Skin Lightening Products

adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
So I decided to start a thread about skin lightening products because it's been on my mind. Awhile back I went to an International Store and saw a lot of bleaching creams. I asked the owner about it who is from the Philipines and she said people in her culture like to be light. The other day I went to a new Jamaican restaurant that also sells other stuff. There again full of skin lightning products. I haven't been back to that first store and am considering not going back to the second because it bothers me they sell this crap. I bought a magazine called Black Beauty and Hair that is printed in UK. Has overwhelming weave pictures and little natural but so do most black magazines. But what kills me are the large number of skin whitening ads in a magazine that is SUPPOSED to celebrate black beauty. I guess money is money. I don't want to buy this publication anymore or patronize those businesses. But should I blame them for making money even if it's off of racism and colorism and people feelings of inadequacy.

Now I have used fade cream for scars but these ads are clearly something else. This is part of a lightening ad and as you can see it says "Whitemania" in the corner.

.ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1460413351.971668.jpg
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Comments

  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1460413725.745368.jpg

    Just to name a few this is:
    Lightening scrub
    Active bleaching night cream
    Bleaching wipes
    Maximal bleaching fade cream
    Maximal concentration bleaching lotion
    Scrubing lightening shower gel.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1460414438.526900.jpg

    The Ultimate Lightening Package

    There are more but you get the idea. And all this is a magazine supposedly about black beauty SMH
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  • multicultcurlymulticultcurly Registered Users Posts: 5,136 Curl Connoisseur
    That's because the majority of British black people are from the Caribbean and non-African blacks are South Asian. Both of these regions heavily favor lighter skin at any costs, sort of like how loosening or straightening 4b hair is in the US. I don't think most people outside of those cultures or regions who shop at those stores see the absurdity and sadness that we as outsiders see.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App
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  • Curlista93Curlista93 Registered Users Posts: 411 Curl Novice
    That's because the majority of British black people are from the Caribbean and non-African blacks are South Asian. Both of these regions heavily favor lighter skin at any costs, sort of like how loosening or straightening 4b hair is in the US. I don't think most people outside of those cultures or regions who shop at those stores see the absurdity and sadness that we as outsiders see.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App
    I'm sure they don't. It's probably ingrained in their culture. I've never seen relaxing black hair as absurd as skin lightening but your comment has me thinking.....maybe it IS as absurd as putting chemicals on your skin to make it lighter.

    Relaxers have been prominent in African American culture for so long that maybe we don't see how absurd it really is. It's usually brushed off as just being a preference but if someone came up to me and said they lightened their skin as a "preference" I'd look at them like wtf?
    Kinky Curly, 4a, Fine Texture 
    Last Relaxer: 2/11/2012
    Latest BC: 11/24/2018


  • multicultcurlymulticultcurly Registered Users Posts: 5,136 Curl Connoisseur
    I think for some people straightening really is a preference. However, many people relax their hair out of habit and/or fear of not conforming or being seen as unattractive. I do find it crazy when people spend money they don't have, repetitively suffer scalp burns, freak out about rain, or spend hours forcing their hair to do the opposite of its nature just not to have nappy hair when their natural hair is 4b. This is why I think it's similar to skin lightening. And women other than African Americans do similar things though their natural hair is usually looser than 4b. Formaldehyde in Brazilian blowout, anyone?

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    3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
    HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
    Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed
  • FlygerianFlygerian Registered Users Posts: 22
    That's because the majority of British black people are from the Caribbean and non-African blacks are South Asian. Both of these regions heavily favor lighter skin at any costs, sort of like how loosening or straightening 4b hair is in the US. I don't think most people outside of those cultures or regions who shop at those stores see the absurdity and sadness that we as outsiders see.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App


    http://www.voice-online.co.uk/article/2011-census-british-africans-now-dominant-black-group
    Apparently black Africans are the majority now, I've read that other places too. The area I live in, when I was growing up seemed majority Caribbean but now seems majority African judging by who I see daily and what shops are around. Don't get it twisted, Africans do this skin lightening crap just as much in some places. There's also this thing that I've heard about happening in Nigeria called "pink lip" or something like that where people are actually getting their lips dyed to a lighter colour. It's basically tattooing their lips to a lighter pink because their lips are "too dark" or they have black lips. I'm sure they probably have that pink lip crap in other places too, but I've just heard about it happening in Nigeria recently and watched a video of it being done on YouTube. They'll be trying to dye dark gums next haha.

    The worst part is, those chemicals combined with the hot sun in these countries.... Recipe for disaster. Sad really. And as for black magazines that are supposed to celebrate black beauty advertising all this stuff, they wouldn't do so if so many people weren't lapping it up. They advertise what sells. Til people stop being so influenced by media and start gaining confidence, those companies will continue to make millions.
    People do it to others from such a young age too. When a newborn is born, they'll do things like look at the fingertips and ears to guess what colour they'll end up. I don't know if that's more crazy or more sad, but either way, it's messed up.


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  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
    Curlista93 wrote: »
    That's because the majority of British black people are from the Caribbean and non-African blacks are South Asian. Both of these regions heavily favor lighter skin at any costs, sort of like how loosening or straightening 4b hair is in the US. I don't think most people outside of those cultures or regions who shop at those stores see the absurdity and sadness that we as outsiders see.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App
    I'm sure they don't. It's probably ingrained in their culture. I've never seen relaxing black hair as absurd as skin lightening but your comment has me thinking.....maybe it IS as absurd as putting chemicals on your skin to make it lighter.

    Relaxers have been prominent in African American culture for so long that maybe we don't see how absurd it really is. It's usually brushed off as just being a preference but if someone came up to me and said they lightened their skin as a "preference" I'd look at them like wtf?

    I think for black Americans it's straightening more than just saying relaxing that's ingrained. So I think the pressing would to be in there because I grew up around a lot of people like my grandmas, great grandmas who never relaxed but who did this. I did in high school for a time before I started getting relaxed straight. On the other hand, my relatives with looser curls felt so such pressure.
    Also I think it's seen as a coming of age thing. Most of my classmates and cousins didn't get relaxers until junior high although I know some people get it at like 3.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte
    Flygerian wrote: »
    That's because the majority of British black people are from the Caribbean and non-African blacks are South Asian. Both of these regions heavily favor lighter skin at any costs, sort of like how loosening or straightening 4b hair is in the US. I don't think most people outside of those cultures or regions who shop at those stores see the absurdity and sadness that we as outsiders see.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using CurlTalk App


    http://www.voice-online.co.uk/article/2011-census-british-africans-now-dominant-black-group
    Apparently black Africans are the majority now, I've read that other places too. The area I live in, when I was growing up seemed majority Caribbean but now seems majority African judging by who I see daily and what shops are around. Don't get it twisted, Africans do this skin lightening crap just as much in some places. There's also this thing that I've heard about happening in Nigeria called "pink lip" or something like that where people are actually getting their lips dyed to a lighter colour. It's basically tattooing their lips to a lighter pink because their lips are "too dark" or they have black lips. I'm sure they probably have that pink lip crap in other places too, but I've just heard about it happening in Nigeria recently and watched a video of it being done on YouTube. They'll be trying to dye dark gums next haha.

    The worst part is, those chemicals combined with the hot sun in these countries.... Recipe for disaster. Sad really. And as for black magazines that are supposed to celebrate black beauty advertising all this stuff, they wouldn't do so if so many people weren't lapping it up. They advertise what sells. Til people stop being so influenced by media and start gaining confidence, those companies will continue to make millions.
    People do it to others from such a young age too. When a newborn is born, they'll do things like look at the fingertips and ears to guess what colour they'll end up. I don't know if that's more crazy or more sad, but either way, it's messed up.


    Sent from my D6603 using CurlTalk App

    Never heard of pink lip. Crazy.

    I get the money thing but I just hate hypocrites. I would rather people just be upfront as old Southern US blacks say " Don't talk out of both sides of your neck". Don't act like you are here to support the beauty of blackness and then promote something that is anti blackness and says white is better. I would not agree to this kind of advertising if it were my publication. If this was a US publication like Essence or Black Enterprise I think it would catch all kinds of hell and lose tons of subscribers. I know Ebony has a cover like in the 60s that said "Are Negro girls getting prettier?" And had all light skin straight hair chicks. People threw a fit and they still haven't lived that down.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • adthomasadthomas Registered Users Posts: 5,525 Curl Neophyte

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