Question For You Nurses Out There

SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
It was always a toss-up when I went to college, nursing or court reporting. I chose court reporting. But now with my daughter out of the house and worrying about my hands, I'm thinking of going to nursing school.

Having said that, it won't be easy. I'll have to do a weekend nursing program and still work full time.

Here are my two main concerns that I hope you can help me with directly:

1. It's an Associate's degree program. Is there a difference regarding pay, respect, etc., with an R.N. that has her Associates versus the R.N. that has her Bachelor's?

2. The one college that does weekend nursing around here is affiliated with a hospital. I can only transfer SIX credits to the college from another college. All other credits must be taken at this particular college. If I choose not to do that, I get an R.N. from the hospital but then I don't even get an Associate's.

So the question, again, is essentially the same for both programs. Less money? Less respect by fellow nurses, etc.
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Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



Comments

  • goldygoldy Posts: 5,463Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Springcurl wrote:
    1. It's an Associate's degree program. Is there a difference regarding pay, respect, etc., with an R.N. that has her Associates versus the R.N. that has her Bachelor's?

    i'm pretty sure that in Boston there is a pay difference between ADNs and BSNs (Associate Degree Nurses and Bachelor Degree Nurses). however, i'm not sure how great it is. where i am they do not have a pay difference, but they have a clinical ladder (which helps with bonuses) and having a BSN gives you points to climb the ladder.. as far as respect goes, it is probably dependent on the area where you practice (including geographic and unit of hospital).. there are hospitals which do not staff ADNs in specialty care, critical care units, emergency departments, and ORs..
    Springcurl wrote:
    2. The one college that does weekend nursing around here is affiliated with a hospital. I can only transfer SIX credits to the college from another college. All other credits must be taken at this particular college. If I choose not to do that, I get an R.N. from the hospital but then I don't even get an Associate's.

    i'm confused by the RN but not an ADN.. are you sure it is not an LPN program (licensed practical nurse) as opposed to a RN (registered nurse) program? it sounds like a diploma-nurse program which i had thought programs no longer exist for.. have you checked into the community college in your area regarding nursing programs they offer?

    if my answers don't make sense, ask me and i'll try to clarify :)
    Poodlehead wrote:
    Ah, it all makes sense now. Goldy is the puppet master! :lol:
  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    goldy wrote:
    i'm confused by the RN but not an ADN.. are you sure it is not an LPN program (licensed practical nurse) as opposed to a RN (registered nurse) program? it sounds like a diploma-nurse program which i had thought programs no longer exist for.. have you checked into the community college in your area regarding nursing programs they offer?

    if my answers don't make sense, ask me and i'll try to clarify :)

    Thanks for answering! I probably didn't make myself very clear. The nursing program is Brockton Hospital in association with Fisher College. If you take all the pre-recs at Fisher College, you get an Associate's Degree through Fisher College. If you just use transfer credits, you still get your R.N., but it's only through Brockton Hospital. (I'm pretty sure that's how I read it.) It's definitely not an LPN program.

    I did think about LPN as a jump-in point and then going to school for RN, but the pay is really low... I'd be taking a huge pay cut and I can't swing that.

    ETA: There's lots of great nursing program around here at the community colleges, but I really need a weekend program. I work mid-shift, so neither morning nor night school works for me. The only other community college that does that is Bunker Hill Community College (which I call Bunker Hell). I took some nursing pre-recs there a few years ago and the administration is HELL... long lines for hours and hours. The community college that I went to for court reporting wasn't like that at all.
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    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I'm an RN without an ADN. I went to a diploma program through a hospital. It's defunct now, but I think a few such programs still exist, not sure where. There is no difference between an ADN and a non-ADN RN in terms of pay or opportunity. There are some differences with BSN's though. BSN's have more opportunity for management and, as goldy mentioned, some hospitals restrict specialty/critical care units to BSN's only. Some hospitals pay more for staff nurse BSN's, some don't. Other than that, there is very little difference from one basic staff nurse to another, in pay or knowledge. I've met a lot of LPN's that were highly knowledgable too. The skills mostly come on-the-job.
  • curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    1. It's an Associate's degree program. Is there a difference regarding pay, respect, etc., with an R.N. that has her Associates versus the R.N. that has her Bachelor's?

    2. The one college that does weekend nursing around here is affiliated with a hospital. I can only transfer SIX credits to the college from another college. All other credits must be taken at this particular college. If I choose not to do that, I get an R.N. from the hospital but then I don't even get an Associate's.

    So the question, again, is essentially the same for both programs. Less money? Less respect by fellow nurses, etc.

    1. How much money you are paid depends on where you are geographically located and the organization you are employed with.

    2. You can become a registered nurse in 3 ways: diploma program, associates degree program, and bachelor's degree program. There are very few diploma programs left. There is one here in my city and 1-2 out there in the northeastern US....I know there cannot be more than 5 left in the country. The one you speak of that is associated with the hospital sounds like a diploma program. Diploma program is the lowest level; bachelor's degree program is the highest level. I personally prefer all RNs to have bachelor's degrees. My mom is an RN and has an associates degree, but she is working on her bachelor's. I just feel like it strengthens the profession. However, I do not respect a good diploma registered nurse or a good associates degree registered nurse any less than a good bachelor's degree registered nurse. As long as you know what you're doing and aren't a sty, no worries. :)

    In the industry I work in, all of the RNs on my staff started at the same salary, but not all of them have bachelor's degrees. There are 5 of them, and one has an associates degree in nursing.

    The important thing is getting licensed....you don't officially get to use RN behind your name until you write and pass your state board exam.

    Good luck!

    "In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

    4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Diploma program is the lowest level;


    I disagree with that statement. I've never seen anything anywhere that ranks diploma RN's beneath ASN RN's. The RN license is just as valid. I see ASN's and diploma RN's as equivalent, and the RN-to-BSN programs seem to accept diploma RN's just as readily as ASN RN's. True most diploma hospital-based programs have closed or converted to community college programs, but that doesn't lower the level of the diploma RN's who have already attended. The old diploma programs actually took longer than ASN programs and were more clinically intense.
  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    Thanks for all this info, you guys!

    My next step will be to call Brockton Hospital and Fisher College and talk to their admissions people.

    The other thing I COULD do if I really had to is get my LPN, work full time as an LPN and part time as a stenographer to make comparable pay, then (somewhow) find the time to got to school in the program that accelerates LPNs into RNs. That's a last resort.
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    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Diploma program is the lowest level;


    I disagree with that statement. I've never seen anything anywhere that ranks diploma RN's beneath ASN RN's. The RN license is just as valid. I see ASN's and diploma RN's as equivalent, and the RN-to-BSN programs seem to accept diploma RN's just as readily as ASN RN's. True most diploma hospital-based programs have closed or converted to community college programs, but that doesn't lower the level of the diploma RN's who have already attended. The old diploma programs actually took longer than ASN programs and were more clinically intense.

    I agree with the bolded; that is what I said. To clarify, as far as formal education goes, the diploma program is generally the lowest level. I'm not knocking clinically intense programs at all; excellent clinical nurses come out of clinically intense programs, but nurses don't solely work at the bedside. I think there should be a balance of the practical and the academic because when there is a balance, the graduate has many more options. ASNs and diploma program nurses usually do not have as easy access to some of those opportunities that BSN prepared nurses do due to less formal education (especially today, when the 4 year degree is the new high school diploma, eh). Of course, there are always outliers.

    BSN vs ASN/diploma is just a case of tortoise and hare to me....we both get to the same destinations eventually. BSN track is slow and steady; ASN/diploma track is fast as all get out. Sure, new ASN/diploma RNs can run circles around most new BSN RNs...but eventually the gap narrows and BSN nurses catch up clinically and often pass ASN/diploma RNs in the profession.

    I would go the ASN/diploma track if I wanted to get a license fast and needed money fast or if it was a second career. I would go the BSN track if it was a first career and if I had a bit more time to have everything consolidate before I go out and practice.

    And I forgot one new route; you can become an RN by obtaining an MSN now, also. Here's a link to the department of labor. Lots of info on registered nurses and pay. http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos083.htm#training

    "In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

    4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
  • goldygoldy Posts: 5,463Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Springcurl wrote:
    My next step will be to call Brockton Hospital and Fisher College and talk to their admissions people.

    The other thing I COULD do if I really had to is get my LPN, work full time as an LPN and part time as a stenographer to make comparable pay, then (somewhow) find the time to got to school in the program that accelerates LPNs into RNs. That's a last resort.

    i would call the nursing school and find out if they have a orientation or Q&A session for potential nursing students.. you need to find out what type of wait list there is to get into the program (many schools have a wait list after you complete pre-reqs -- or they will usually require a very high gpa for consideration and then accept a minimum number of students).. my husband applied for a wait list program and a program that limited acceptance.. he ended up being accepted into the wait list program but had to wait a year to start nursing classes..
    some students in that program go into LPN school during their waiting year.. many LPN-RN bridge programs are online..

    have you checked out www.allnursingschools.com ? you can search nursing schools by degree and major.. also you may want to check out a forum called www.allnurses.com , and go into the Mass. section.. you may learn a lot about the schools you are considering..
    Poodlehead wrote:
    Ah, it all makes sense now. Goldy is the puppet master! :lol:
  • sariroosariroo Posts: 1,958Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Springcurl - just wanted to pop in and wish you luck in your decision. I don't have much input because my school choices were pretty limited as I wanted to start at a certain time and be done within a certain time and only one program fit my schedule.

    I did the same - changed my career path and went back to school for nursing. I'm so happy right now. I'm still finishing my program. Right now I'm doing my practicum/preceptorship in the hospital with a nurse and it is great! I love the floor I'm on, the patients and I have learned the ropes pretty quickly. I still know nothing but I learn everyday and find myself growing in ways I never thought possible. Nursing is tough but rewarding at the same time!
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