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stay at home moms and social security benefits.....

fraufrau Posts: 6,130Registered Users Curl Neophyte
for those that have remained out of the workforce, do they get social security benefits?

how will moms who stay at home secure their future if they don't return to work?
is it a cross your finger deal in hopes that the husband will never leave and do right by them and their children?

can you only be recognized as a stay at home mom if you're married?
i mean, if you're single does it count?
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Comments

  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    SAHM don't get SS.

    There are some groups that are trying to get homemakers SS benefits.
    3c/4a
  • fraufrau Posts: 6,130Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    so....omg, if you're husband leaves and you've given part of your life to support him and raise healthy children, then you might be given the shaft!

    imagine trying to enter the workforce after years of staying at home?
    you're at such a disadvantage.

    i'm not suggesting working under the assumption your husband might leave you....i'm just saying that it's scary risk a woman must take.
  • YolyCYolyC Posts: 3,758Registered Users
    I thoiught they got a small check. Not as much as someone who hhsa earned all their work credits but still something.
    Location: Chicago

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "If you don't stand for something you will fall for anything."
    Malcolm X
  • PoodleheadPoodlehead Posts: 6,959Registered Users
    frau wrote:
    so....omg, if you're husband leaves and you've given part of your life to support him and raise healthy children, then you might be given the shaft!

    imagine trying to enter the workforce after years of staying at home?
    you're at such a disadvantage.

    i'm not suggesting working under the assumption your husband might leave you....i'm just saying that it's scary risk a woman must take.

    Yup. I know countless women who are working as waitresses because it was the only work they could find after their marriages ended.
    Minneapolis, MN
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    My mom was a SAHM and she gets social security under my dad's SS#. He's deceased, but even if he wasn't, she would get it that way. If you get divorced, I believe you get credit for your husband up to that point then must earn your own benefits.

    You pay into your own SS account. It's not like it's free money or anything. This is why retirement funds are community property and are usually split if there's a divorce.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • gggg Posts: 1,865Registered Users
    Can we say prenup? Yeah it doesn't sound romantic but you really don't know what might happen and you must protect yourself financially. Before you even get yourself in that situation think about what could happen. What if the husband dies or runs off?

    Heck you can start your own business from home, take correspondence classes. Do anything so that you're not faced with a situation where you end up destitute because you've solely relied on someone else for support.
    You don't have to blow out my flame to make yours burn brighter.

    When you judge another, you do not define them, you define yourself.

    How people treat you is their karma; how you react is yours.
  • CGECGE Posts: 1,911Registered Users
    frau wrote:
    for those that have remained out of the workforce, do they get social security benefits?

    how will moms who stay at home secure their future if they don't return to work?
    is it a cross your finger deal in hopes that the husband will never leave and do right by them and their children?

    can you only be recognized as a stay at home mom if you're married?
    i mean, if you're single does it count?

    I'm not sure I understand the question.

    Why would they receive money/benefits when they haven't been paying into it?
    I used to have a signature but it disappeared and I just couldn't be bothered writing another so please feel free to ingore this.
  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    mrspoppers wrote:
    My mom was a SAHM and she gets social security under my dad's SS#. He's deceased, but even if he wasn't, she would get it that way. If you get divorced, I believe you get credit for your husband up to that point then must earn your own benefits.

    You pay into your own SS account. It's not like it's free money or anything. This is why retirement funds are community property and are usually split if there's a divorce.

    Let me rephrase. :laughing9:

    SAHPs get benefits calculated from their spouses earnings (it's like 1/2 or something, right?), not from any work that they do themselves.
    3c/4a
  • JosephineJosephine Posts: 14,177Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    frau wrote:
    so....omg, if you're husband leaves and you've given part of your life to support him and raise healthy children, then you might be given the shaft!

    imagine trying to enter the workforce after years of staying at home?
    you're at such a disadvantage.

    i'm not suggesting working under the assumption your husband might leave you....i'm just saying that it's scary risk a woman must take.

    That's why there's alimony and why I would never be a stay at home mom.
  • MarMar Posts: 3,003Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I am completely comfortable being a SAHM and am not worried at all about SS
    "what's so funny 'bout peace, love and understanding?"



    "If you judge people,you have no time to love them"
    -Mother Theresa
  • fraufrau Posts: 6,130Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    :pale:
  • PartyHairPartyHair Posts: 7,713Registered Users
    Mar wrote:
    I am completely comfortable being a SAHM and am not worried at all about SS

    Right. If we had kids and we could swing it financially I'd have no qualms at all about being a stay at home mom.
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Rock on with your bad self.

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Be excellent to each other. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
  • CGECGE Posts: 1,911Registered Users
    PartyHair wrote:
    Mar wrote:
    I am completely comfortable being a SAHM and am not worried at all about SS

    Right. If we had kids and we could swing it financially I'd have no qualms at all about being a stay at home mom.

    Me, too.
    I used to have a signature but it disappeared and I just couldn't be bothered writing another so please feel free to ingore this.
  • Oregano  (formerly babywavy)Oregano (formerly babywavy) Posts: 5,297Registered Users
    There's definitely a lot of trust involved.
    ~ the artist formerly known as babywavy ~

    Please excuse any typos. For the time being, we are blaming it on my computer.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    My social security will be based on my husband's earnings. If he dies or runs off with a hussy, I can still claim against his SS earnings. I also have a claim against his individual retirement accounts and pensions. They are marital property.

    I got a substantial sum from my ex-husband's pension when he took early retirement from his corporate job. He didn't like it, but I was entitled to it anyway. I got half of his pension for the years we were married. An actuary lawyer had to do the calculations to figure out how much that was.
  • KurlyKarenLeeKurlyKarenLee Posts: 1,048Registered Users
    frau wrote:
    for those that have remained out of the workforce, do they get social security benefits?

    how will moms who stay at home secure their future if they don't return to work?
    is it a cross your finger deal in hopes that the husband will never leave and do right by them and their children?

    can you only be recognized as a stay at home mom if you're married?
    i mean, if you're single does it count?

    OK, this is long so get your :happy1: :

    You pay into SS with every paycheck you earn (unless you are contract labor and they don't withhold --in that case you pay self-employment taxes and SS yourself with your quarterly tax estimates) . At some point in time, Uncle Sam starts sending you a "Social Security Statement" every year that tells you what you have put aside for EVERY YEAR you have worked and your estimated benefits if and when you retire. Retirement benefits are more if you retire after age 70 than at retirement age (66 and 10 months). THIS IS IMPORTANT ---THE MORE YOU PAY IN, THE MORE YOU GET WHEN YOU RETIRE. For the years you don't work, you get a big fat ZERO. I can look at my statement and identify the exact times that I did not work and that was an awakening for me and one of the reasons I got a paying job!!! Don't get me wrong --I truly believe working moms work and would not ever trade the years I spent at home with my kids --but there's a security factor there. If you don't have a husband who has a good job and good retirement, you need to start thinking about this kind of thing sooner than later. Women outlive men by what ....7 years or so.... so your money's got to last longer than your life or your husband's retirement.

    After you are married ten years, if your husband dies you are entitled to a survivor's PORTION of your husband's retirement (or wife's if you are a man). In a divorce situation --depending on what state you're in-- you could be entitled to receive a portion of your spouse's SS Benefits; however, I have been a family law paralegal in Texas for 12 years and have never seen this happen. (Not to say that it DOESN'T happen --I've just never SEEN it happen. In other words, it's not a common thing.) I am talking about SS Benefits here --not pension or private retirement plans. The division of those plans (due to death or divorce) depend on what state you're in. Only 8 states have community property laws --so check with an attorney in YOUR OWN STATE.

    If you become disabled and cannot work, you can apply for SS Disability. There's also SSI disability but I really don't know the difference --I'm not involved in that part of the legal system. They consider SS and SSI Disability on a case by case situation depending on your education, your ability to rehabilitate, and the overall seriousness of your disability. For example, if you are highly educated and could possibly do something from a wheelchair, you'd be less likely to qualify that someone who is not educated and becomes disabled.

    Unfortunately, there are no guarantees for your future, dear. You are responsible for putting aside for your retirement --married or not! HTH!
    KurlyKarenLee

    You can say what you want about the South, but you never hear of anyone retiring and moving North.
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users Curl Neophyte
    Great post KKL! :icon_smile:
    0004.gif

    Ever since the sports thread wars I have sensed a special connection between [edit] & Wile. Like the connection oil has to water. I almost can't speak of it. Wait....my eyes are misting. ~asq
    Let’s just stay together and tell the world to kiss our ass. ~P


  • nextmovenextmove Posts: 686Registered Users
    Frau does your mother live in a common law state? If she does and your parents are still together, she may be able to get some benefits based on what people in the thread are saying.

    She should definitely consult a professional before it's too late.
  • CherishCherish Posts: 1,847Registered Users
    I agree with gg about the prenup, and besides, the SAHP should be keeping an eye on their spouse's 401K and not so much SS - I keep reading that SS isn't worth counting on... Frau does your Dad have a 401k?
  • munchkinmunchkin Posts: 2,909Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.
    3b/c
  • YolyCYolyC Posts: 3,758Registered Users
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.


    Well that really Sucks :angryfire:
    Location: Chicago

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "If you don't stand for something you will fall for anything."
    Malcolm X
  • JosephineJosephine Posts: 14,177Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    YolyC wrote:
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.


    Well that really Sucks :angryfire:

    Hehe not really. Many women that never worked will have more money that women who do work by marrying rich/richer.
  • cymprenicympreni Posts: 9,609Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.

    My MIL lives off her ex's SS, its not very much though. But he never had to pay alimony or child support and left her with absolutely nothing but clothes and the kids, so I guess it evens out.
  • MarMar Posts: 3,003Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    babywavy wrote:
    There's definitely a lot of trust involved.

    Yup-and we got it.
    It's got a lot to do wth why we've been married 23 years :)
    "what's so funny 'bout peace, love and understanding?"



    "If you judge people,you have no time to love them"
    -Mother Theresa
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.

    SAHMs do work, just not necessarily outside the home. They work their tails off most of the time! And in your SIL's case, her being a SAHM likely contributes to her husband being able to make very good money and do his job. What more important work is there than raising children? I think she is entitled to every penny. (And I am speaking as someone who does not see myself being a SAHM long-term, beyond my maternity year.)
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


    .png


    534Pm5.png





  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.


    I find it fair, and family friendly. The USA is often criticized for not being family friendly for not mandating long paid maternity leaves, but there are some things it does that are family friendly that people forget about. The social security system and the federal tax laws were set up originally to favor families where one parent stays home. I don't see anything wrong with that. It's good for kids to grow up with a dedicated at-home parent and that parent shouldn't be penalized for it with taxes or later on in retirement.
  • JosephineJosephine Posts: 14,177Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    munchkin wrote:
    They get a SS check based on their husband's salary. In some cases it can be pretty darn good. I have a SIL who has always been a SAHM. Her husband made very good money and is receiving probably the max or close to it in SS. Her SS check is based somehow on a percentage of his. In her case, it is higher than many women (people) who have worked all their lives. That I don't really find fair. I do believe they should get a survivor's benefit, but with a system that is hurting for money her receiving more than some of you working women is just not right. In her case it is just "her fun spending" money. If her husband was not still living, I would consider it OK, but he is very much alive.


    I find it fair, and family friendly. The USA is often criticized for not being family friendly for not mandating long paid maternity leaves, but there are some things it does that are family friendly that people forget about. The social security system and the federal tax laws were set up originally to favor families where one parent stays home. I don't see anything wrong with that. It's good for kids to grow up with a dedicated at-home parent and that parent shouldn't be penalized for it with taxes or later on in retirement.

    I agree.
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    "Social Security Act
    An act to provide for the general welfare by establishing a system of Federal old-age benefits, and by enabling the several States to make more adequate provision for aged persons, blind persons, dependent and crippled children, maternal and child welfare, public health, and the administration of their unemployment compensation laws; to establish a Social Security Board; to raise revenue; and for other purposes, August 14, 1935; Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789-; General Records of the United States"

    Trust is all well and good, but blind trust isn't. SAHM's should know the ins and outs of their family's finances, including their husbands earnings and benefits. It's also probably smart for them to have a bank account or credit card in their own name. Having an established credit/financial history of one's own is important.

    Blind trust and lack of a personal or recent financial history is why many women have wound up having trouble even renting an apartment if their marriage doesn't work out for some reason.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Discgirl wrote:
    "Social Security Act
    An act to provide for the general welfare by establishing a system of Federal old-age benefits, and by enabling the several States to make more adequate provision for aged persons, blind persons, dependent and crippled children, maternal and child welfare, public health, and the administration of their unemployment compensation laws; to establish a Social Security Board; to raise revenue; and for other purposes, August 14, 1935; Enrolled Acts and Resolutions of Congress, 1789-; General Records of the United States"

    Trust is all well and good, but blind trust isn't. SAHM's should know the ins and outs of their family's finances, including their husbands earnings and benefits. It's also probably smart for them to have a bank account or credit card in their own name. Having an established credit/financial history of one's own is important.

    Blind trust and lack of a personal or recent financial history is why many women have wound up having trouble even renting an apartment if their marriage doesn't work out for some reason.

    I dont' know what that post is all about, but I certainly do have credit cards and bank accounts in my name, even though I'm a SAHM.
  • DiscgirlDiscgirl Posts: 746Registered Users
    The only part of the post directed at you was the quote about the purpose of SS. It supports what you were saying about the system being set up to be family friendly. The rest of it was general. You'd be surprised at the number of "well-educated", "accomplished" women who decide to be SAHM's and have no idea about their husband's retirement plan details, how much is in the 401(k), etc. I've also met many women who aren't comfortable with having any finances (whether it's a credit card or bank account in their own name) of their own b/c they consider it to show a lack of trust in their husband or faith in their marriage.
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