Mixing honey directly into conditioner

Would there be anything wrong with mixing honey directly into a bottle of conditioner? I've been mixing honey and conditioner 50:50 in my hand and then applying it to my hair, and I love the results, but it just adds to my already lengthy showers. So I'm curious about mixing it into my bottle of conditioner. Would there be any problem of it "going bad"? Has anybody tried it already? Thanks for the help!
katrina.gif 1c-2a F-Mii
Password: mark
Routine: Jessicurl Cleansing Cream, various conditioners mixed 50:50 with honey, Giovanni Vitapro Fusion

Comments

  • aeroheadaerohead Posts: 179Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    hi there, i wanted to say that i have a little bottle that i keep in the bathroom specially for the use of honey and condish, what i do is mix some up 50/50 on the day that i will be washing my hair, and keep it in the fridge till im ready to use it, as for mixing it up in the long term, i have no idea, but that would be a great idea, has anywone ever mixed honey and condish up for use long term? do you think it will go off, if we prepare some for several hairwashes in advance?
    http://public.fotki.com/aerohead/
    pw:curlsrock
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Thick, 2C with little 3A's thrown in to make my hair look a little more wild.FIA:2c/3a-M
    Last Haircut:17/1/07
    Ultimate Goal: To go as long as possible
    Products Used:coconut cowash, tescos own gel citrus spice whipped butter
    Hair Length:BSL
    NEW PHOTOS ADDED: 20th August'09
    http://public.fotki.com/aerohead/
  • curlytwirlycurlytwirly Posts: 360Registered Users
    I did a search and found this info from different places:

    "Honey is a perishable product, in the sense that its quality deteriorates as it is a biological product. Fermentation occurs in honey under certain conditions due to presence of yeast and moisture, which spoils the honey."

    "If it is left exposed to the air, it will absorb water from the air. The greater concentration of water allows yeast (that is found naturally in the environment) to multiply. A by product of the yeast is alcohol - the honey ferments."

    "Honey that has been diluted with water, or that contains higher moisture levels, should be stored very cold or used immediately, as fermentation by wild yeast will likely begin at room temperatures."

    So basically, the conditioner has tons of water and it will definitely begin to ferment the honey. Only thing I am not sure of is whether it would be bad for the hair. I have heard beer is good for the hair so maybe fermented honey would have the same effect? But will it still be AS moisturizing? Dont know. If you want to be sure not to change the chemical properties of the honey make sure to use your mixture immediately or to refrigerate it between uses.
  • Gemini13Gemini13 Posts: 5,000Registered Users
    I did a search and found this info from different places:

    Honey is a perishable product, in the sense that its quality deteriorates as it is a biological product. Fermentation occurs in honey under certain conditions due to presence of yeast and moisture, which spoils the honey.

    If it is left exposed to the air, it will absorb water from the air. The greater concentration of water allows yeast (that is found naturally in the environment) to multiply. A by product of the yeast is alcohol - the honey ferments.

    Honey that has been diluted with water, or that contains higher moisture levels, should be stored very cold or used immediately, as fermentation by wild yeast will likely begin at room temperatures.

    So basically, the conditioner has tons of water and it will definitely begin to ferment the honey. Only thing I am not sure of is whether it would be bad for the hair. I have heard beer is good for the hair so maybe fermented honey would have the same effect? But will it still be AS moisturizing? Dont know. If you want to be sure not to change the chemical properties of the honey make sure to use your mixture immediately or to refrigerate it between uses.

    I don't know what effect fermenting honey would have on hair, lol... but it will make the condish go bad. There are preservatives in condish, but only so much. I don't know how quickly this happens, but I wouldn't advise mixing up any big batches.
    Brooklyn, NY

    Hair: 3A/B, Underlayer of 2B
    HG products:
    Winter- Giovanni Tea Tree (co-wash) & 50/50 (condish); Curl Junkie Curl Assurance Leave-In; Curls Milkshake & Quenched Curls; Re:coil; BRHG
    Summer: DevaCurl No Poo & OneC; CK; Re:coil; BRHG; Honey!!!

    fotki pw= crrrls
  • aeroheadaerohead Posts: 179Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    ewww! don't think i like the idea of putting fermenting honey in my hair, i mean i love my hair and all that but im just not willing to go thru that, nah, think i will just make it up as i go along, thanks for the advice though!
    http://public.fotki.com/aerohead/
    pw:curlsrock
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Thick, 2C with little 3A's thrown in to make my hair look a little more wild.FIA:2c/3a-M
    Last Haircut:17/1/07
    Ultimate Goal: To go as long as possible
    Products Used:coconut cowash, tescos own gel citrus spice whipped butter
    Hair Length:BSL
    NEW PHOTOS ADDED: 20th August'09
    http://public.fotki.com/aerohead/
  • MakingMyMarkMakingMyMark Posts: 29Registered Users
    Oh wow, that doesn't sound like a great idea anymore. I guess I'll stick to mixing it in my hand!

    Thank you so much for finding that info! Fermented honey.... :lol: How far are we willing to go for our hair?
    katrina.gif 1c-2a F-Mii
    Password: mark
    Routine: Jessicurl Cleansing Cream, various conditioners mixed 50:50 with honey, Giovanni Vitapro Fusion
  • elemielemi Posts: 22Registered Users
    I have a recipe that includes honey - it's added during the oil phase of making the conditioner. Funnily enough, I have it on my list of things to do today

    Honey doesn't like being heated, as it changes it's chemical consistency. However to add to an existing conditioner, you can try the following method.

    For a 300ml bottle of conditioner, pour 40ml in to a glass bowl or jug. Warm it in the microwave (or a bain-marie) at 30deg C.
    Stir in 5ml of honey until dissolved.
    Pour back into your conditioner bottle and shake well - or add the remaining conditioner to the honey mix, stir well, and then put back into the bottle (this would be a better method if your conditioner is really thick).
    Medical Aromatherapist,
    Manufacturer of Natural Bodycare products, and naturally red Type 3A Hair
  • MakingMyMarkMakingMyMark Posts: 29Registered Users
    Thank you so much for that info! I think I will try just pouring some honey into an almost-empty bottle of conditioner. That way if it starts to smell after a few days not much will be wasted.
    katrina.gif 1c-2a F-Mii
    Password: mark
    Routine: Jessicurl Cleansing Cream, various conditioners mixed 50:50 with honey, Giovanni Vitapro Fusion
  • elemielemi Posts: 22Registered Users
    If you can buy some raw honey from a health shop, that will be the one you want to add to a whole bottle of conditioner. Not sure if you have it available over there - here it is readily available as most areas have beehives locally.
    Medical Aromatherapist,
    Manufacturer of Natural Bodycare products, and naturally red Type 3A Hair
  • MakingMyMarkMakingMyMark Posts: 29Registered Users
    I actually just bought some raw honey today! Good to know that it is better. I will test it out tomorrow! Thank you so much for the info.
    katrina.gif 1c-2a F-Mii
    Password: mark
    Routine: Jessicurl Cleansing Cream, various conditioners mixed 50:50 with honey, Giovanni Vitapro Fusion

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