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Tri-Vi-Sol for breastfed babies?

medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
Is this stuff really necessary? I exclusively breastfed my son and daughter without vitamin D supplements and neither of them developed Rickets.

Do you give your baby vitamin D supplements?

Comments

  • deezee02deezee02 Posts: 1,509Registered Users
    I acutally just asked my pedi about vitamins for Steven. She said only breastfed babies need them.
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  • Jenny CJenny C Posts: 1,195Registered Users
    I gave them to Lucy, but not religiously - pretty much whenever I remembered. She was fine.
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  • cosmicflycosmicfly Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    I exclusively breastfed both of my babies and I did not give a supplement. After a year, I did start to give them a multivitamin.

    The Vitamin D recommendation comes from an increased (but still small)incidence of Ricketts, particularly among dark skinned breastfed babies who may not get enough Vitamin D from incidental sun exposure. I actually worked with a baby with Ricketts in NYC, so it can happen.

    If I had supplemented, I probably would have asked for just Vitamin D, as the other necessary nutrients are contained in breastmilk.
  • DarkAngelDarkAngel Posts: 2,671Registered Users
    My doctor said that he didn't think it was necessary. He poopooed all of the supplements that were recommended to us on discharge from NICU because he believed breastmilk would do everything we needed.
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  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    So caucasian breastfed babies don't need vitamin D supplements?
  • mad scientistmad scientist Posts: 3,530Registered Users
    medussa wrote:
    So caucasian breastfed babies don't need vitamin D supplements?

    I think the difference comes from the amount of vitamin D that is produced by the body with exposure to sunlight. For white babies, I think the necessary amount is 15-30 minutes a day of direct sunlight (ie. not through a window) which most babies get. For darker skinned babies its more than that because our skin doesn't absorb as much UV radiation.

    With regards to your original question, DS was born in California and vitamin D was never mentioned to me at all. But we spent 3 winter months back in Canada and here it is a standard recommendation that in the winter, breastfed babies should be given vitamin D. In fact in Canada you can buy vitamin D supplement alone (D-vi-sol or generic) which isn't available in the US.

    I did give vitamin D to my breastfed baby during those winter months in Ottawa, but didn't bother when we were in California.
  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    my baby looks white and is half white so does she count as caucasian?
  • FionaFiona Posts: 158Registered Users
    I live in Australia, where there is plenty of incidental sunshine and it's unheard of to give babies vitamin D supplements, or to give breastfed babies supplements of any kind.

    Babies used to be given what were called 'sunkicks', where you would strip them off and lie them on a blanket in the sun for 15 minutes or so so that they would get their vitamin D. Sunblock won't affect the absorbtion of Vit D, so you can safely put them out in the morning sun (I'm not advocating you exposing a baby to the summer midday sun :) ) with sunblock on and they'll get their dose.
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  • mad scientistmad scientist Posts: 3,530Registered Users
    subbrock wrote:
    my baby looks white and is half white so does she count as caucasian?

    Interesting question. I think its simply of matter of fair skin vs darker skin, not genetic background. But I'm not sure. I assume if you are fairer skinned (of whatever ethnicity or mix) then your skin processes sunlight more efficiently. If you are darker skinned, your skin blocks out most of the sunlight so you need more exposure to produce the same amount of vitamin D.
  • cosmicflycosmicfly Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    subbrock wrote:
    my baby looks white and is half white so does she count as caucasian?

    Interesting question. I think its simply of matter of fair skin vs darker skin, not genetic background. But I'm not sure. I assume if you are fairer skinned (of whatever ethnicity or mix) then your skin processes sunlight more efficiently. If you are darker skinned, your skin blocks out most of the sunlight so you need more exposure to produce the same amount of vitamin D.

    This is my understanding as well, although I am not sure either. I am white, my kids are half white, they're quite a bit darker than I am but closer to my color than their father's. I was told when my son was born that his darker complexion put him at higher risk for elevated bilirubin levels, but I'm not sure they're dark enough to be at risk for Vitamin D deficiency.

    The issue is for breastfed babies who do not receive enough incidental sun exposure. My understanding is that the risk increases with darker skin, and for babies who are kept indoors most of the time (as can happen in urban areas where it's not as simple as going out to sit in the backyard or whatever). I don't think you need a lot of sun exposure to get your Vitamin D, though.
  • internetchickinternetchick Posts: 6,191Registered Users
    I breastfed all 3 and never gave the Vit D supplement and was never recommended to by their pediatricians.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users
    I never gave any of my kids vitamin supplements; neither as infants or as children. None of us take vitamins, and we're all exceedingly healthy. We get our vitamins from food.
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users
    Fiona wrote:
    I live in Australia, where there is plenty of incidental sunshine and it's unheard of to give babies vitamin D supplements, or to give breastfed babies supplements of any kind.

    Babies used to be given what were called 'sunkicks', where you would strip them off and lie them on a blanket in the sun for 15 minutes or so so that they would get their vitamin D. Sunblock won't affect the absorbtion of Vit D, so you can safely put them out in the morning sun (I'm not advocating you exposing a baby to the summer midday sun :) ) with sunblock on and they'll get their dose.
    My mom still talks about how when she had babies, this was what all the moms did. She's convinced that since people are so afraid of the sun and skin cancer now, vitamin d deficiency in babies is inevitable. :)
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  • mad scientistmad scientist Posts: 3,530Registered Users
    mrspoppers wrote:
    My mom still talks about how when she had babies, this was what all the moms did. She's convinced that since people are so afraid of the sun and skin cancer now, vitamin d deficiency in babies is inevitable. :)

    I remember reading that there definitely has been an increase in rickets in the last 10 or so years since all the sun warnings have come out. Not sure about babies specifically, but in adults. Kids (over age 1) tend to be ok since they usually drink milk which is vit D fortified.
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    I think they're basing this "advice" on my complexion. My son was born in 1999, before doctors were recommending Tri-vi-sol. He was pasty white. I think he's still the fairest of my kids. I never gave him supplements and he turned out fine. My middle child is the darkest of my kids (she's in my avatar) and I skipped the supplements with her too. Lilly is pretty fair also and we get out in the sun everyday (it's summertime :P ). I'm thinking of returning the vitamins. Waste of money, I think.

    Thanks for chiming in with your experiences.
  • geminigemini Posts: 3,325Registered Users
    I'm late ( :lol: ), but I never gave D supplements to my daughter, it was never recommended during any of her doctor visits, she was exclusively breastfed and she is quite a bit darker than your kids, medussa.
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    I really haven't seen any kids with bowed legs and bowed arms since perhaps the 70's. And even then, it was limited to one or two kids from very poor families. But that might've been hereditary.
    Vitamin D is made by the body when it is exposed to ultraviolet light (sunlight). Vitamin D is also added to milk, milk products, and multi-vitamin pills. Some people who do not get enough sun exposure, milk products, or green vegetables may also develop the disease, but that rarely happens anymore. Hereditary rickets, is caused by an inherited disease that interferes with the resorption of renal tubular phosphate in the kidney. Rickets can also be caused by certain liver diseases. A similar disorder can occur in adults, and is called osteomalacia. Then, it is caused by the inability of bone cells to calcify, or harden. Less frequently, nutritional shortage of calcium or phosphorus may produce rickets.

    health-cares.net

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  • M2LRM2LR Posts: 8,630Registered Users
    medussa wrote:
    So caucasian breastfed babies don't need vitamin D supplements?

    No.

    My daughter needed them. Pedi said that since she was born during the winter months (February) that she wouldn't be outside enough to get vit D from the sun, etc. They weren't recommended for my son, he was born in August.

    Both were breastfed for 11 months.
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  • CurleeDSTCurleeDST Posts: 467Registered Users
    i was advised to give my son poly vi sol and I was like " i didn't need this for my daughter" so I did not buy it for him. we go outside in the sun like daily so he is getting vitamin D.
    medussa wrote:
    Is this stuff really necessary? I exclusively breastfed my son and daughter without vitamin D supplements and neither of them developed Rickets.

    Do you give your baby vitamin D supplements?
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  • SigiSigi Posts: 2,379Registered Users
    I was given them for both of my babies. I gave birth at the native hospital, so I think all babies were given them. I gave them the drops when I remembered and never replenished the bottle. I don't know what rickets is, but I don't think my kids got it.
  • wavezncurlzwavezncurlz Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    I was told that this is still a controversial thing. I tried to give it to Kennedy but she hated the taste (even hidden in b-milk). I eventually gave up. She was so big and strong and seemed to get enough sunlight.
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  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    Our pedi recommended them and I ignored him.
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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    medussa wrote:
    Is this stuff really necessary? I exclusively breastfed my son and daughter without vitamin D supplements and neither of them developed Rickets.

    Do you give your baby vitamin D supplements?

    the hospital told me to as long as he is breastfed, because of our northern climate. I am giving him them.
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  • Oregano  (formerly babywavy)Oregano (formerly babywavy) Posts: 5,297Registered Users
    It was never recommeded to me. I continue taking prenatals while I'm breastfeeding, but I've never given them additional vitamins. My children are incredibly healthy. My toddler has never had an ear infection, and she was sick all of 6 times in her first 2 years of life.
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  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    my pediatrician recommended these for majerle today, but i cant find them anywhere. only poly vi sol. does it really matter?
  • j'adorej'adore Posts: 1,966Registered Users
    I think my pediatrician mentioned them, too. But I never did it.
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  • curly_keltiecurly_keltie Posts: 791Registered Users
    I gave DS Vitamin D drops daily until it started to become a huge struggle - around 9 months. I asked his pediatrician about it and he said since it was summer time and we were outside on a daily basis - it would be fine to stop giving DS the drops.
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