Question about Gastric Lap Band Surgery

BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
A family friend had this surgery, and he had to go through 6 months of therapy/discussion groups before he could have it. My mother is obese and is seriously considering this surgery. She is also severely disabled from a car accident, and her doctor is not sure it will help as much as she would like it to, because she cannot exercise due to her physical condition, which largely contributed to the current situation. Anyway, she knows she doesn't have the patience for 6 months of that, and that if it were mandatory, she'd never make it to the point of the surgery. Not that I necessarily agree with wanting to forgo it, but I do know that she wouldn't do it. Is there any way to get around it? Is it mandatory everywhere, or is it just a hospital policy? Anyone have any info?
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  • Oregano  (formerly babywavy)Oregano (formerly babywavy) Registered Users Posts: 5,297 Curl Neophyte
    I think it's probably the policy of the hospital, or the area, since I know people who have had it done w/o any kind of therapy beforehand. Personally though, I think it's a good idea. If you are seriously overweight, it's probably due to more than just being hungry all the time, and you need something other than a severe appetite suppressant.
    ~ the artist formerly known as babywavy ~

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  • amerasiancurlsamerasiancurls Registered Users Posts: 168
    I agree w/Babywavy that it may just be hospital/clinic or even an area policy. I know two people who have had it done and only one attended group meetings and informational seminars, etc., and that was by choice. She wanted to find out as much about it as possible and wanted to know what the difference was between gastric bypass and lapband procedure. It was never required for her to attend those types of things.
  • amerasiancurlsamerasiancurls Registered Users Posts: 168
    Oops! Double post!
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    babywavy wrote:
    I think it's probably the policy of the hospital, or the area, since I know people who have had it done w/o any kind of therapy beforehand. Personally though, I think it's a good idea. If you are seriously overweight, it's probably due to more than just being hungry all the time, and you need something other than a severe appetite suppressant.

    She said she'd be ok with an eval or even a month of stuff like that. She just knows she wouldn't stick to a 6 month presurgery therapy, etc. plan. I completely agree with you, though.

    Another problem is that no one local does it, so she'd have to travel about 2 hours. I keep telling her it's worth it. Because I've seen her try so many times with minimal success, I'm pretty much for anything that'll add years to her life. She's also thinking about it for my brother. I come from a family of big people/emotional eaters on both sides. I'm just kind of sad this wasn't around while my dad was alive. Morbid obesity was listed as a subcause on his death certificate. I don't want that to happen to anyone else in my family, and knowing that she's considering it and has already spoken to her heart doc and her general physician is encouraging.
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  • ScarletScarlet Registered Users Posts: 3,125 Curl Neophyte
    I think after the surgery, patients have to be very mindful of how much, and what, they eat. I'm thinking that if she doesn't want to go through the pre-surgery stuff, will she be willing to do what she has to after the surgery?
    The first lesson of economics is scarcity: There is never enough of anything to satisfy all those who want it. The first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics - Thomas Sowell
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    Scarlet wrote:
    I think after the surgery, patients have to be very mindful of how much, and what, they eat. I'm thinking that if she doesn't want to go through the pre-surgery stuff, will she be willing to do what she has to after the surgery?

    I think so. She can stick to a plan really well, but she gets super discouraged when she doesn't see results, which are slower than the average person because of her inability to work out. This typically gets quicker/more drastic results (than the 0-2lb/week loss) that she'd see much sooner, so I think she'd be less likely to stray.
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  • mad scientistmad scientist Registered Users Posts: 3,530 Curl Neophyte
    Each surgeon/clinic has its own set of guidelines which they hope will set their patients up for success (and weed out the ones who won't benefit). Some are more stringent than others.

    My husband does this surgery, and he requires anyone wanting to undergo the surgery to first lose 10% of their body mass on their own, and keep it off for 3 months. I don't think he requires 6 months of counselling, but there is definitely some component.


  • SuburbanbushbabeSuburbanbushbabe Registered Users Posts: 15,402 Curl Neophyte
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.
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  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.

    She's not opposed to some kind of counseling commitment. She just knows that if she has to sit through 6 months of counseling, information sessions and group discussions that she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious. My internet is incredibly slow, so I asked here instead of doing searches online, but I did come across a site that said they had a month commitment, and she said that's even fine. And she looks at the guy who WENT through the six months and it hasn't really helped him. He relies solely on the band to lose weight and has gone in several times to have it tightened because he'll gain weight back and doesn't want to work to lose it on his own. He doesn't really work with it, he just expects it to work.
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  • Who Me?Who Me? Registered Users Posts: 3,181
    Befrizzled wrote:
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.

    She's not opposed to some kind of counseling commitment. She just knows that if she has to sit through 6 months of counseling, information sessions and group discussions that she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious. My internet is incredibly slow, so I asked here instead of doing searches online, but I did come across a site that said they had a month commitment, and she said that's even fine. And she looks at the guy who WENT through the six months and it hasn't really helped him. He relies solely on the band to lose weight and has gone in several times to have it tightened because he'll gain weight back and doesn't want to work to lose it on his own. He doesn't really work with it, he just expects it to work.

    What makes you think your mother is going to work with it if she's not even willing to go to the sessions before hand? I think a major point of the info sessions and counseling beforehand is to educate people on how to work with it. Of course, it doesn't work for everyone (like the guy you mentioned), but I bet there is a better rate of people working with the band if they've had all the sessions than with people who haven't.
    "I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!" -BART SIMPSON
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    Who Me? wrote:
    Befrizzled wrote:
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.

    She's not opposed to some kind of counseling commitment. She just knows that if she has to sit through 6 months of counseling, information sessions and group discussions that she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious. My internet is incredibly slow, so I asked here instead of doing searches online, but I did come across a site that said they had a month commitment, and she said that's even fine. And she looks at the guy who WENT through the six months and it hasn't really helped him. He relies solely on the band to lose weight and has gone in several times to have it tightened because he'll gain weight back and doesn't want to work to lose it on his own. He doesn't really work with it, he just expects it to work.

    What makes you think your mother is going to work with it if she's not even willing to go to the sessions before hand? I think a major point of the info sessions and counseling beforehand is to educate people on how to work with it. Of course, it doesn't work for everyone (like the guy you mentioned), but I bet there is a better rate of people working with the band if they've had all the sessions than with people who haven't.

    Because I know my mother and understand how she operates, so to speak. And again, she's not opposed to sessions beforehand. It's not as if she were against the whole principle. She knows herself, and she knows that having to go through six months of something before the surgery once she already made the decision to do it is more likely to have a negative effect than a positive one. She said she's all for similar sessions, but more compressed into a shorter time frame. It's not like she's saying that the only way she'll have the surgery is if she can skip out on any of it. She's more than happy to have a psych eval, whatever. Like one of the posters mentioned, the sessions someone went to were about research, etc., things that she's been doing for months already. She has no problem with nutrition sessions, etc., for learning how to work with it. Since the six month thing is not required everywhere and other places can do it in a much shorter time frame, it doesn't appear that the length of time had to be so long. I'd be willing to bet that she'd be willing to do the same work as this other guy did in a shorter time frame, more compressed, more sessions per week, whatever, and still get more out of it than he did.
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  • SuburbanbushbabeSuburbanbushbabe Registered Users Posts: 15,402 Curl Neophyte
    Befrizzled wrote:
    Who Me? wrote:
    Befrizzled wrote:
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.

    She's not opposed to some kind of counseling commitment. She just knows that if she has to sit through 6 months of counseling, information sessions and group discussions that she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious. My internet is incredibly slow, so I asked here instead of doing searches online, but I did come across a site that said they had a month commitment, and she said that's even fine. And she looks at the guy who WENT through the six months and it hasn't really helped him. He relies solely on the band to lose weight and has gone in several times to have it tightened because he'll gain weight back and doesn't want to work to lose it on his own. He doesn't really work with it, he just expects it to work.

    What makes you think your mother is going to work with it if she's not even willing to go to the sessions before hand? I think a major point of the info sessions and counseling beforehand is to educate people on how to work with it. Of course, it doesn't work for everyone (like the guy you mentioned), but I bet there is a better rate of people working with the band if they've had all the sessions than with people who haven't.

    Because I know my mother and understand how she operates, so to speak. And again, she's not opposed to sessions beforehand. It's not as if she were against the whole principle. She knows herself, and she knows that having to go through six months of something before the surgery once she already made the decision to do it is more likely to have a negative effect than a positive one. She said she's all for similar sessions, but more compressed into a shorter time frame. It's not like she's saying that the only way she'll have the surgery is if she can skip out on any of it. She's more than happy to have a psych eval, whatever. Like one of the posters mentioned, the sessions someone went to were about research, etc., things that she's been doing for months already. She has no problem with nutrition sessions, etc., for learning how to work with it. Since the six month thing is not required everywhere and other places can do it in a much shorter time frame, it doesn't appear that the length of time had to be so long. I'd be willing to bet that she'd be willing to do the same work as this other guy did in a shorter time frame, more compressed, more sessions per week, whatever, and still get more out of it than he did.

    That's one of the points of the long counseling, to weed out those who don't have a full commitment to it or who don't really need it for whatever reason, or who just don't have the patience to deal with the major changes/side effects. Just because the surgery is faster than say, a long-term commitment to changing eating habits, many people think it's more convenient. It's not, from what I've heard, and that is part of what the 6-month counseling component is for. It's hard to understand why she doesn't see how this time is going to benefit her; maybe she should rethink her commitment to the surgery. It's a life-long change -- what is 6-months compared to that?
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  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    Befrizzled wrote:
    Who Me? wrote:
    Befrizzled wrote:
    One of the women at work has been in the 6-month therapy part of the process and she may had the surgery by the time I return to work. One of the dancers in the troupe I performed with had it last year and it really brings more than just physical changes according to her. This is surgery is a huge move; I think your mom is willing to commit to the surgery she should be willing to commit to the counseling as well.

    She's not opposed to some kind of counseling commitment. She just knows that if she has to sit through 6 months of counseling, information sessions and group discussions that she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious. My internet is incredibly slow, so I asked here instead of doing searches online, but I did come across a site that said they had a month commitment, and she said that's even fine. And she looks at the guy who WENT through the six months and it hasn't really helped him. He relies solely on the band to lose weight and has gone in several times to have it tightened because he'll gain weight back and doesn't want to work to lose it on his own. He doesn't really work with it, he just expects it to work.

    What makes you think your mother is going to work with it if she's not even willing to go to the sessions before hand? I think a major point of the info sessions and counseling beforehand is to educate people on how to work with it. Of course, it doesn't work for everyone (like the guy you mentioned), but I bet there is a better rate of people working with the band if they've had all the sessions than with people who haven't.

    Because I know my mother and understand how she operates, so to speak. And again, she's not opposed to sessions beforehand. It's not as if she were against the whole principle. She knows herself, and she knows that having to go through six months of something before the surgery once she already made the decision to do it is more likely to have a negative effect than a positive one. She said she's all for similar sessions, but more compressed into a shorter time frame. It's not like she's saying that the only way she'll have the surgery is if she can skip out on any of it. She's more than happy to have a psych eval, whatever. Like one of the posters mentioned, the sessions someone went to were about research, etc., things that she's been doing for months already. She has no problem with nutrition sessions, etc., for learning how to work with it. Since the six month thing is not required everywhere and other places can do it in a much shorter time frame, it doesn't appear that the length of time had to be so long. I'd be willing to bet that she'd be willing to do the same work as this other guy did in a shorter time frame, more compressed, more sessions per week, whatever, and still get more out of it than he did.

    That's one of the points of the long counseling, to weed out those who don't have a full commitment to it or who don't really need it for whatever reason, or who just don't have the patience to deal with the major changes/side effects. Just because the surgery is faster than say, a long-term commitment to changing eating habits, many people think it's more convenient. It's not, from what I've heard, and that is part of what the 6-month counseling component is for. It's hard to understand why she doesn't see how this time is going to benefit her; maybe she should rethink her commitment to the surgery. It's a life-long change -- what is 6-months compared to that?

    I can understand what you're saying, but I'm not going to argue with you over it. Each person is different. I don't think she thinks that it's more convenient. She literally has tried about everything under the sun. Before her accident, she was at the gym everyday. Now, she can't do that. She's tried nutritionists, diets, etc., and none of them alone were enough to the job. Like I said, the doctor isn't even sure this will be a massive help to her, but her cardiologist is encouraging her to continue considering it. She DOES see a benefit to what's IN the program, but she knows that the time she'd have to pass until she could get what she already decided would not affect her positively. She wants to start the work, not make the decision and then have to wait. If she can put all of those benefits into a shorter time frame so she can get on with it, she would. Apparently, that's something she CAN do, and if she decides to have this surgery, it's the option she'd choose.

    ETA: The six month sessions weren't mostly counseling. They were group discussions and information sessions. She's already done a lot of the research. She doesn't want to have to HAVE to hear it over and over again for that amount of time.

    Again, I completely agree that she should go through SOME sort of counseling. I think skipping out on any/all of it would be a big mistake.
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  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Registered Users Posts: 17,898 Curl Virtuoso
    Befrizzled wrote:
    she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious.

    That could be the very point of it -- with any commitment to achieve an important and difficult goal there are going to be tests of patience, repetition, info gathering, PITA hard work, PITA stupid work, etc. Getting the patients to adopt that kind of "grit your teeth and bear it" mindset could be part of the whole strategy? I don't know. I'm just wondering.

  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    Befrizzled wrote:
    she'd have a hard time keeping the patience. From what I've read, a lot of it has to do with making sure it's what you want, talking to people who have had it done, getting more info on it, etc., stuff that she's already done a lot of on her own, and she'd find having to do it again to be repetitious.

    That could be the very point of it -- with any commitment to achieve an important and difficult goal there are going to be tests of patience, repetition, info gathering, PITA hard work, PITA stupid work, etc. Getting the patients to adopt that kind of "grit your teeth and bear it" mindset could be part of the whole strategy? I don't know. I'm just wondering.

    It just seems like it's not necessary if it's not required everywhere, you know? I think SOMETHING should be required, but if she's done her research, talked to several doctors on her own, it's not like she's going in needing to gather as much information as someone who is first starting out. She's also the queen of grit your teeth and bear it. She fights for what she wants--like when the doctors told her she'd never walk again or have kids. She proved them wrong on both counts. She's pretty aware of herself. I'm just glad there are other options than the six month thing. That was a hospital in NY, and she's already researched and spoken to doctors about what hospitals she would go to, and none of her options are in NY at this point.
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  • BlueEyesAndCurlsBlueEyesAndCurls Registered Users Posts: 18
    I had lapband surgery in October of 2004. I have lost 160 pounds........50 of those on my own before surgery. It is NOT a quick fix. It is a total lifestyle change. The band doesn't work on it's own. You have to 'work' the band. It takes determination and lots of hard work. If your mom doesn't have the patience for the 6 months of pre-op stuff then I strongly suggest that she doesn't get the band. Also, my band slipped this past year and I had to have another surgery to repair it. Is your mom up for all of that? I hope she thinks about it long and hard. It is not an easy thing to do.
  • M2LRM2LR Registered Users Posts: 8,630 Curl Connoisseur
    I had lapband surgery in October of 2004. I have lost 160 pounds........50 of those on my own before surgery. It is NOT a quick fix. It is a total lifestyle change. The band doesn't work on it's own. You have to 'work' the band. It takes determination and lots of hard work. If your mom doesn't have the patience for the 6 months of pre-op stuff then I strongly suggest that she doesn't get the band. Also, my band slipped this past year and I had to have another surgery to repair it. Is your mom up for all of that? I hope she thinks about it long and hard. It is not an easy thing to do.

    Congrats on your weight loss!!!

    I think it's great to have someone who has actually been through it post about it.

    I haven't had it done, but know a couple of people who have. One of them tried losing weight on his own, lost around 60 pounds. Another lady didn't try to lose weight at all, basically told her doctor that she wanted it done, and had the surgery scheduled for three weeks later. Yes. THREE WEEKS. She pigged out the three weeks prior and was very sick after getting it done.

    At any rate, ITA that if your mom can't do the 6 month pre-op and evaluations that it's not something that she should do.

    Good luck, regardless of what she choses.
    :rambo:
  • ZinniaZinnia Registered Users Posts: 7,339
    Blue eyes and Curls,

    Is the band a permanent fixture or will it be removed in the future?
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    I feel like I'm talking to walls. I appreciate everyone's opinions. My mother is not looking for a quick fix. She knows it's not a quick fix. She is more than willing to work with the band to lose weight. She is more than willing to learn how to work with the band. She is more than willing to attend sessions, have evals, whatever. What she does not want to do is go through the same program that the guy we know did. Yes, his program was six months, but it's also what was contained within those six months. Yes, she's aware that other surgeries may be necessary. Yes, she's up for that. YES, she's done her research about what it is and what it means. The six month program was apparently a hospital policy, and she will not choose that hospital. Any hospital, however, that does NOT require any sort of counseling, sessions or anything else along those lines, is not being responsible. She is not looking to skip those sessions that the hospital she chooses may require. She understands this will be work. She HAS worked for weight loss in the past, but for reasons mentioned, she needs something else working with her. WITH her, not FOR her.
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  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Registered Users Posts: 31,259 Curl Connoisseur
    People need to lose at least 20-30 pounds before having any sort of gastric weightloss surgery, so that's probably what the 6 months is for, in addition to the counseling. You can't lose that amount of weight safely in less time, especially someone who has trouble losing weight anyway.

    Sure, some people don't lose the weight before the surgery, but that just makes their surgery more risky. The small weightloss will greatly reduce the fat around the liver area, making the surgery easier for the surgeon to do, and therefore safer for the patient.
  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Registered Users Posts: 17,898 Curl Virtuoso
    Is this procedure different than the typical "gastric bypass" surgery? How does it differ? How do you "work the band?"

  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Registered Users Posts: 31,259 Curl Connoisseur
    Typical gastric bypass surgery does just that...bypasses most of the stomach. There is a drastic re-arrangement of plumbing. With that, comes a built-in "advantage" called "dumping syndrome", where patients will puke or have pain if they eat too much fat and sugar, which keeps patients from cheating on their diets. The disadvantage to GBS is that fat soluble vitamins (ADE &K) happen to be absorbed in the section of small intestine that is bypassed and humans tend to need those vits for good health, so therefore, those vits need to be heavily supplemented, and most patients are still deficient.

    The lapband is just a physical restriction of the stomach, so stomach contents fill and empty slower. There is no plumbing re-arrangement, and therefore dumping syndrome won't happen if a patient overeats restricted foods. It's much easier to cheat a lapband (mostly by drinking calories) and that's why lapband patients lose less weight than GBS patients. But, there is a health advantage with lapband in that there isn't the awful vitamin absorption problems that all GBS patients suffer from forever, because the small intestine isn't bypassed and can still absorbe the fat soluble vitamins.

    Working the band is learning to use the band as it was intended...as a tool to help one feel full and satiated. That's really all it can do. Since it's so easily cheated, one can't lose weight if one relies solely on the physical restriction aspects of the band.
  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Registered Users Posts: 17,898 Curl Virtuoso
    OK, thanks. But how do you physically "use" the band. How do you tighten it and loosen it? Or manipulate in whatever way? Or is it a psychological "use?" I'm picturing a little drawstring that hangs out of your belly button, and you yank on it to tighten your stomach when you don't want to eat much. LOL I just can't picture what it is.

  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Registered Users Posts: 31,259 Curl Connoisseur
    OK, thanks. But how do you physically "use" the band. How do you tighten it and loosen it? Or manipulate in whatever way? Or is it a psychological "use?" I'm picturing a little drawstring that hangs out of your belly button, and you yank on it to tighten your stomach when you don't want to eat much. LOL I just can't picture what it is.


    The surgeon fills the band with saline at subsequent follow up visits. They use a syringe and needle to find the port through the skin. They can give more restriction or less. It's a delicate balance though...too much restriction and the patient gags and pukes all the time...too little and food just slips through too fast and no weight is lost. "Working the band" refers to both it's physical and psychological use...using it to keep a full sensation, not using it to cheat.
  • BlueEyesAndCurlsBlueEyesAndCurls Registered Users Posts: 18
    By 'working the band' I mean that you have to use common sense. The band restricts your intake of solid food. If you eat ice cream all day long then you aren't doing yourself a bit of good. You have to follow the band rules and eat things that are good for you....like any diet.

    And, yes, the band is permanent. Unlike gastric bypass the band can be reversed (removed) if needed. I, personally, think it is the way to go opposed to gastric bypass. This is just my opinion.

    Befrizzled, I can tell you are getting annoyed at our answers but your mom is in for a HUGE change if she gets the band. She needs all of the counseling that is required. She doesn't need to listen to her friends or me or a message board. She needs to go through everything that the hospital requires.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Registered Users Posts: 31,259 Curl Connoisseur
    And, yes, the band is permanent. Unlike gastric bypass the band can be reversed (removed) if needed. I, personally, think it is the way to go opposed to gastric bypass. This is just my opinion.

    Befrizzled, I can tell you are getting annoyed at our answers but your mom is in for a HUGE change if she gets the band. She needs all of the counseling that is required. She doesn't need to listen to her friends or me or a message board. She needs to go through everything that the hospital requires.


    I agree that the band is the way to go for people who are on the smaller side. Those that are super-obese (300+ pounds) generally have a lot more psychological issues with weight and do better with the GBS surgery that builds in an anti-cheat mechanism.

    I also agree that people need all the counseling that is required. Any weightloss surgery is a very serious endeavor. It's not just about making the decision to do it...it's about learning how to use the surgery to it's fullest potential.

    Befrizzled, insurance companies often have their own criteria for approval of weightloss surgery, and many require that the patient follows all the rules before they will pay for it. Your mom may not have a choice but to take all the counseling sessions.
  • M2LRM2LR Registered Users Posts: 8,630 Curl Connoisseur
    The disadvantage to GBS is that fat soluble vitamins (ADE &K) happen to be absorbed in the section of small intestine that is bypassed and humans tend to need those vits for good health, so therefore, those vits need to be heavily supplemented, and most patients are still deficient.

    I also read that some GBS patients have problems absorbing any kind of iron - pill, liquid, foods...so they have to have an IV of iron inserted directly into their blood stream. Iron deficiency leads to so many health problems.

    I think if it were me, the Lap Band would be the way to go...mostly because it's reversible.
    :rambo:
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    If there are no other options, she clearly has no choice but to follow the rules or not have the surgery. The reason I'm getting frustrated is because while everyone is saying that the six month program the guy we know went through is NOT a widespread policy, and each hospital has its own rules for the surgery. For whatever reason, people are only discussing my mother's surgery options in relation to the same program the other man did. As mentioned here, there ARE other options, other programs that my mother feels would be more beneficial to her. This isn't about having the surgery and sitting back and letting the band work. This is about finding the right program to make her surgery and weightloss endeavors successful. I know my mother can stick to a nutrition plan. I've seen her do it. However, those results are significantly slower because of her disability, and the doctor had said that the band would speed them up--probably not to what a normal person's results would be, but better than what she's seen. She won't have the gastric bypass surgery because of all the risks. My dad died when I was a kid, and she doesn't want to have a surgery that has a higher risk of something going wrong. At least three people in my family have had GBS, and only one of them had some success without complications.

    Now, if my brother decided to have the surgery, I would feel that HE would need a longer pre-op program than my mother would, because he is much less educated on any of it. This isn't about a blanket solution. This is about finding the program that is best suited to the patient.
    Under construction.
  • M2LRM2LR Registered Users Posts: 8,630 Curl Connoisseur
    Befrizzled wrote:
    If there are no other options, she clearly has no choice but to follow the rules or not have the surgery. The reason I'm getting frustrated is because while everyone is saying that the six month program the guy we know went through is NOT a widespread policy, and each hospital has its own rules for the surgery. For whatever reason, people are only discussing my mother's surgery options in relation to the same program the other man did. As mentioned here, there ARE other options, other programs that my mother feels would be more beneficial to her. This isn't about having the surgery and sitting back and letting the band work. This is about finding the right program to make her surgery and weightloss endeavors successful. I know my mother can stick to a nutrition plan. I've seen her do it. However, those results are significantly slower because of her disability, and the doctor had said that the band would speed them up--probably not to what a normal person's results would be, but better than what she's seen. She won't have the gastric bypass surgery because of all the risks. My dad died when I was a kid, and she doesn't want to have a surgery that has a higher risk of something going wrong. At least three people in my family have had GBS, and only one of them had some success without complications.

    Now, if my brother decided to have the surgery, I would feel that HE would need a longer pre-op program than my mother would, because he is much less educated on any of it. This isn't about a blanket solution. This is about finding the program that is best suited to the patient.

    Your OP was about how to get around the 6 month pre-op program. I thought that's what we were addressing. When other options were mentioned, youd' stated that your mom has pretty much all ready tried those things.

    If there are other programs or "rules" that she must follow that don't have a path to surgery, I suggest she try those.

    GL.
    :rambo:
  • BefrizzledBefrizzled Registered Users Posts: 3,854
    M2LR & Co. wrote:
    Befrizzled wrote:
    If there are no other options, she clearly has no choice but to follow the rules or not have the surgery. The reason I'm getting frustrated is because while everyone is saying that the six month program the guy we know went through is NOT a widespread policy, and each hospital has its own rules for the surgery. For whatever reason, people are only discussing my mother's surgery options in relation to the same program the other man did. As mentioned here, there ARE other options, other programs that my mother feels would be more beneficial to her. This isn't about having the surgery and sitting back and letting the band work. This is about finding the right program to make her surgery and weightloss endeavors successful. I know my mother can stick to a nutrition plan. I've seen her do it. However, those results are significantly slower because of her disability, and the doctor had said that the band would speed them up--probably not to what a normal person's results would be, but better than what she's seen. She won't have the gastric bypass surgery because of all the risks. My dad died when I was a kid, and she doesn't want to have a surgery that has a higher risk of something going wrong. At least three people in my family have had GBS, and only one of them had some success without complications.

    Now, if my brother decided to have the surgery, I would feel that HE would need a longer pre-op program than my mother would, because he is much less educated on any of it. This isn't about a blanket solution. This is about finding the program that is best suited to the patient.

    Your OP was about how to get around the 6 month pre-op program. I thought that's what we were addressing. When other options were mentioned, youd' stated that your mom has pretty much all ready tried those things.

    If there are other programs or "rules" that she must follow that don't have a path to surgery, I suggest she try those.

    GL.

    My OP also asked if the 6 month program was a hospital policy or a widespread surgery policy. Apparently, it is a policy specific to that hospital, meaning that there are other programs out there that would probably be more succesful for her.

    What other options have people mentioned outside of surgery, other than just asserting that she shouldn't have it?

    I respect that you think that she should stay off programs with a path to surgery. If you can suggest something that would be more successful for her, please do.
    Under construction.

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