A couple of questions about a few different things

noelaninoelani Registered Users Posts: 665
So I've been getting my research on here at this site and I've come to the conclusion that yall love:

Honey
Coconut Oil
Shea

So my questions are this:

1. Honey can be found at the supermarket right?
2. When should it be applied?
3. Where in the world do I find coconut oil and when shoud it be applied?
4. When should shea butter be applied? On dry or wet hair?
5. Out of the 3 things which is your favorite and is it ok to use more than one of them?
"When you are not afraid to fall, that's when you fly the highest"


"You shouldnt let random people who dont love you , arent there to help you with a flat tire, or there to fix you soup when your tummy hurts dictate your choices in life."

Comments

  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Registered Users Posts: 17,898 Curl Virtuoso
    The only one of these ingredients I have used is honey. yes, it's the regular kind you buy at the supermarket. I've had mixed results w/ it. Sometimes phenomenally good...other times horrible. There's delicate balance to be achieved w/ honey, and I don't think I've quite mastered it. But I like to use it mixed in w/ my conditioner and then i rinse it all or mostly out. Or I might use a small amount (in place of gel) on top of or mixed with whatever creamy leave in product I'm using. I had the best hair day of my life doing that. But I've had some dreadful ones, also. If you have dark hair and don't want to risk lightening it, you might try molasses instead. It does the same thing but doesn't smell good.

    I don't have any advice about te other two products except tht you can probably get them at a health food store.

  • echokittenechokitten Registered Users Posts: 1,751
    Shea Butter is best when you can find it in a pure or raw state. You can sometimes find it in a health food store but I have seen some really good inexpensive sellers on eBay. It usually comes in 1/4lb. increments. It has a natural nutty odor and melts at body temperature.
    Coconut oils is a solid oil and can be found in healthfood stores and supermarkets with an international foods section. I have found that the best coconut oils are food grade quality and contain only coconut oil and no other additives. It is solid at room temperatures around 70 deg, but will melt into an oil at higher temps.
    I like the results that they both give me as far as hair applications go. I use them sparingly as a light leave in and add them to my DT concoctions as well. If you find that you have applied too much you can easily remove them with a non sulphate poo (sometimes it takes 2 washes).
    Cincinnati Ohio>>>Coarse protein sensitive 3a, Jessicurl WDT as a leave in, Biotera gel, White Boots, PW= coffeecurls

    "Man tries to exaggerate what nature has given him," Charles Darwin (1809-1882).

    "Nothing makes a woman more beautiful than the belief that she is beautiful." -Sophia Loren
  • noelaninoelani Registered Users Posts: 665
    echokitten wrote:
    Shea Butter is best when you can find it in a pure or raw state. You can sometimes find it in a health food store but I have seen some really good inexpensive sellers on eBay. It usually comes in 1/4lb. increments. It has a natural nutty odor and melts at body temperature.
    Coconut oils is a solid oil and can be found in healthfood stores and supermarkets with an international foods section. I have found that the best coconut oils are food grade quality and contain only coconut oil and no other additives. It is solid at room temperatures around 70 deg, but will melt into an oil at higher temps.
    I like the results that they both give me as far as hair applications go. I use them sparingly as a light leave in and add them to my DT concoctions as well. If you find that you have applied too much you can easily remove them with a non sulphate poo (sometimes it takes 2 washes).

    Thanks for your help. I found this over @ Sephora's website:
    P39675_hero.jpg

    100% Pure Shea Butter
    This buttery emollient is a powerful moisturizer. Retrieved directly from the fruit of the African shea tree, L'Occitane Shea Butter's natural benefits will protect, nourish, and moisturize dry and sensitive skin. To use, warm a nickel-sized amount in the palm of your hand and smooth onto rough feet, hands, elbows, knees, and any dry patch. May also be applied to hair as a deep conditioning treatment.

    Ingredients:
    0.26 oz Original:
    Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil.

    4.9 oz Original - Organic:
    Organic Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter) Fruit.

    Oh blah, I can't stand the smell of lavendar. Me and it do not mix. :roll: I was thinking of getting the 0.26 oz, it's $8. I just hope it don't smell like lavender, the smell makes me feel strange.
    "When you are not afraid to fall, that's when you fly the highest"


    "You shouldnt let random people who dont love you , arent there to help you with a flat tire, or there to fix you soup when your tummy hurts dictate your choices in life."
  • echokittenechokitten Registered Users Posts: 1,751
    That looks great. I forgot to answer your question regarding usage, sorry. I use mine (my raw shea) as a DT that I whipped with coconut oil. I apply a quarter sized amount to the length of my hair trying not to get too much on my scalp. Then I go do something for an hour or so and then rinse with very warm water for a long time until my hair feels like the oil/butter is mostly out. Then I co wash with something really good like Nature's Gate. Then if I'm going somewhere I fix my hair as usual, if not I plop for a while and forget the styling prods. I apply to wet or dry hair, it doesn't seem to matter.
    When I use it as a leave in under a gel, I use a very small amount like pea size and concentrate on the problem areas: ends and crown. Then I apply my gel plop.
    My favorite is the shea butter. It makes my hair soft, shiny and much less frizzy than when I use the coconut alone. It really makes a great leave in but I still need gel to seal the frizzies.
    Cincinnati Ohio>>>Coarse protein sensitive 3a, Jessicurl WDT as a leave in, Biotera gel, White Boots, PW= coffeecurls

    "Man tries to exaggerate what nature has given him," Charles Darwin (1809-1882).

    "Nothing makes a woman more beautiful than the belief that she is beautiful." -Sophia Loren
  • jeamariajeamaria Registered Users Posts: 1,851
    Since you've already got some good details on where to buy, I'll stick to usage. In order of preference:

    Honey: I use this almost every time I condition my hair. I mix it with the conditioner at about 60:40 (conditioner to honey, that is) it boosts the moisturizing ability of the conditioner, and it also helps me "stretch" some of the more expensive ones.

    Coconut oil: The only oil that actually absorbs into my hair. Studies have shown it actually helps strengthen the hair shaft from within. It makes my strands swell up till they are super plump, which makes my hair way too voluminous and stiff to deal with if I use it as a leave in. Instead, I enjoy the strengthening benefits by adding a teaspoon or so to some conditioner as an overnight deep treatment.

    Shea butter: I haven't had much luck with this stuff, though many people do. I find it pulls out my curl, and doesn't really absorb-it coats the strands, making it very dry underneath. If you are completely CG, you need to use this stuff sparingly, because it can be difficult to get out of the hair. I do use it occasionally to twist my hair, but always over a moisturizing leave in, and very sparingly.
  • SuburbanbushbabeSuburbanbushbabe Registered Users Posts: 15,402 Curl Neophyte
    noelani wrote:
    Thanks for your help. I found this over @ Sephora's website:

    100% Pure Shea Butter
    This buttery emollient is a powerful moisturizer. Retrieved directly from the fruit of the African shea tree, L'Occitane Shea Butter's natural benefits will protect, nourish, and moisturize dry and sensitive skin. To use, warm a nickel-sized amount in the palm of your hand and smooth onto rough feet, hands, elbows, knees, and any dry patch. May also be applied to hair as a deep conditioning treatment.

    Ingredients:
    0.26 oz Original:
    Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil.

    4.9 oz Original - Organic:
    Organic Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter) Fruit.

    Oh blah, I can't stand the smell of lavendar. Me and it do not mix. :roll: I was thinking of getting the 0.26 oz, it's $8. I just hope it don't smell like lavender, the smell makes me feel strange.

    You can find pure sheabutter for waaaay cheaper than L'Occitane. Try Shea Terra. They have both West African and East African Shea butter (I have not idea what the distinction is). I ahve a little think of their west African shea butter and love it - using it on my eyelids at night, rubbing a tiny bit into hair. http://www.sheaterraorganics.com/ Or Try a health food store in your town.
    My blog - http://suburbanbushbabe.wordpress.com/
    My FOTKI - http://whatsnew.fotki.com/suburbanbushbabe/
    comic-p.jpg

    Playing with my hair is a hobby. Fluffy, fine natural 4a. Goal= Healthy, beautiful hair that retains its length.
    Hear that crash? It's me falling off the CG wagon.

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