Burning/tanning by accident/patterns questions

BefrizzledBefrizzled Posts: 3,854Registered Users
Two years ago, I got a painful, bright red sunburn on my upper arms and chest, even though I had sunblock on. It eventually turned tan, but two years later, i still have marks on my arms, like a faded tan line. Even when I slather on the sunblock there, it still gets darker, but I don't notice it for a few days. Today, I was out reporting and didn't even think I'd be outside, so I didn't put on sunblock (I'm really not outside at all during the day, so I just wear it on my face--it's in my moisturizer), and I now have a lobster red burn on my chest from an hour max in the sun. However,e very other part of me that's exposed--arms, legs, with an exception of one little blob on each foot--is my usual pasty white (I'm so white people often think I'm wearing white stockings instead of having bare legs.. that is not a joke. My entire office spent a night musing over that.)

What would cause some parts of me to burn much worse than others, even when I have sunblock on or am not in the sun much at all? Trust me, if I know I'm going to be in the sun, I have sunblock on. Reporting was just a day thing.. I'm usually inside at a desk, at night. I'm inside when it's sunny. I'm also practically always covered up when I'm outside, which is why I wear it on my face everday--that's the exposed part.

Just curious.
Under construction.

Comments

  • CynaminbearCynaminbear Posts: 4,476Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.
    There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Posts: 3,854Registered Users
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.

    I don't even know how bad it was, though. It wasn't purple-y looking, it wasn't blistering, it was just bright red and I was in a fair amount of pain. Come to think of it, I had another chest and front leg burn the summer before my junior year of high school (this one was plain stupidity. I fully take the blame for that.) that the marks on my chest stuck around for. The marks are just like a faded tan line. The leg ones went away normally.
    Under construction.
  • ScarletScarlet Posts: 3,125Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.

    Happened to me too when I was in high school. I had on sunscreen, but my back and shoulders just burnt up, and I didn't even feel it until later that night. I had an outline from the top of my bikini on my back for several years.
    The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics - Thomas Sowell
  • cymprenicympreni Posts: 9,609Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Scarlet wrote:
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.

    Happened to me too when I was in high school. I had on sunscreen, but my back and shoulders just burnt up, and I didn't even feel it until later that night. I had an outline from the top of my bikini on my back for several years.

    I agree, I had a bad burn when I was a kid and I still burn in those areas pretty easily, even once on a trip to the store just a few blocks away I came home pinkish. And that burn was when I was 10 and I still have freckles on my shoulders on it, and a pinkish area on my chest that doesn't want to go away.
  • yagottaloveyacurlsyagottaloveyacurls Posts: 5,766Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.

    omg..I've never heard of that happening before!
  • curlinicatorcurlinicator Posts: 911Registered Users
    0
  • CynaminbearCynaminbear Posts: 4,476Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    It could be that bad burn has created a sensitivity in you.
    When I was a kid I wore a bikini and got a very bad burn. The marks were there for many years after.

    omg..I've never heard of that happening before!
    There were two spots that blistered a tiny bit and peeled. I had those two little cloud shapes for so long, and the bikini bottom line right under. That area never sees the sunlight anymore, so I don't know how it would react now. This happened back in the mid-70s.
    I also have bleached out spots on my leg from left over chemical treatment in our lake. It had been closed down for 2 summers. The year it reopened we swam as usual, I toweled off and some water dripped from my hair onto my leg. I watched the sun dry it up, and these white spots were left. I was around 7 and when my legs are tan they can be seen, still.
    There's no such thing as global warming. Chuck Norris was cold so he turned up the sun.
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Posts: 3,854Registered Users
    It just sucks, because I really do try to be so careful, and I have never burned that fast in my entire life as I did yesterday. Hell, once when I was younger and stupid, I laid out on a beach for three hours with no sunblock on, and nothing happened. No burn, no tan, nada. You can bet I'll be slathering on sunblock just in case I'm trekking out today.
    Under construction.
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,059 Administrator
    Well, if you're standing up, the sun kind of hits your shoulders and chest first. Your arms and legs are vertical and don't get as much sun -- but your feet can get hit too. I think it might just be the angle of the sun. (I'm guessing that your shoulders were covered by your clothing.)
  • JoyForeverJoyForever Posts: 1,628Registered Users
    Could be due to the time of day, the atmosphere, whether the environment provided a lot of surfaces for the sun to reflect off, etc. All of that could have an impact on how direct/harsh the sun's rays were at the time. And I'd bet that at different times in our life we are more or less sensitive to burning, too.
    Previously Joy4ever.
    Changed because the "number in place of a word" thing was bugging my no-longer-14-year-old self.

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