Areata,Traction?! The Alopecia Thread

Hairblogger â„¢Hairblogger â„¢ Registered Users Posts: 564
Hey everyone: (sorry for double posting all over the boards)

Most know that I have Areata and dermatitis and such, and I get a lot of questions, so I just thought I'd post this general information for anyone who may need it.

Note: I've used the following combination therapy for the past few years: Monthly corticosterois injections and Anthralin 1% (brand name; Psoriatec) during episodes. The Anthralin is very strong, you can only leave it on the skin for 20-40 minutes or so at a time, so it's really important to read the application and rinsing instructions carefully before use. Also, I apply a little olive oil to my skin/scalp as a protective base about an hour or so prior to using Anthralin (it nourishes and protects the skin, but doesn't prevent the medicine from penetrationg the skin).

Alopecia areata is generally characterized by one or more localized areas of complete hair loss (with the initial Alopecia Areata lesions appearing as smooth bald patches of variable size with or without 'exclamation mark' stubble (on or at the periphery)) and that sometimes may spread throughout the entire scalp or body as in Alopecia totalis or Alopecia universalis. The recurrence rate is 30 percent, and recurrence usually affects the initial area of involvement. Individuals with Areata are not always good candidates for hair restoration surgery because the hairloss is not permanent AND recurring.

Traction alopecia is a temporary condition generally caused by stressful styling and is most common among women of African or Asian ancestry (who practice traditional complicated styling practices, but even sleek ponytails can cause this to happen). though, for the most part, Traction Alopecia can be successfully treated if treated within 5-years of occurence.

Toxic Alopecia usually affects those who have a serious medical condition such as cancer or are pregnant or have recently given birth.

Alopecia is treatable, but in any form may become permanent if not treated within 16 months of initial hairloss and/or if stressful styling practices are not discontinued by the patient.

**Spontaneous recovery of most forms of Alopecia usually occurs within six to 12 months, but severe episodes may take as long as 24 months or even longer (with hair in areas of regrowth often being pigmented differently).

Treatment:
Monthly Cortisone (steroidal) Injections is a medical treatment that is used to treat both, Areata-alopecia (chronic/recurring hairloss) AND non-scarring Traction-alopecia (style related hairloss from use of chemicals, braid-extensions, and other types of extensions as well as overly tight ponytails, etc). In general 4-6 monthly sessions of injections are required to see any change and in more severe cases, it may require even longer periods of treatment (If you require more than 3 or four rounds of treatment and/or your doctor refuses to continue with your therapy, just seek another physician and rotate doctors).

Best Alopecia (Areata) Combination Therapy Rec: Anthralin, an anti-psoriatic, used in combination with topical corticosteroids is a good choice for those with extensive disease (multiple or very large areas/patches of hairloss).

About Immunomodulators
Corticosteroids **
Anthralin (Anthra-Derm) **
PUVA / psoralen plus ultraviolet A.
Contact sensitizers (experimental)
Dinitrochlorobenzene
Squaric acid dibutyl ester **
Diphenylcyclopropenone

Cortisone treatments are used for both mild and excessive hair loss. Injections are often used at stages where a patient is only losing patches of hair, while pills take a more aggressive route when the situation becomes more severe. Cortisone is injected into patches of bare skin on the scalp, in the hopes that it will stimulate growth in these areas. Although injections aren’t preventive they are often successful at producing new hair within four weeks. Due to the aggression of cortisone pills, you should fully research the side effects and success rate before trying them.

Anthralin, an anti-psoriatic, in combination with topical corticosteroids is a good choice for use in children and those with extensive disease because it is relatively easy to use and clinical irritation may not be required for efficacy. Anthralin is a powerful synthetic substance that is used in a cream or ointment. Although it can be applied daily to bald patches, anthralin often causes irritation and discoloration of the skin. The process of stimulating new hair growth is longer with anthralin, taking 8 to 12 weeks.

Immunotherapy is a very serious and potentially harmful way to treat the Alopecia Areata disease. This method employs chemicals like diphencyprone (DPCP), and squaric acid dibutyl ester (SADBE) to stimulate an allergic reaction in your body. Although effective in stimulating hair re-growth it is a long process that produces uncomfortable allergenic conditions in the body.

Note: It is also a good idea to increase you B-vitamin intake and vegan protein intake as well (lots of soy, veggies, beans, fruits, water, etc.).

Unfortunately, in instances of Androgenetic aka male-female pattern hairloss, surgical replacement/transplantation will be required.

Good luck!
'Goddess Hair & Skin Recipe Book' devotee 4life!

Co-Wash: Aubrey O. HoneySuckleRose Cond.
Poo: 1-2x ~monthly~ w/AO 'poo+Baking Soda
DT: Honey + any Aubrey Condish
Leave-Ins: Sheamoisture / RJML Cactus / KBBmilk!


[/COLOR]

Comments

  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,060 Administrator
    I believe I have traction alopecia (self diagnosed of course). I have a strip across the back of my scalp that is thin and a spot in the front of my scalp that is bare. It is as a result of corn row braids. I tried to treat the areas too late. When the damage in the back occured, I figuerd if I gave it time it would grow back, but I was wrong. It is 3 years later and that area is still very thin. I read that I should have massaged and treated the area at the time it occured, to avoid the hair follicle closing up and causing permanent scarring. I believe vitamin E was recommended. I believe only surgery will replace that hair there now. I am more cautious about getting braids now. I haven't had corn rows since. I still get micros, but I request they be put in gently. I will post my Fotki address for you all to see soon.
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,060 Administrator
    visit my site for pictures of my damaged hair. boo hoo

    http://public.fotki.com/OsoCristie/
  • Hairblogger â„¢Hairblogger â„¢ Registered Users Posts: 564
    I looked at your pics and I honestly don't think it's too late for your hair --

    I post alot about alopecia-areata, but have learned a lot over the years about all forms of alopecia and find that what many don't realize is that the primary method of treatment for both, alopecia-areata and traction-alopecia is exactly the same; corticosteroid injections.

    My one friend finally able to get her traction alopecia treated successsfully and her problem was left untreated a lot longer than three years, although it took her a looong time t find a doctor, I think she was giving them too much information, as soon as she would tell them how long her condition had been, they wouldn't do anything except say it been too long, but the only way to know if your condition is treatable or not is for them to actually inject the medicine and observe it over a few months to see if there is any reaction (my cousin's in med school now and he said there are a lot of problems with womwn getting treatment for hairloss because the trend now is to encourage/drive them to surgical hair treatment even if it is not needed--the injections can take a while for areata alopecia and even longer for traction related alopecia, so for many new doc's going into cosmetic dermatology, medical dermatology just isn't as appealing), --but, she finally made an appointment with a new doctor who specializes in medical dermatology only who specializes in the steroid injection treatments in particular (it took her a loong time to find this one, btw) but just to be safe, this time she was more vague about how much time actually passed before treatment and when she said December or so, they just assumed she meant a few months ago (this was at the end of February) --and she has been having treatments every 6 weeks and showed response after the third treatment and is scheduled to continue the injections as needed until the patch fills the rest of the way in (she had her fourth treatment last week--I think she will need at least 6 or more to fill in so it will just grow normally again on it's own)...

    But the doctor specifically told her if she wants to wear her hair plaited, it has to be her own hair with no weave-weight... So she just can't wear any more extensions, and now she is actually learning how to style her naturally hair as well as care for it.

    If after six rounds of injections you have absolutely no response (no little hairs comming in where the medicine was injected) then your traction may be scarring, but if you respond, then it's simply a matte of recieving proper treatment and only if you don't respond to the injection therapy do you need to consider a costly hair transpant surgical procedure. I am crossing my fingers for you that you do respond to the cortisone injections but you have to go in for treatment to find out for sure. It takes time, and the longer you have had the probem the longer it will take to recover, that's why it's best to go in as soon as any hairloss or injury occurs. but, it is not too late. just remember, go to to a medical dermatologist (and don't tell them you waited three years before treating your hairloss :wink: ).

    Special note; the triamcinolone [sp?] injections are the common name for the kenalog injections (brand name), but either should suffice. If you're not sure where to go try the local hospitals or university hospitals in your area, since they get funds for research, they usually have at least 5 or more medical dermatology specialists who treat alopecia. Try an older doctor, they usually are more patient than the younger ones who sometimes lack the empathy of a more mature physician.

    Good luck! And keep me posted.
    'Goddess Hair & Skin Recipe Book' devotee 4life!

    Co-Wash: Aubrey O. HoneySuckleRose Cond.
    Poo: 1-2x ~monthly~ w/AO 'poo+Baking Soda
    DT: Honey + any Aubrey Condish
    Leave-Ins: Sheamoisture / RJML Cactus / KBBmilk!


    [/COLOR]
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,060 Administrator
    Very well! Thanks for the inside scoop on hair growth. I am going to start looking into a DR. ASAP. If you happen to run across info on any Doctors in Atlanta, please let me know. Thanks for taking the time out to share this precious information!
  • Hairblogger â„¢Hairblogger â„¢ Registered Users Posts: 564
    Here's what a blind search turned up:

    Atlanta Hair Specialists

    Call A Doctor –Physicians Directory Atlanta:

    http://www.calladoctor.net

    http://www.calladoctor.net/physicians-specialtiesatlanta/conyers/dermatology.htm



    Georgia hair Transplant & Restoration Directory:

    http://www.omnimedicalsearch.com/hair_restoration/georgia.html


    Atlanta DP Dermatology-Dermatologists Specialists:

    http://www.dpderm.com/?s=atlanta_dermatology_links


    Also, you might try any of the university hospitals in your area as well.

    Good luck!
    'Goddess Hair & Skin Recipe Book' devotee 4life!

    Co-Wash: Aubrey O. HoneySuckleRose Cond.
    Poo: 1-2x ~monthly~ w/AO 'poo+Baking Soda
    DT: Honey + any Aubrey Condish
    Leave-Ins: Sheamoisture / RJML Cactus / KBBmilk!


    [/COLOR]

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file