How to bring back my curls?

mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
when i was a little **** i had some pretty curly hair.

after middle school, the stages of caring too much about my hair, i combed my hair to the side every day, for two years.

now, it's not curling again. i've cut my hair about 1-1.5 inches (i'm a dude), how can i make sure my 85% straight 15% wavy hair will grow back curly? going for long hair.

thanks guys. i'm hoping it's not impossible, i don't think my follicles suddenly became accustomed for straight hair.

Comments

  • TheSpicyKrautTheSpicyKraut Registered Users Posts: 4
    Actually, your hair CAN change over your life time.

    Here's an interesting tidbit about it: A Hair Mystery: Curly Hair Gone Straight : NPR

    However, IF your changes aren't due to genetics, it may be you're not being as gentle as you could be with your hair. Are you using sulfate-free cleansers? Is your hair exposed to a lot of sun and wind? Do you rub your hair with a towel when drying? These are all things that could weaken your hair and natural curl.
    2a (some 2b in back), dense, medium texture, normal porosity and elasticity, above chin (CG since March 2015)
    Low Poo: SheaMoisture Raw Shea Butter Moisture Rentention
    Co-wash/R O: Tresemme Naturals
    Stylers: Fruit of the Earth 100% Aloe Vera Gel OR LA Looks Sports Gel
    Once per month: deep condition or protein treatment (depending on needs) AND Kinky Curly Come Clean to remove product build-up


    [/FONT]
  • mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
    Actually, I remember that my shampoo has alcohol, somewhere I read that it's bad.

    Could you tell me some other stuff I need to keep curly hair nice and... I don't know. Curly?

    Thanks
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    Hi MT,

    Welcome to nc.com. It's hard to tell from you original post how long your hair is. It is also fairly common for curl texture to change with change in length. When I had a short pixie cut, my hair had a tendency to be straight and stick to my head. Parts of my hair that were longer, were kind of 2b-2c. Then when I grew it out to chin length it became quite curly in the 3a range. Now that it is past my shoulders it tends to be more 2c again. Your own hair might have a different way of behaving as it grows out.

    However, to keep your hair healthy (and therefore curly :)), it is more important to know about its other properties such as:
    - texture: fine/medium/coarse
    - porosity: (How porous your hair strands are) There is a test where you put some hair in a cup of water and wait to see how long it takes to sink, but I never quite understood it. Usually hair is low porosity, but often hair that has been chemically treated (relaxers/coloring) or gone through heavy heat damage is high porosity.
    - density: whether you have a lot of hair, or not.

    You would also want to know how your hair reacts to moisture and protein. Most curly hair needs both, but how much and how often is an individual thing, that is related to your hair properties, but also your individual situation.

    If you can tell us more about your hair properties we might be able to help with product and technique suggestions. But you can also look into getting a hair analysis by Goosefootprints, which is available on Etsy. I think it's $35, and she will tell you hair properties and make some product and technique recommendations based on that. The lady who does the hair analysis has a really great blog too: Sciency Hair Blog

    But to get your started, a big part of the CG method (we can call it Curly Guy for you :)) is to avoid sulfates and non-water-soluable silicones (as well as alcohol as you noticed) as these can be damaging to your curls.
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
    bomega wrote: »
    Hi MT,

    Welcome to nc.com. It's hard to tell from you original post how long your hair is. It is also fairly common for curl texture to change with change in length. When I had a short pixie cut, my hair had a tendency to be straight and stick to my head. Parts of my hair that were longer, were kind of 2b-2c. Then when I grew it out to chin length it became quite curly in the 3a range. Now that it is past my shoulders it tends to be more 2c again. Your own hair might have a different way of behaving as it grows out.

    However, to keep your hair healthy (and therefore curly :)), it is more important to know about its other properties such as:
    - texture: fine/medium/coarse
    - porosity: (How porous your hair strands are) There is a test where you put some hair in a cup of water and wait to see how long it takes to sink, but I never quite understood it. Usually hair is low porosity, but often hair that has been chemically treated (relaxers/coloring) or gone through heavy heat damage is high porosity.
    - density: whether you have a lot of hair, or not.

    You would also want to know how your hair reacts to moisture and protein. Most curly hair needs both, but how much and how often is an individual thing, that is related to your hair properties, but also your individual situation.

    If you can tell us more about your hair properties we might be able to help with product and technique suggestions. But you can also look into getting a hair analysis by Goosefootprints, which is available on Etsy. I think it's $35, and she will tell you hair properties and make some product and technique recommendations based on that. The lady who does the hair analysis has a really great blog too: Sciency Hair Blog

    But to get your started, a big part of the CG method (we can call it Curly Guy for you :)) is to avoid sulfates and non-water-soluable silicones (as well as alcohol as you noticed) as these can be damaging to your curls.
    Hi bomega, thanks for the info!

    I have medium hair, and a low porosity, as my hair didn't sink in water (by the way, i only used one single hair for the porosity test)

    I come from Indian descent, and right now, my hair looks quite dry and rough, but I can run my fingers through it easily. I used to always run my fingers through it, which is what I suspect caused the straightness over the years, but it could be because my hair is now short, compared to when I was rocking a wavy medium length a few months back.

    I've recently been leaving my hair alone and making sure I don't touch it, expecting it might curl up. It's actually become a tad bit wavy because of this habit, compared to when I cut it, it was super straight. However, it might be because I conditioned it this morning. I used to condition it and not wash it out completely, because I didn't know how to use conditioner, but today I conditoned, completely washed it out, and it felt soft, which I was really happy with.

    The length is maybe 3 to 4 inches at the back, but it's around 1 or 2 inches at the front. Don't worry, it doesn't look as bad as it sounds!

    Thanks! What shampoo and conditioner should I use? I doubt my local pharmacy sells whatever you recommend me, so what are the ingredients I should always avoid?

    Appreciate the help!
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    I'm not sure I can help as my hair is fine and I also live in a region where weather patterns are different than the rest of the country. You might want to start my learning about the CG method for you hair. I learned just by reading articles here on nc.com, but for the life of me I can't find any of them any more. You can also read the Curly Girl Handbook by Lorraine Massey, which is how many people learned about it. You might be able to get it from the library. Here you can learn about the basic principles and techniques which you may find helpful. I think most people don't do everything, but figure out what works for them.

    Some of the basic ideas:
    1) Avoid sulfate shampoos and non-water-soluable silicones. Sulfate shampoos are known to be very drying to the hair, and silicones coat the hair, preventing mositure from getting into the hair strand, and in turn can only be removed by harsh sulfates. As as side note, you will probably find that you will need to clarify at regular intervals (mine needs it about every 3-4 weeks.) It is ok to use sulfate to clarify at that time, but there are also clarifying shampoos that use other detergents that may be gentler on the hair.
    Sciency Hair Blog article about identifying different silicones. And here is one about how to remove the non-water-soluable ones. (However, although she says that coco-betaine *might* remove silicones, I did not find it to be the case.)

    2) Consider drying your hair with a t-shirt rather than terry cloth towel. This will help prevent frizz and achieve clumping.

    3) Look for a the balance between moisture and protein that your hair needs. It sounds like you are figuring out your hair desperately needs moisture. You might benefit from co-washing (cleaning hair with conditioner only) and low-pooing (shampoo that doesn't contain sulfate) only ones a week.

    4) Consider the weather to prevent frizz and damaged. In most parts of the country dew points are high in the summer, which promotes frizz, but low in the winter which causes dryness. This is a personal thing you have to figure out how to work with your hair.

    As for product recommendations, the Rockyn Curls blog and youtube videos is really great. She has coarse hair so her techniques and products may be helpful to you, and she has a lot of product suggestions that are affordable and easy to find. (She also gives lots of suggestions for other hair types than her own, so its really helpful.)

    I already mentioned the Sciency Hair Blog above. It is such a great resource. She has a list of her favorites products and techniques on her blog

    I used Live Curly Live Free when I was starting out.

    In my experience, when I started avoiding silicones, my hair started immediately doing better, I think back then I settled into using Giovanni shampoo/conditioner. The Balance 50:50 is a good one. I used the Magnetic line for a long time. The Tea Tree is good for clarifying, but it can be drying using it daily. I also used the Shea Moisture Coconut-Hibiscus line for a while, back when my hair used love silk protein. These might be available at your local pharmacy. I think they can be found at Target.

    Finally, since you mentioned you are of Indian descent, I want to say, that using henna and amla has been a game changer for my hair. I used to struggle with dry hair, lots of breakage, and frizz...all the time. After starting henna...just great hair. I actually started this to color my hair, so you might want to look into cassia+amla. Cassia is known to be conditioning without the red color deposit and the amla is curl enhancing. In fact you could try just amla only. You might need to follow with an oil treatment - I use seseme oil after my washing out henna/amla (applying oil to wet hair). Then wash with my regular shampoo/condtioner the next day, and it is just excellent. Your parents might think this is old-fashioned, but I'm telling you its the hot new thing here in natural hair care.

    ETA: After all that, just wanted to add one more thing. Don't worry too much about having permanently straightened your hair from combing/running your hands through it. That isn't enough to do permanent damage. Just do what your hair needs, and have some patience. Your curls will come back.
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
    bomega wrote: »
    I'm not sure I can help as my hair is fine and I also live in a region where weather patterns are different than the rest of the country. You might want to start my learning about the CG method for you hair. I learned just by reading articles here on nc.com, but for the life of me I can't find any of them any more. You can also read the Curly Girl Handbook by Lorraine Massey, which is how many people learned about it. You might be able to get it from the library. Here you can learn about the basic principles and techniques which you may find helpful. I think most people don't do everything, but figure out what works for them.

    Some of the basic ideas:
    1) Avoid sulfate shampoos and non-water-soluable silicones. Sulfate shampoos are known to be very drying to the hair, and silicones coat the hair, preventing mositure from getting into the hair strand, and in turn can only be removed by harsh sulfates. As as side note, you will probably find that you will need to clarify at regular intervals (mine needs it about every 3-4 weeks.) It is ok to use sulfate to clarify at that time, but there are also clarifying shampoos that use other detergents that may be gentler on the hair.
    Sciency Hair Blog article about identifying different silicones. And here is one about how to remove the non-water-soluable ones. (However, although she says that coco-betaine *might* remove silicones, I did not find it to be the case.)

    2) Consider drying your hair with a t-shirt rather than terry cloth towel. This will help prevent frizz and achieve clumping.

    3) Look for a the balance between moisture and protein that your hair needs. It sounds like you are figuring out your hair desperately needs moisture. You might benefit from co-washing (cleaning hair with conditioner only) and low-pooing (shampoo that doesn't contain sulfate) only ones a week.

    4) Consider the weather to prevent frizz and damaged. In most parts of the country dew points are high in the summer, which promotes frizz, but low in the winter which causes dryness. This is a personal thing you have to figure out how to work with your hair.

    As for product recommendations, the Rockyn Curls blog and youtube videos is really great. She has coarse hair so her techniques and products may be helpful to you, and she has a lot of product suggestions that are affordable and easy to find. (She also gives lots of suggestions for other hair types than her own, so its really helpful.)

    I already mentioned the Sciency Hair Blog above. It is such a great resource. She has a list of her favorites products and techniques on her blog

    I used Live Curly Live Free when I was starting out.

    In my experience, when I started avoiding silicones, my hair started immediately doing better, I think back then I settled into using Giovanni shampoo/conditioner. The Balance 50:50 is a good one. I used the Magnetic line for a long time. The Tea Tree is good for clarifying, but it can be drying using it daily. I also used the Shea Moisture Coconut-Hibiscus line for a while, back when my hair used love silk protein. These might be available at your local pharmacy. I think they can be found at Target.

    Finally, since you mentioned you are of Indian descent, I want to say, that using henna and amla has been a game changer for my hair. I used to struggle with dry hair, lots of breakage, and frizz...all the time. After starting henna...just great hair. I actually started this to color my hair, so you might want to look into cassia+amla. Cassia is known to be conditioning without the red color deposit and the amla is curl enhancing. In fact you could try just amla only. You might need to follow with an oil treatment - I use seseme oil after my washing out henna/amla (applying oil to wet hair). Then wash with my regular shampoo/condtioner the next day, and it is just excellent. Your parents might think this is old-fashioned, but I'm telling you its the hot new thing here in natural hair care.

    ETA: After all that, just wanted to add one more thing. Don't worry too much about having permanently straightened your hair from combing/running your hands through it. That isn't enough to do permanent damage. Just do what your hair needs, and have some patience. Your curls will come back.
    Thanks bomega!

    I was kind of going for tight curls and short sides, which is obviously up to follicles, but your info was really helpful! I'll try the Curly Guy method, and buy some new conditioner over the weekend, just to get rid of this straight hair.

    One more question though, I don't remember what it was like to have curly hair since I was younger, but if my curls ever do come back, should I be able to run my fingers through it? Not that I need to or anything, but the rarity of waking up with a curl on my head is a difficult thing to maintain, since it goes away if I finger comb it. I know that people like product, and I don't have anything against it, but I don't enjoy having to coat my hair in something every day just to keep it curly, I'd rather just shower and go, so if I follow the massive amount of useful info you've given me (thanks!), should it naturally curl?

    My dad has some nice curls, and he told me that his mom used to scrunch his hair with the classic Indian grandparent oil treatment, but I doubt that's why he has curls at age 50. My mom has wavy hair, however VERY loose, wavy hair, there is a change of direction maybe every 2 inches, and she has shoulder length hair, even after straightening it, it still waves itself like that. Don't follicles base themselves off our mother's hair? So I'm skeptical about my curls returning.

    I'll mention the state of my hair nowadays. I wear hats quite often, so would that do anything bad? I live in humid Singapore, so it's pretty hot here, however my hair isn't super dry, just in need of a little moisture, however it's pretty soft, and my hair doesn't frizz a bit, which is a little unsettling, since I've heard that frizz is a problem that only curly heads face.

    My shower routine is waking up, showering in warm water, and going. I only started using conditioner yesterday and this morning, and I have to say sulfate and silicone really suck! Conditioner usually gives my hair a greasy feeling, and it becomes bigger on my head. It's just dry when my hair has dried, much worse than using only water.

    I'm starting to suspect that it's my follicles, as I heard that over time, they can change, like body cells die and reproduce, so my curly follicles might've left the building!

    Thanks bomega! I'll check out the conditioners and shampoos which are sulfate, alcohol and silicone free.
  • mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
    Update: I took off a hat I was wearing for a while, and I noticed that my hair becomes slightly wavy! Good start, it also looks a little more moisturized! I looked in the mirror however, and I could see there were individuals hairs trying to stick up, away from the direction that my hair lays, some were straight, but others were somewhat curly, like if they grew longer, they would be curly. Does this mean anything?
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    Thanks bomega!

    I was kind of going for tight curls and short sides, which is obviously up to follicles, but your info was really helpful! I'll try the Curly Guy method, and buy some new conditioner over the weekend, just to get rid of this straight hair.
    Yeah, since it seems you don't have 3c/type 4 curls it looks like this won't happen. I would check some of those resource I gave you above; Many of the product suggestions are from multinational companies so you would probably be able to find them. But also they talk about what ingredients to avoid (or look for) so you might be able to find something produced in your country that meets the requirements. You are going to have to get good at reading the tiny print on ingredients lists from now on. ;)
    One more question though, I don't remember what it was like to have curly hair since I was younger, but if my curls ever do come back, should I be able to run my fingers through it? Not that I need to or anything, but the rarity of waking up with a curl on my head is a difficult thing to maintain, since it goes away if I finger comb it. I know that people like product, and I don't have anything against it, but I don't enjoy having to coat my hair in something every day just to keep it curly, I'd rather just shower and go, so if I follow the massive amount of useful info you've given me (thanks!), should it naturally curl?
    Yeah, I feel the same way in that I don't like a product-y feel to my hair. There are people who can wake up and get second-day hair, but that often takes product. Using a t-shirt for your hair, pat drying it (rather than rubbing the towel vigorously), and also using a silk/satin pillowcase might help also. However, running your fingers through your hair will probably stretch the curl and break up clumps no matter what. You might be able to get away without using styling product once your hair gets caught up with whatever it needs to feel good. I only shampoo and rinse-out condition my hair, and I have a pretty good everyday look for my hair. I have found that improving the condition of my hair made it so I need less effort to look good. That improvement for me came from first giving up sulfates & silicones, then the next breakthrough was from henna/amla. Since doing henna/amla, I have not needed styling product to avoid major frizz or get some curl definition or get clumping. However, it isn't reliably great-looking hair (like if I wanted to dress up for a party or something.) I think to have that, it takes a little more, which is what I'm looking into now for myself. But there is a guy here on nc.com who only washes his hair once a week, but refreshes it daily with a spritz made by adding a little conditioner to a water bottle full of water. And while he has a little frizz, he has great curl definition and clumps. Really, you will just have to find out.
    My dad has some nice curls, and he told me that his mom used to scrunch his hair with the classic Indian grandparent oil treatment, but I doubt that's why he has curls at age 50. My mom has wavy hair, however VERY loose, wavy hair, there is a change of direction maybe every 2 inches, and she has shoulder length hair, even after straightening it, it still waves itself like that. Don't follicles base themselves off our mother's hair? So I'm skeptical about my curls returning.
    I really think you need to find out more about that grandparent oil. Those ayurvedic solutions may just be what your hair needs, and since you live in Singapore, it is probably easier for you to find good quality products. I think a lot of modern products have made us get away from traditional solutions that work and are healthier. I cannot say enough good things about amla, and the internet is full of testimonials of amla making curls pop instantly (but of course YMMV.)

    Curly hair gene comes from both parents, but it isn't just dominant/recessive. Here is an interesting article that explains the genetics of curly hair, but I think it might still be more complicated than this, because my father has curly hair, and my mother has straight hair, me and my two siblings each have different hair textures. And I know a woman who came from a family of straight haired people and she has massive amounts of 3c curls. Its hard to say what your hair will do as it grows out, but remember its your hair, so all you can do is love it and accept it as it is.
    I'll mention the state of my hair nowadays. I wear hats quite often, so would that do anything bad? I live in humid Singapore, so it's pretty hot here, however my hair isn't super dry, just in need of a little moisture, however it's pretty soft, and my hair doesn't frizz a bit, which is a little unsettling, since I've heard that frizz is a problem that only curly heads face.
    Well, wearing hats isn't bad, especially if you need it to keep the sun out of your face. But it does cause "hat head" so that means flattening curls. But it isn't a permanent type of thing. You wash your hair and it comes back. There are some techniques that can enhance curl. Squish-to-condish comes to mind. The newbie threads cover all of these pretty well.
    My shower routine is waking up, showering in warm water, and going. I only started using conditioner yesterday and this morning, and I have to say sulfate and silicone really suck! Conditioner usually gives my hair a greasy feeling, and it becomes bigger on my head. It's just dry when my hair has dried, much worse than using only water.
    Some conditioner leaves a greasy feel. This is where you have to experiment a little.
    I'm starting to suspect that it's my follicles, as I heard that over time, they can change, like body cells die and reproduce, so my curly follicles might've left the building!
    This is possible. I've heard it with women that puberty often brings on curly hair. Maybe the opposite can happen. But I still think you should give your hair a chance. Growing it out might very well bring on the curl. You just have to wait and see. But again, since it's your hair, all you can do is accept it for what it is, whatever that is.
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    Update: I took off a hat I was wearing for a while, and I noticed that my hair becomes slightly wavy! Good start, it also looks a little more moisturized! I looked in the mirror however, and I could see there were individuals hairs trying to stick up, away from the direction that my hair lays, some were straight, but others were somewhat curly, like if they grew longer, they would be curly. Does this mean anything?
    I don't know if hair trying to stick up means anything. The hat improving your wave does sound like you need to regularly moisturize. Curly hair going straight from damage is a thing. It does take time and consistency to recover from, but it happens. Since you live in a humid area, you have an advantage. Maybe look for deep treatments with humectents (glycerin, agave, honey, are common humectent ingredients.)
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    You know, I just remembered hearing about a natural treatment where you blend up fresh amla, yogurt, methi powder and curly leaves. Blend it up smooth, then apply for an hour and wash out. Can you get fresh amla in Singapore? If you can, this might be nice to try. (The lady I buy my powder from told me about it, too, but somehow it seems less fun without it being fresh.)
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • mashertrashermashertrasher Registered Users Posts: 7
    I think the main thing I've learned is that my hair is severely dry and in need of moisture. I'm definitely gonna be avoiding silicone and sulfate shampoos, hopefully they won't have alcohol either. The amla sounds really good for me too.

    If you've seen Casey Neistat's vlogs, you can see he has some nice curls. I think that's the curliest my hair can be, but maybe growing it out can help. I noticed that when I was growing it out, I had a wave, despite my hair being dry.

    How would I use the amla? I don't really have an hour everyday or even once a week to do the yogurt, amla, leaves and powder treatment, so I probably can't manage to do it. When I google amla, it comes up as Indian Gooseberry, is this the same thing?

    Also, does amla give a reddish colour, or any colour for that matter? Because if I show up at school with colour in my hair, I'll probably get eaten alive.

    Say my hair becomes curly again, after I follow these steps. How would I maintain it throughout the day?

    Thanks
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    I just checked out those Casey Neistat youtube videos (I had never heard of him, but I'm not a huge consumer of the internet). I like his attitude on life. He looks like his curls are around 2b or 2c, but wearing the hat crushes them. It also looks like he uses some sort of hair gel, pomade, or some other styler. This article on nc.com has a list of humectants close to the bottom. If you want to try hair gel, your hair might benefit from using one with humectants in them, as they will draw moisture from the air into your hair and possible help it rehydrate. It lists hydrolyzed silk protein as a humectant. Decades ago, my hair use to *love* silk protein. I know Shea Moisture Coconut Hibiscus line has silk protein in it. If you can get it, I think these are worth a shot. I used to use the shampoo, conditioner, and then the leave-in conditioner (the Curl and Style Milk) as a styler. Looks like they have a gel (the Curling Gel Souffle) that might work for you too.

    Yeah, amla is the same as Indian Gooseberry. To do a basic amla treatment, mix some amla powder with water to make a thin paste. Apply it to the hair (dry hair is fine), leave it on for about 20 minutes, then rinse out. Then apply oil to wet hair making sure its pretty coated (I use seseme oil) and leave that on over night. Shampoo/condition the next day as usual. Since your hair is short, it can't be too much of a production (my hair is past my shoulders, it takes me another 20 minutes just to separate my hair and apply it.) For your hair, 1 tablespoon of powder should be more than enough for an application. Amla by itself will not change your hair color at all. If you decide you like it, you can experiment with a Cassia/Amla mix, which also will not change your hair color, but cassia is known to have some deep conditioning properties. I can understand not wanting to do it too often, but really it's your hair that would get to decide. I do my henna/amla about every 2 weeks, which is about as often as it needs. You might be able to get away with every month or even less. Also, some people make a hair rinse out of amla, where they boil the powder, then strain, discarding the powder, and then apply the "tea" to their hair. Sometimes the leave in, sometimes they wash out after some time. I've never done this though.

    If your hair becomes curly again, don't touch it...just leave it alone throughout the day and let everyone around you be jealous of your curls. ;)
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order
  • bomegabomega Registered Users Posts: 1,355 Curl Virtuoso
    Hi, I was reading on the Sciency Hair Blog today, and saw a couple of posts you might find helpful:

    1) Moisturizing Low Porosity Hair - I come back to this one a lot to help my low porosity hair.

    2) Film Forming Humectants - What They Are and Why You Need Them - Linked in the above article, I think this explains a lot more than the nc.com article I gave you earlier.

    3) Glycerin and Humidity - More than you ever wanted to know about glycerin. She actually is trying to explain why someone going through bitter, cold, dry, winter needs to avoid it. But it might explain how it can help you in the tropical humidity of Singapore while you are trying to get caught up with moisture/hydration.

    4) Protein 101 - Lots of Basic Information About Using Protein in Hair Products - For all this talk about moisturizing, its possible that your hair needs protein (or will at some point in the future.) This article has all the basics.
    The Sciency Hair Blog is such a great resource because she really explains everything about a subject, and so you can adapt the information to your situation. She also gives examples and product recommendations to get your started. I actually have never use a specific product recommendation she makes but I find it helpful that she lists them because I can still apply that information some how. I think for you since you don't live in the US, it might help to know about this so you can find locally-manufactured products that could work for you.

    Anyway, good luck to you.
    Low-poo: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Shampoo for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Coconut & Shea Hydrating Shampoo
    Clarify: Kinky Curly Come Clean
    Rinse-out: Alaffia Coffee & Shea Revitalizing Conditioner for Fine/Thin Hair (summer), Alaffia Everyday Coconut Ultra Hydrating Conditioner
    DT: Camille Rose Naturals Algae Renew Deep Conditioner
    Leave-in: As I Am Leave-in
    Styler: Lily of the Desert 99% Aloe Vera Gelly
    Treatment: Daily tea spray; Coconut oil overnight treatment; Citric acid rinse for hard water; 2-step Henndigo w/ amla to cover gray

    2C, fine, low porosity, low/medium density, protein sensitive

    Looking for styling products and tools

    iHerb Code KQS149 for 5% off your order

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