Hypothyroidism

pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
I apologize if this is a repeat topic. I did a search and found some threads with a lot of interesting and useful information. Most of them were older threads. Anyways, I just wanted to ask if your Hypothyroid symptoms subsided after your body adjusted to the thyroid medication? I'm starting my medication tomorrow. I'm tired of feeling tired all of the time.

Comments

  • RednaturalcurlsRednaturalcurls Registered Users Posts: 1,814 Curl Neophyte
    When you get to your right levels with the meds, the symptoms should subside. The most important thing I can tell you is make sure they look at more than just TSH. That alone is not enough info. You want at minimum to monitor Free T3, Free T4, Reverse T3, TSH and Thyroid antibodies. Also watch your Vitamin D and B levels as they tend to go down when hypo. Check out Stop the Thyroid Madness, Mary Shoman, Thyroid Sexy, Hypothyroid Mom. All are on FB and offer lots of info and support. And if they haven't told you, Synthroid is not your only option in meds. There is Armour, Nature Throid and a few others. Armour and Nature Throid are naturally dessicated and contain both T3 and T4 while Synthroid only contains T4. Some do better with the combination. Find a good endo that actually listens to you, not just treats based on labs alone and your golden. Best of luck. I lost my thyroid 5 years ago and it's still a challenge sometimes






    Sent from my SM-N900V using CurlTalk App
    Hair Type: mix of 3's, growing out an angled bob, color-treated red.
    Current products: GVP conditioning balm for co-wash and leave in, Curl Junkie Curls in a Bottle, Pattern Pusha and Garnier Anti-humidity hairspray
    Location:Sunny Florida
    Hair idol: Kimberly Schlapman from Little Big Town
  • Ethel_CookEthel_Cook Registered Users Posts: 49
    I've been taking my thyroid medication for almost ten years now but not religiously though, I'm taking Euthyrox now since I became hypo after giving birth last 2011. I can't tell anymore if it's working because I has been a part of my routine already.
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    Thank you so much for all of that information, Rednaturalcurls!

    Both my T3 and T4 tested in the normal range. My TSH was beyond high. We're still waiting for the results of the antibodies test.

    I've had many Hypothyroid symptoms in the past few months that I just passed off as life changes causing them. (Fatigue, emotional, irritable, forgetful). I learned my lesson. See your doctor if things are off. I also have a GREAT doctor.
  • EilonwyEilonwy Registered Users Posts: 12,391 Curl Connoisseur
    Things should go back to how they were before, but be prepared for how long it can take to reach the right dose. Each time your dose is increased your thyroid will down-regulate, and you'll have to wait a few weeks for your body to recalibrate its hormone production before getting your levels checked again. I think it's normal for the whole process to take at least a year.
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    I've been reading so much about diet (foods on the avoid lists/foods on the eat lists), fluoride, soy, thyroid levels, etc. I think I'm on information overload.


    Eilonwy - I had no idea it could take that long. I know every 'body' is different but it's good to know that I shouldn't expect immediate results.
  • Ethel_CookEthel_Cook Registered Users Posts: 49
    Eilonwy wrote: »
    Things should go back to how they were before, but be prepared for how long it can take to reach the right dose. Each time your dose is increased your thyroid will down-regulate, and you'll have to wait a few weeks for your body to recalibrate its hormone production before getting your levels checked again. I think it's normal for the whole process to take at least a year.

    Wow I didn't know this, thanks for sharing :)
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    Eilonwy wrote: »
    Things should go back to how they were before, but be prepared for how long it can take to reach the right dose. Each time your dose is increased your thyroid will down-regulate, and you'll have to wait a few weeks for your body to recalibrate its hormone production before getting your levels checked again. I think it's normal for the whole process to take at least a year.


    I completely forgot about this! My medication was increased a couple weeks ago. I told my husband that I felt like I was back at square one. Extremely tired, no motivation, forgetful, can't concentrate, etc. I have noticed a slight difference this week. My TSH levels have gone down quite a bit. 11.12 to 4.63. I hope she won't have to increase my medication again, but I'm prepared to hear that she will. I wish I would start losing the weight that I gained. :-/
  • EilonwyEilonwy Registered Users Posts: 12,391 Curl Connoisseur
    pinksugar wrote: »
    My TSH levels have gone down quite a bit. 11.12 to 4.63. I hope she won't have to increase my medication again, but I'm prepared to hear that she will.
    Wow, that's a really big improvement!

    I was thinking about this thread a couple days ago and read more about how the medication is titrated. It turns out there's disagreement among endocrinologists over how quickly to do it (except for really severe cases where improvement needs to be rapid, at least at first). Starting at a low dose and increasing a tiny bit at a time is the traditional method. Other endos prefer to use bigger increases, including a higher starting dose, until the "fine tuning" stage is reached. The biggest tradeoff is that the latter method gets you close to the right dose faster, but the former is less likely to wreak havoc while your thyroid down-regulates. So, there are reasons for doctors to prefer either method.

    I also want to clarify what I meant about medication making things go back to how they were before. You'll have your body's version of a "normal" metabolism, given your age, weight, body composition, etc. Unfortunately, it won't undo the weight gain: that will still take work. I'm not sure if that was clear from what I wrote. (Losing a certain amount of weight probably won't be too hard, because the way you're currently eating would put you at a caloric deficit with a normal metabolism.)

    Anyway, I'm obviously not a medical professional :toothy4: This is my layperson's understanding of how things work: I can't make any guarantees. I'm interested in knowing about any mistakes I've made, though. Have you had a chance to talk to your doctor about this stuff?
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    I go back to see my doctor next month. I will ask more questions then. Thank you so much for all of the information. I've been working out and following Weight Watchers and my weight is not budging. I guess I just need to try harder or give it more time. I'm not giving up on it though.
  • akpakp Registered Users Posts: 2
    Is anyone aware of any MDs ( or otherwise) in the Akron, Cleveland area who are known to prescribe Armour? --- Looking for a Doctor will look at symptoms more than lab ranges.

    Thank you ---
  • curly66curly66 Registered Users Posts: 161
    Here are some resources for patient recommended doctors:

    https://www.officialgenaleenolin.com/preferred-doctors/
    Curl Type: 3B/C thick shoulder length brunette
    Favorite Products: Elucence Moisture Balancing Conditioner, Biotera Styling Gel found @ Sally's, Trader Joe's Nourish, Shea Moisture Retention Shampoo
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    I quit doing WW and started doing more research on diets for Hypothyroidism. There isn't actually a Hypothyroidism diet but I have found lists of what I should and shouldn't eat. I was somewhat following these guidelines when I was diagnosed back in February. I got away from them because everyone I knew with Hypo said they didn't pay any attention to what they ate. Well, I've been feeling horrible the last few weeks. Extremely tired, brain fog, weight went up 4 lbs, etc. I went back for repeat labs yesterday but won't know anything for about a week. I'm back to watching what I eat. I felt so much better when I did it before.
  • LotsawavesLotsawaves Registered Users Posts: 9,777 Curl Virtuoso
    My daughter started her diet & supplements recommended by her doc 2 weeks ago. She has lost 6 lbs. She had a food allergy test done also so her diet is specific to her. She still doesn't have her energy back, but it said it could take 4 weeks.
    From Michael Berg:

    Every person has a unique connection to the Creator that can never be extinguished, and every person has a great soul that can manifest important things in our world. To make a person feel less than they are because of something inside themselves, be it faith, race, or sexual orientation, is the greatest sin of all."
  • EilonwyEilonwy Registered Users Posts: 12,391 Curl Connoisseur
    Mayo Clinic says that there's no hypothyroidism diet, but that the following foods and medications should be taken at least a few hours before or after synthetic thyroid hormone:

    • "Too much dietary fiber"
    • Walnuts
    • Soybean flour
    • Cottonseed meal
    • Iron supplements or multivitamins containing iron
    • Calcium supplements
    • Antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium
    • Some ulcer medications, such as sucralfate (Carafate)
    • Some cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as those containing cholestyramine (Questran) and colestipol (Colestid)

    Is that what you read? For some reason, hypothyroidism is a magnet for misinformation. Mayo Clinic's pretty trustworthy, but you should still run stuff by your doctor. (I'm sure you already know that, but I figured it's worth saying.)
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    Eilonwy wrote: »
    Mayo Clinic says that there's no hypothyroidism diet, but that the following foods and medications should be taken at least a few hours before or after synthetic thyroid hormone:

    • "Too much dietary fiber"
    • Walnuts
    • Soybean flour
    • Cottonseed meal
    • Iron supplements or multivitamins containing iron
    • Calcium supplements
    • Antacids that contain aluminum or magnesium
    • Some ulcer medications, such as sucralfate (Carafate)
    • Some cholesterol-lowering drugs, such as those containing cholestyramine (Questran) and colestipol (Colestid)

    Is that what you read? For some reason, hypothyroidism is a magnet for misinformation. Mayo Clinic's pretty trustworthy, but you should still run stuff by your doctor. (I'm sure you already know that, but I figured it's worth saying.)


    Thank you, Eilonwy. Yes, I saw that one too. I got my results back this morning and my TSH is down to 2.71, Free T3 and Free T4 are normal.
  • pinksugarpinksugar Registered Users Posts: 2,346 Curl Connoisseur
    I've been feeling like I have anxiety a lot lately. It isn't anything I can't handle. It's more annoying than anything. I'll just be at my desk and get that uncomfortable feeling in the pit of my stomach. I stumbled upon an article yesterday saying that hypo causes anxiety. I can't find the article now. Has anyone experienced this?
  • RednaturalcurlsRednaturalcurls Registered Users Posts: 1,814 Curl Neophyte
    YES!!!! I feel like I'm crazy sometimes because of it.

    Sent from my SM-N900V using CurlTalk App
    Hair Type: mix of 3's, growing out an angled bob, color-treated red.
    Current products: GVP conditioning balm for co-wash and leave in, Curl Junkie Curls in a Bottle, Pattern Pusha and Garnier Anti-humidity hairspray
    Location:Sunny Florida
    Hair idol: Kimberly Schlapman from Little Big Town

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file