you relax your hair there is no going back, but to cut it out.

    it has an age limit because their are certain things that stunt growth in kids if you don't wait until their hair is at its full capacity instead of still metamorphosing. But honestly it's not about what you use on your hair. Your hair don't make the person. If you had none you would still be the same person on the inside and what you do with it ... is your own choice.

    More importantly whether black, white or purple .. none of us have the same type of hair if you are an american. You need to assess your hair on what you need because what works for others don't always work for you. For me .. I just hated getting relaxers because I can't get in the pool. A texturizer is permanent as hell but the upkeep on that for me ... too much but I could swim in the pool but not as often as I wanted to because it dried my hair. The Texture Softener .. I like because I can have looser curls one day and then go back to my tighter curls if I want to months later.I wash my hair everyday, but I moisturize it like nobody's business. I can spend 30 days in a pool underwater and my hair remains the same as the first day. I like it, and I'm 26 using it on and off for the last 3 years.

    there isn't too many products that don't uses chemicals of some sort withe mild or extreme. but if you have chemically treated hair by whatever you used or natural. "Carols Daughter" treats both. Not telling you what to do but sliding some more options to get whatever you're looking for. And like India Arie said ... I am not my hair .

    OK...Biochemist stepping back in here. The only difference between a relaxer and a texture softener is the method of application. A relaxer is left on longer to take the hair to straightness while a texturizer/softer is left on for a shorter period to only loosen the curl. Sodium hydroxide, guanidine hydroxide, lithium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide...all the same thing. All from the same metal hydroxide family and all meant to do the same thing...destroy chemical bonds.

    You cannot "wash out" a relaxer/texturizer. It is NOT like a semi-permanent color, and your hair cannot return to it original state. When you burn something on the stove, you can't put it in the fridge and have it return to it's pre-burnt state. That is all the laws of chemical change. If your hair returned to it's pre-relaxed state it may be because your hair has low porosity and is more resistant to chemical manipulation in the first place. But trust me, I have had a texturizer/softer and there is no returning to original state after a number of washes.

    The reason why relaxers have an age limit is because the manufacturers are trying to cover their a$$ from lawsuits. It has nothing to do with stunted growth. And you are right to say "that is how consumerism works" because your have fed into all the marketing ploys in thinking that the texturizer/softener you get is any different to the boxed relaxers that sit on the shelf in Walgreens.

    From a fellow chemist, thanks for posting this so I didn't have to. :)
    Last Relaxer: 09/19/08
    BC: 01/30/09
    Misc: 1st time going natural was '94-'98; 2nd time - '99-2003; This time I will not go back to relaxers.
    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fpublic.fotki.com%2FQVCDiva%2F" class="Popup
  • aubinaubin Posts: 286Registered Users
    sobecurl wrote: »
    It was not an easy transition because you hair gets used to it being treated a certain way and if your hair is like mine ... after a while it starts to reject what used to be the bomb bigity for it. even if you have multiracial hair, That hair is more difficult than if it was african or european. With multiracial you pray that it was either black or white because everyone knows how to deal with that better.
    Curly hair in general is difficult.

    the Texture softener does exactly what it says ... It softens hair. Yeah it's marketed for biracial kids but the product is for anyone who wants to keep their hair but make it softer. It isn't a relaxer although they do share the same chemical. everything you buy at the store including conditioners have chemicals if you read the back of the product and read that long list of ingredients. That's just the way of the world of hair consumerism works.

    I REALLY hate this whole "black hair/white hair" thing. Haven't we educated ourselves enough to know that both black people and white people come in many shades and hair textures. There is no such thing as "biracial hair". The laws of genetics do not say that when a black person and white person procreate their child will automatically have 3b/c hair.

    If you choose to texturize to make handling YOUR hair easier for YOU then own it, but don't blame it on the fact that you have "bi-racial hair" and it is more difficult than "black hair" or "white hair".

    +1!!!!!!!
    (from a 3C/4a black curly who has a 3C black mom, 3B black sister, 3B black cousin...and none of us is biracial!)
    3c/4a OS curls
    Poo: Mehandi Zizyphus Spina Christi and Juniper Shampoo Bar
    Co-wash/Detangler/Leave-in: V05, Giovanni SAS, Tresemme Naturals, Suave Naturals, GVP Conditioning Balm, Aussie Moist
    DC: henna, AOHR, AOWC, Yes to Carrots, DevaOne
    Sealing: cocoa butter
    :clock:Natural since 1990, BC #3 September 2008:clock:
  • Sandy CoilsSandy Coils Posts: 662Registered Users
    sobecurl wrote: »

    There is too much information on this site and many other hair boards to learn how to deal with various curly textures and if chemically processing your hair is how you choose to care for your hair then you have to do what is best for you, but PLEASE stop perpetuating these racial stereotypes of what is one race or another.

    It is 2010 People....2010. Let's learn a little something already.


    Amen!!!!


    I have to keep it real though, I fell into the trap of relaxers and I relaxed my daughter's hair when she was about 6 because she had soooooo much hair and I didn't know how to handle it other than to relax it so that it didn't take me 4 hours to do her hair.

    Well fast forward 2 years and numerous hours of reading & research and here I am. She has been relaxer free * post BC* (at her request) for almost a year now and she transitioned for a little over a year. Thank goodness for all of the natural hair sites and information I "lucked" up on.

    I think a lot of moms just don't know what to do. We get into the habits and routines of what out mothers and grandmothers did and never give it a second thought until something goes wrong.

    Maybe we should try to come up with a way to "school" new moms about the benefits of natural hair? :dontknow:
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