Saw the midwife today

medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
The baby is head down, but sunny side up. I still have some time for the baby to flip over. But that might explain why I feels so much of the baby's movement. That examination hurt, btw. At one point she pressed near my pubic bone and I nearly flew off the table. I think I was in the middle of a Braxton Hicks contraction.

My midwife doesn't recommend EPO vaginally because she feels you can never be sure of how the capsules are manufactured. She herself got a very bad infection of the chorionic membrane from inserting the capsules. So, I will only do EPO by mouth starting at 37 weeks.

I was also informed that due advanced maternal age (37), the OB's are now offering bi-weekly ultrasounds starting at 32 weeks. It's a controversial move and the midwives are not happy about it. But the pressure is on them to at least offer the BPPs (which are usually done past the 40-week mark). According to some doctors, things deteriorate much faster and are more likely to go wrong in an older mom even before she even reaches her due date. I don't know if that's just an OB scare tactic or what but that was enough to give me pause. I turned them down on the bi-weekly ultrasounds and I might just do one at 37 weeks to make sure everything is okay.

Comments

  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    What do you mean by sunny side up?
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • PixieCurlPixieCurl Posts: 5,656Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    What do you mean by sunny side up?

    The baby is facing medussa's front - or facing "up" if medussa was lying on her back. He/she should be face-down, or facing medussa's back.
    Faith, 3Aish redhead
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  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    When your baby in utero is head-down but facing your abdomen, he's said to be in the occiput posterior (OP) position. The term refers to the fact that the baby's occipital bone (the back of the skull) is in the posterior (or back) of your pelvis. You may also hear this position referred to as "face-up" or "sunny-side up."

    If this baby doesn't turn over in the next 7 weeks, I'm fucked. :o
  • deezee02deezee02 Posts: 1,509Registered Users
    Steven was head down the whole time, but he often flipped from front to back...

    I remember when he finally moved for the last time, it looked like a little wave in my belly, i think i was about 37 weeks or so...yeah it must have been b/c we ways got great face and profile shots and his legs were always spread during US
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  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    Ah! Thanks, medussa and pixie. That is the position common to anterior placentas like I have, right?
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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    534Pm5.png





  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    Ah! Thanks, medussa and pixie. That is the position common to anterior placentas like I have, right?


    Hmm. I'm not sure. Maybe Redcatwaves knows. She mentioned having an anterior placenta with at least one of her pregnancies.
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    I forgot to ask... I also have no idea what EPO is. I don't know the labour language yet....
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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    534Pm5.png





  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Evening Primrose Oil.
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    definitely get that baby moving momma! Homeopathic Pulsatill is great for malpositioning. I'm sure you can ask your midwife. I could handle my contractions with Ian just by pausing until he flipped sunny side up. Then it felt like lightning bolts up and down my back with no respite because he was riding my tailbone out.
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    medussa wrote:
    Evening Primrose Oil.

    What does it do for you? (so many questions, I know...)
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


    .png


    534Pm5.png





  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    medussa wrote:
    Evening Primrose Oil.

    What does it do for you? (so many questions, I know...)

    It can soften the cervix
    To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
    I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

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  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users Curl Neophyte
    medussa wrote:
    When your baby in utero is head-down but facing your abdomen, he's said to be in the occiput posterior (OP) position. The term refers to the fact that the baby's occipital bone (the back of the skull) is in the posterior (or back) of your pelvis. You may also hear this position referred to as "face-up" or "sunny-side up."

    If this baby doesn't turn over in the next 7 weeks, I'm &%$@#!. :o
    :lol:
    Too late for that...
    
    tongue.gif
    And as for the other...I think it's another scare/cya tactic...
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,060 Administrator
    definitely get that baby moving momma! Homeopathic Pulsatill is great for malpositioning. I'm sure you can ask your midwife. I could handle my contractions with Ian just by pausing until he flipped sunny side up. Then it felt like lightning bolts up and down my back with no respite because he was riding my tailbone out.


    I had the same issue. lots of Cat/Cows, 2 chiropractic adjustments, and 2 doses of Pulsatill (dose #1 was at 40 weeks. dose #2 was an hour before he was out). He would just flip flop in and out of position. That last dose of Pulsatill did the trick.

    Another method I've heard of is to use a rozebo scarf to lift and rotate the hips beteween contractions when in active labor.
  • curlyninercurlyniner Posts: 130Registered Users
    Same thing here. She was sunny side up from start (1cm) to complete(10cm) - and that was before I even got to the hospital. Thank goodness labor only lasted a few hours. I felt for months afterward that I had broken bones in my back and tailbone.

    I only realized maybe a few months ago that that's NOT what everyone's contractions feel like. For the last couple of years I thought I was the biggest wussy in the world because I couldn't 'breathe through the contractions'. :?

    *sending baby flipping vibes your way* :wink:
    "Things are exactly as they should be, all evidence to the contrary."

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  • internetchickinternetchick Posts: 6,191Registered Users
    My first was sunny side up and the stubborn little turd didn't even turn going down the birth canal. Long labor, lots of back labor. The Bradley method recommended pelvic tilts to encourage the baby to turn.
  • cosmicflycosmicfly Posts: 1,814Registered Users
    medussa wrote:
    When your baby in utero is head-down but facing your abdomen, he's said to be in the occiput posterior (OP) position. The term refers to the fact that the baby's occipital bone (the back of the skull) is in the posterior (or back) of your pelvis. You may also hear this position referred to as "face-up" or "sunny-side up."

    If this baby doesn't turn over in the next 7 weeks, I'm &%$@#!. :o

    The midwife told me Maya spun completely around when I was in labor. What a little PITA! It did not feel good!

    ETA: she was also transverse until about 34 weeks. I was freaking, biut she turned.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Um....this was a midwife? And she doesn't know that babies are SUPPOSED to be posterior until full-term? Honestly...don't worry about it. It's NORMAL for babies to be in any presentation at 33 weeks. Head down is the only thing to even be concerned with, and your's is, so stop worrying.

    I don't think EPO will do anything when taken orally. The digestive system will just treat it as a fat and it'll be gone way before it gets anywhere near the cervix.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    My midwife doesn't recommend EPO vaginally because she feels you can never be sure of how the capsules are manufactured. She herself got a very bad infection of the chorionic membrane from inserting the capsules. So, I will only do EPO by mouth starting at 37 weeks.

    I was also informed that due advanced maternal age (37), the OB's are now offering bi-weekly ultrasounds starting at 32 weeks. It's a controversial move and the midwives are not happy about it. But the pressure is on them to at least offer the BPPs (which are usually done past the 40-week mark). According to some doctors, things deteriorate much faster and are more likely to go wrong in an older mom even before she even reaches her due date. I don't know if that's just an OB scare tactic or what but that was enough to give me pause. I turned them down on the bi-weekly ultrasounds and I might just do one at 37 weeks to make sure everything is okay.


    The automatic bio-physical profiles sound like an OB scare tactic to me...probably thought up by their lawyers. Lawyers are practicing obstetrics these days.

    How does she know it was the EPO that gave her chorioamnionitis? I had chorio after my first delivery. I was sick as hell. I hadn't inserted any EPO, but I did have several vaginal exams in labor after my water broke (they wanted to do more than several...that was my posterior baby and they tried to line up all the med students and let them all have a feel, but I was a party pooper and said "no"...or was it "HELL NO"? Can't remember. :wink:)

    The way to avoid chorio is to not put anything in the vagina after rupture of membranes...nothing...and that includes doctor/nurse/midwife hands or speculums. Even if they SAY it's a "sterile" exam...it's still probably going to introduce infection because it reverses the natural flow of the vagina.

    I don't think Occiput Posterior (OP) presentation is more common with anterior implanted placentas. OP is more likely with fetuses who aren't at term yet, so it's seen more in labors that are induced because the baby simply hasn't gotten into it's position for birth yet. OP is also a lifestyle issue. Women who spend a lot of time in recliners at the end of their pregnancies have more OP babies. One of the most productive ways to get a baby out of OP is to do something very simple...wash your kitchen floor on your hands and knees. The baby's back is heavier than it's front, so when mom spends time on her hands-and-knees, gravity will pull the back down. The action of washing the floor also opens up the pelvis and enables baby to move. Yoga positions can move an OP also, and some swear by chiropractice adjustments...but why not get your floor clean at the same time? Seems more practical to me. ;)

    Here's a FABULOUS article on OP. The author midwife offers some suggestions for manually turning an OP internally. I've heard from other midwives that it works pretty well also. But...all of these things aren't all that important til labor is imminant. Just wash your floor a couple times at week 38 onward...and stay out of recliners. Lie on your side on the couch instead.

    http://gentlebirth.org/archives/postrppr.html
  • medussamedussa Posts: 12,993Registered Users
    Um....this was a midwife? And she doesn't know that babies are SUPPOSED to be posterior until full-term?

    :lol: She told me OP was fine; that there was lots of time for the baby to flip over and that they usually do.
    OP is also a lifestyle issue. Women who spend a lot of time in recliners at the end of their pregnancies have more OP babies. One of the most productive ways to get a baby out of OP is to do something very simple...wash your kitchen floor on your hands and knees. The baby's back is heavier than it's front, so when mom spends time on her hands-and-knees, gravity will pull the back down. The action of washing the floor also opens up the pelvis and enables baby to move. Yoga positions can move an OP also, and some swear by chiropractice adjustments...but why not get your floor clean at the same time? Seems more practical to me.

    Just wash your floor a couple times at week 38 onward...and stay out of recliners. Lie on your side on the couch instead.

    Holy crap! You busted me!!! Yes, I sit in a recliner when I'm not running around with my toddler. :lol: I love my recliner. I'd sleep in it every night if I could. I can't believe you called that one. Too funny.

    I don't do floors, but I just might for this baby.
  • curlyninercurlyniner Posts: 130Registered Users
    One of the most productive ways to get a baby out of OP is to do something very simple...wash your kitchen floor on your hands and knees.

    Dear God, please don't let my husband see this. :shock:
    "Things are exactly as they should be, all evidence to the contrary."

    password = niner

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  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Dear God, please don't let my husband see this.


    Heh...I'll never tell!
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I don't do floors, but I just might for this baby.


    Truth be told, I don't do floors either, especially not on my hands and knees. I have a cleaning lady ;), but I did wash my floor a couple of times with the last baby, that's how desparate I was.

    Being as I had a history of OP (with my first baby...caused my first c-sec), I did spend a lot of time on hands-and-knees with the rest of my babies, hoping never to have another OP. I didn't have another one, thank goodness. My last baby was in ROA though...right occiput anterior, which is an OK presentation for labor/birth, but is more likely to turn OP than an LOA baby is (ROA babies have a longer turn to make to get into the birth canal, because they spin counter-clockwise)...and no matter what I did, he would not budge out of that position until the very moment of birth when, like a key in a lock, I felt his head make the complete turn and come down all the way to crowning in one big push.

    Can you tell I've spent a lot of time studying birth positions and the mechanics of birth? I was pretty much obsessed with it when planning my homebirth.

    Here's a handy-dandy little primer on fetal presentations:

    http://tinyurl.com/2ay69w

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