Body part hardest hit by age/gravity?

spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Registered Users Posts: 17,898 Curl Virtuoso
What area of your body has deteriorated the most in appearance and tone as you've aged?

i've always had a couple of dimples in my butt cheeks. But now they are a big, mushy, dimply mess. I'm even getting dimples in my upper thighs. Used to have great thighs...

Not sure if I can do anything about the flabby, dimply butt bc even when I was young and thin, I always had a fat butt. It used to be more solid and smooth then, tho.

Comments

  • jeepcurlygurljeepcurlygurl Registered Users, Curl Ambassador Posts: 20,731 Curl Virtuoso
    As for gravity, boobs and butt are affected the most for me. And I guess jowls are at least partly caused by gravity.

    Age is pretty much noticeable everywhere. Hair, face, skin, hands, neck, nails.

    I don't stress over it too much. There are days that I'm shocked when I look in the mirror but most of the time I just try to remember all the fun I had getting those wrinkles and age spots and cellulite, and that I survived all those things that gave me those grey hairs.
    --I'm located in Western PA.   --I found NC in late 2004, CG since February 2005, joined the forums in May 2005, started going grey in late 2005.   --My hair is 3B with some 3A, currently at mid back length when dry,  texture-medium/fine, porosity-top is low, middle is medium, ends are porous, elasticity-normal.   --My long time favorite products are Suave & VO5 conditioners, LA Looks Sport Gel, coconut oil, honey, vinegar.   
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  • 2poodles2poodles Registered Users Posts: 2,485 Curl Connoisseur
    Boobs and butt. A well-fitting bra really helps with the boobs. I'm still looking for great yoga pants to help camouflage butt cellulite a bit better. I wear athleta yoga pants and they do a fairly good job - but I like to wear a long top with them for added cover-up.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2Poodles :flower: Southeast PA
    fine, med porosity, normal elasticity
    Currently using the following 2 - 3 x/week:
    Living Proof Perfect Hair Day suphate-free Poo, cone-free CO and styling treatment, plus KCCC

  • curry curlscurry curls Registered Users Posts: 1,083 Curl Connoisseur
    Face. I'm aging like both of my grandmothers put together. Sigh...
    Started CG July 8, 2008


    3B

    Co-wash: Deva Decadence No Poo
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    Others: ACV rinses and protein treatments


  • okyouwinokyouwin Registered Users Posts: 157
    My butt is getting droopy. It makes me sad!
    I'm going to go ahead and say 3a
    fine/medium texture and a bit porous-I color
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  • claudine191claudine191 Registered Users Posts: 8,221 Curl Connoisseur
    The butt is okay, but somehow a dirigible-shaped puff of fat has accumulated right in the center of my stomach.

    Also, my upper arms are not.....firm. They used to look like fettucine — long and narrow — but now the top looks more like a shell waiting for a blop of ricotta cheese. I can only imagine how much worse it would be if I didn't routinely walk a dog who pulls me like the Little Engine that Could.

    Oh, and my upper eyelids are getting saggy. I remember this happening to my father. I don't mind too much because I look more like I feel now, and less like a chipper little woodland creature.
  • StarmieStarmie Registered Users Posts: 7,169 Curl Virtuoso
    My boobs and bum are definitely heading south but don't worry me overly much, my bum's always been big (I'm a pear shape) so I'm kind of over being self-conscious about it, and it seems boobs are a pretty common thing to go, so I'm just running with the crowd there!
    My upper arms are not a pretty sight however, nor is the double(ish) chin.
    3b in South Australia.
  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    I say the boobs, there's only so much exercise can do for them, but the butt, thighs, etc. just requires a good workout with weights. My present problems in other parts of my body are due to carrying excess pounds, I'm sure when I can finally shed them my body will look much better, including my big arms which have some cellullite... I take care of my skin by eating lots of vegetables and fruits, taking vitamins/minerals and using as little soap/body wash on my skin as I can get away with.
  • curlyprincess1curlyprincess1 Registered Users Posts: 468
    As for the boobs, mine seem to have gotten bigger as I have gotten older. I believe in having much support in that area. I wear a bra all the time now.
    It's not easy being a princess, but hey, if the crown fits.
  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    Mine did too, and they're not badly sagging, just drooping like bigger breasts usually do... but I do not wear a bra at home, it's my personal opinion that it's not healthy to wear one all the time and there's no real proof that doing it prevents sagging. In fact, when I was younger in a gym the instructor told us that it was good to not wear a bra at least occasionally to give the muscles and ligaments a chance to get stronger...
  • CurlyInParadiseCurlyInParadise Registered Users Posts: 137
    I have been very thin all my life so no up and down weight. I guess i thought that was what caused older woman's arms and thighs to sag. So i was just watching my face as i got older and was surprised that about the time I turned sixty, my upper arms began to look like 80. The sagging and wrinkling has surpassed my face, now at 67 YO. I guess i should be thankful but having to keep those arms covered in Texas heat is a pain.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]______
    3a, med porous, low density
    Poo: Have to admit I have recently become a Wen convert. Love it. I have always had problems with my hair "hanging" right, curling uniformly and destorting the perimeter line. Wen makes it hang evenly.
  • caramix3acaramix3a Registered Users Posts: 462 Curl Neophyte
    I'd say tummy and boobs to some extent - My breasts got larger - I always had a nice dainty 34-B but now they're a full C, even with not that much change in weight. So I finally went and got fitted at Nordstrom and got a great style for me. My only trouble spot is my tummy, but since it's not too far-gone, I know that would be fixed if I tightened up on my diet a little more, and did more cardio in addition to my strength-training workouts. Working on all of them:) I've had a good workout program in place for a good while now, so my arms and legs are actually in pretty good shape at nearly 67.
    Muscle loss, as well as some hormonal changes, accounts for the laxity in the arms and legs, if not the whole body, that many women experience as they age if they don't do anything about it. And that lost muscle gets replaced by fat, so someone can find themselves weighing about the same as they used to, but now they're larger because the fat tissue takes up a lot more room than denser muscle tissue. If not attended to, this body composition shift can really impinge on our ability to live independently as we age further, not to mention putting us at higher risk for injuries from falls, as well as serious disease(from the increased fat). Hormonal shifts tend to put on fat around the mid-section, causing all kinds of problems. Lest all this sound dire, age-related muscle loss can be GREATLY slowed down by a solid workout program, and one might not experience frailty until much later in life(like 80s and 90s maybe, although there are some of those folks who are still going strong too, so it's possible.) And that mid-section can be controlled to a great degree by paying even more attention to one's diet. A lot of mature women are much more sensitive to carbohydrates(especially refined starchy ones)than formerly)and have to cut back on those or in some cases even eliminate ALL starchy carbs and even fruit(personally I would just die if I had to do that!:()in order to get rid of the mid-section menopausal pudge. Bumping up one's protein helps, it also helps with building and maintaining muscle mass in conjunction with working out. Also, one needs 200 calories less per decade, just to maintain one's weight, so if aiming to lose, one does have to tighten up even more than one thought one had to, and get more exercise. By working out, I mean good old hard work at the gym, or a great home program if one doesn't have gym access.
    All that said, we won't have 20-year-old bodies back, but we can be healthy, strong and well-shaped according to our individual body builds. That does not look like what's in the magazines but is much saner and healthier to boot. Plus one FEELS better too!:)
    I know this got kind of long, but this is a subject I feel very strongly about, that of health and fitness into our later years especially.
  • koolkurlkoolkurl Registered Users Posts: 252 Curl Neophyte
    Aging and body changes are difficult and inevitable aren't they but good genes help I suppose. I don't think I inherited those genes though:( At 50, I look a bit more tired and my stomach is not as flat as it used to be (and I am thin) and my knees are a bit wrinkly. I am trying to work out and I found a funny book to help me cope with the changes I See You Made an Effort: Compliments, Indignities, and Survival Stories from the Edge of 50: Annabelle Gurwitch: 9780399166181: Amazon.com: Books
  • Cristy_amkCristy_amk Registered Users Posts: 171 Curl Neophyte
    Neck! Everyone wonders why I tilt my head for photos. LOL it camouflages turkey neck...to a degree!
  • caramix3acaramix3a Registered Users Posts: 462 Curl Neophyte
    @koolkurl: yes, genetics do play into this to a certain degree, but at the same time, even with good genetics, if one abuses them that doesn't get anyone anywhere does it? With excellent genetics, it just might take longer for said abuse to show up and reach critical mass. Conversely, even if we're dealt with not such a great hand, all that means is that we might have to be more vigilant and work harder with some things. Also to realize what one can improve(weight, fitness performance), and what's innate(body structure, certain flexibility aspects). A larger-boned more heavily-built woman is never going to look like the willowy ballerina - she risks going right into an eating disorder if she tries. But said woman if she works out well can be powerful, sleekly built, like a big cat. How cool is that?:) Just like that delicately-built long-boned ballerina is going to be challenged to add muscle size to her frame. However, if the ballet dancer gets onto a good program and eats well, she will become stronger, and have some beautiful shape and definition going on. Then there are some people who put on muscle at the drop of a hat(the mesomorphs among us), and those who gain fat if they even think about eating a sandwich, so it goes all over the place. Still, one can do something within one's parameters.
    Lest anyone think they can't do anything because they're "over 50", let me remind everyone that in a nursing home with frail 85-year-olds and older, some fitness people started the folks off with light dumbbell exercises they could do in their wheel chairs. A number of weeks later, measurable increases in strength and muscle mass were noted. If they could do it, certainly middle-aged people who still have all their abilities can definitely do something. At my gym, I see several disabled people working out. One guy has only one arm, but he does beautiful, soulful yoga. Another young man, who lost his legs below the knee, is there several times a week in his wheelchair, but able to use a number of the machines. He's in quite good shape too. As someone who suffered a knee injury a few years ago now, and recovered, I'm inspired when I see people who have had worse things happen and they're persevering.
    Also, there's so much stuff heaped on us as aging women it's no wonder that many just throw in the towel and just get resigned to stuff. Sure, things change, but one can learn to work with them in a positive manner. None of us are perfect, but if we're working on improving our general health, that's excellent - any move in that direction is good!:) I'll have to check out the book synopsis, or maybe our library has it.
  • OldschoolbabeOldschoolbabe Registered Users Posts: 39
    Ankles, when did i get old lady cankles? So unattractive and old lady.

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using CurlTalk App
  • SpiralliSpiralli Registered Users Posts: 3,684 Curl Connoisseur
    Boobs and abdominal muscles for me. A good bra definitely helps with the first, but I really struggle to keep my abdominal area looking "not lumpy".
    Location: Texas
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  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    caramix3a wrote: »
    @koolkurl: yes, genetics do play into this to a certain degree, but at the same time, even with good genetics, if one abuses them that doesn't get anyone anywhere does it? With excellent genetics, it just might take longer for said abuse to show up and reach critical mass. Conversely, even if we're dealt with not such a great hand, all that means is that we might have to be more vigilant and work harder with some things. Also to realize what one can improve(weight, fitness performance), and what's innate(body structure, certain flexibility aspects). A larger-boned more heavily-built woman is never going to look like the willowy ballerina - she risks going right into an eating disorder if she tries. But said woman if she works out well can be powerful, sleekly built, like a big cat. How cool is that?:) Just like that delicately-built long-boned ballerina is going to be challenged to add muscle size to her frame. However, if the ballet dancer gets onto a good program and eats well, she will become stronger, and have some beautiful shape and definition going on. Then there are some people who put on muscle at the drop of a hat(the mesomorphs among us), and those who gain fat if they even think about eating a sandwich, so it goes all over the place. Still, one can do something within one's parameters.
    Lest anyone think they can't do anything because they're "over 50", let me remind everyone that in a nursing home with frail 85-year-olds and older, some fitness people started the folks off with light dumbbell exercises they could do in their wheel chairs. A number of weeks later, measurable increases in strength and muscle mass were noted. If they could do it, certainly middle-aged people who still have all their abilities can definitely do something. At my gym, I see several disabled people working out. One guy has only one arm, but he does beautiful, soulful yoga. Another young man, who lost his legs below the knee, is there several times a week in his wheelchair, but able to use a number of the machines. He's in quite good shape too. As someone who suffered a knee injury a few years ago now, and recovered, I'm inspired when I see people who have had worse things happen and they're persevering.
    Also, there's so much stuff heaped on us as aging women it's no wonder that many just throw in the towel and just get resigned to stuff. Sure, things change, but one can learn to work with them in a positive manner. None of us are perfect, but if we're working on improving our general health, that's excellent - any move in that direction is good!:) I'll have to check out the book synopsis, or maybe our library has it.

    I SO completely agree with you! Because of all my own observations and reading I'm of the strong opinion most of the signs of ageing don't just happen to us, we ALLOW them to happen. As you said too, very often because we have too much on our plates and the stress just makes want to relax so we avoid "hard" things like working out or cooking healthier meals, or we do a half-hearted effort and don't tackle the problem of muscle loss.

    I am very glad that you brought up working with weights, a number of years ago I bought the book "Strong Women, Strong Bones" which gave me hope of avoiding in the future becoming like the lady in the TV commercial that said "I've fallen and I can't get up!" Although I've always been a believer of the benefits of exercise and always practice some form of it (or more), during the past year because of a lot of stress in my life I've been less dedicated and have indulged too much on the processed carbs so I've piled up additional pounds, most on my torso, typical sign of excess cortisol weight gain. But after a recent trip to FL which brought all that up front to my attention I've decided to cut out most sugar and starches and include more fiber in my diet, but also exercise more, especially with dumbbells.

    I want to be able to live alone and take care of my own needs for as long as I can so I know it's up to me to achieve that, but I also want to look as good as I can for as long as I can and that's an added benefit to putting some effort in taking care of ourselves instead of resigning ourselves to "genetics" or just the passing of time.

  • CurlyInParadiseCurlyInParadise Registered Users Posts: 137
    Im a contradiction to most of the solutions to my aging problems. As far as loss of muscle tone in my upper arms that sag and are wrinkly, i have been athletic all my life and still am. I do nightly squats, situps and lift dumbbell weights. Two things are an incentive; (1) i have a horse and love to ride her at a canter and need core muscle strength to do that plus climb up on the saddle with ease and 2) my Mother lived to be 93 but she didnt walk well the last ten years. But with all that at sixty my arms sagged as if I had yo yo dieted. Some tell me that I have not maintained enough weight to fill out my arms properly.

    The other aging issue I have is high cholestral. I weigh 103, am 5'4' same as in high school. Another contradiction, to me anyway. So i have had to get serious about a diet with only the right foods, never straying, so as to avoid statin drugs, just refuse to take those.

    So I tell my husband, it doesnt matter what you do you dont get away with anything as you age!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]______
    3a, med porous, low density
    Poo: Have to admit I have recently become a Wen convert. Love it. I have always had problems with my hair "hanging" right, curling uniformly and destorting the perimeter line. Wen makes it hang evenly.
  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    That's because exercise alone can't give everyone good muscle tone. I have great muscle tone (even under the fat parts, lol!) and I believe it's because I've always eaten sufficient protein and taken quite a few supplements, including all the ones mentioned here, so check the list out and see if there's some you may need to start taking.

    High cholesterol may be due to slow thyroid function. Some supplements can also help lower cholesterol, off the top of my head granulated lecithin (which I've also taken) and iodine taken with selenium (which are thyroid essential minerals).
  • caramix3acaramix3a Registered Users Posts: 462 Curl Neophyte
    Generally speaking, once one gets onto a solid fitness program with resistance(weights, really challenging body weight work, whatever)one does become aware that diet is right along in there - pardon me if I didn't mention that. In my book, the two go hand in hand, a given, in fact. People usually end up cleaning up their diet sooner or later once they get on the fitness bandwagon.
    Yes, sufficient protein is important, whether one is omnivous, or vegetarian(I'm mostly vegetarian myself). However, a recent study came out that consuming even 10-20% protein in one's diet, especially animal protein, in middle age actually dramatically increases one's cancer risk. Maybe I was on the right track all along in this what with being largely vegetarian and getting a lot of produce in over the years.
    However, after the age of 65, increased protein in one's diet is actually beneficial, for the very reasons CGsince2002 says. I do try to get in some more protein now, since I'll be 67 in June. I do eat eggs and seafood. Poultry was the last meat I gave up some years ago. I've been OFF red meat for more than 30 years and I shudder at the thought of eating it. Even one bite sat in my tummy. However, I've started to dip my toe back into eating at least a tiny bit of poultry, like in soup again, and it's possible that I could work back up to eating a whole piece of chicken or turkey once again. But my arms are still firm, and my legs are like rocks, so I must not be doing TOO bad on that score, along with the working out over the years.
    About not being able to get away with anything dietwise as we age, that's absolutely true! One thing that is absolute fact, is that for each decade beyond 40, is that we require 200 calories less per day to maintain our weight. Add in menopause to the mix, and you see where this is going. The perfectly healthy diet that was wonderful for you when you were 40, is now fattening you, because it's now simply too much food for your needs. So with necessary calorie reduction, in order to fulfill one's nutritional needs, there's NO room for junk. Some people notice that they're much less tolerant of carbs in their diet too.
    To the person with the high cholesterol despite being at a low weight, after menopause, cholesterol and blood sugar often rise, even in people who previously had perfectly healthy, even low readings. You're wise to stay away from statins - they come with more risks than benefits for many people. My husband tried to take them and within only 3 days he felt weak. For people who work out, this is NOT good. There are horror stories out there about people who persisted with statins and had so much muscle deterioration they had to go on rehab programs. NOT good.
  • chupiechupie Registered Users Posts: 5,280 Curl Connoisseur
    My skin. It's like it turned weird overnight. Ugh. Depressing.
    2a medium porous, You can see my wavy tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLy8bclCLgER5N_uVYSYZNxhBHSXAW40OQ and my wavy blog is The Wavy Nation http://wavynation.wordpress.com
  • caramix3acaramix3a Registered Users Posts: 462 Curl Neophyte
    "My skin. It's like it turned weird overnight. Ugh. Depressing."

    @chupie: Did it just get very very dry and crepe-y all of a sudden? This does happen to many women around menopause, or right after. It's surprising just how fast this can happen for some people too. Best thing to do, although this doesn't fix it entirely, is being sure you're very well-hydrated from the inside and getting enough EFA's(essential fatty acids)in your diet. Reason I say that is because people as they age naturally dry out. On a younger person, drinking a lot more water and taking EFAs wouldn't make that much of a difference because the stuff is still there, but in someone older, it DOES make a difference. Externally, about all one can do is keep it comfortable as far as dryness goes - rich moisturizing lotions and creams, not bathing in hot water, adding humidity in your dwelling if you live in a dry climate, etc. The main other depressing things for many are some combo of wrinkling, sun spots, and sagging. To what degree and what combo of these depends on one's lifestyle and genetics. In fact, as far as skin stuff goes, genetics really does come into it far more than many people think. I'm sure we all know someone with flawless skin that looks like she spent a mint on it, but no, this person often has the most minimal of routines and thinks that skin care in general is BS, while someone else "does all the right things" and still struggles with looking, well, just OK.
    If one has lots of money one can have cosmetic procedures done, but a whole lot of us aren't even in that market anyway, nor do we even wish to be. It's a slippery slope because once one has something done, something else comes to one's attention to be done and there it goes. Which leads to the kind of pitiful people who really do look like they're trying too hard with all the procedures etc. But there's nothing wrong at all with doing something like that if it really does make one happy and look better, so there are two sides to the coing
  • chupiechupie Registered Users Posts: 5,280 Curl Connoisseur
    Yup. Dry and crepey like overnight. Suddenly I can use heavy moisturizers that used to just damp my skin. I'm sure it's not the worst skin for a fifty y.o. But it shocked me. Not like I've ever had to die for skin but I knew what it was doing!!
    2a medium porous, You can see my wavy tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLy8bclCLgER5N_uVYSYZNxhBHSXAW40OQ and my wavy blog is The Wavy Nation http://wavynation.wordpress.com
  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    The state of our skin has in part to do with the decline of hormones, which is a good reason to use small amount of bio-identical hormones even after menopause.

    But how we take care of our skin is also extremely important.
    The pic in my profile is a few years old but I was already way into my 50s but I think it shows pretty good skin and at the time some people thought I was still in my early 40s. I have combination skin on my face, with a pretty oily T-zone; the oils help preserve it but I also take reasonably good care of it. In the winter it can get dry, so I massage it with a combo of oils for 5-6 min. a couple of times a week shortly after I get up. I rarely put any soap on it, in the morning I only rinse it off, and at night I remove my MU either with a cream cleanser of a combination of baby shampoo and oil, and I also exfoliate several times a week. I don't use expensive creams, my moisturizer is one for babies made mostly of natural ingredients and my night cream is a progesterone cream to which sometimes I add Vit. E.

    The skin of my body also looks pretty good for my age. I don't ever bathe or shower with hot water which dries out the skin and causes it to sag. During the winter,
    I often scrub myself with a mixture of a cheap hair conditioner to which I add a good amount of oil instead of using body wash or soap, and as soon as I towel dry myself I put a good lotion on (I avoid mineral oil or petrolatum).

    I also don't feel the need to wash my body every single day when it's cold, and coincidentally I read this yesterday. Like it says there, I just clean all the important parts on the days that I don't. And in case anyone's frowning, I
    live alone, presently don't work and don't go out much. And when it warms up and I begin to shower daily (in the summer up to 3x) I don't put soap or body wash all over either. I like to use a back brush all over 2-3x a week to exfoliate all the dead skin.

    [IMG]http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/<a href=http://s339.photobucket.com/user/RaquelJudith/media/Raquel/WinterWonderlandDance2013.jpg.html target=_blank>[/img]WinterWonderlandDance2013.jpgI don't eat a lot of junk foods, and a couple of months ago I began drastically reducing my consumption of meat and now eat a lot of completely vegan meals. Despite my sweet tooth I try not to indulge too regularly because sugar can be very aging. I try to drink sufficient water throughout the day, always starting my day with a full glass of water, I even drink some before I go to bed even if it means having to get up after a few hours. I've also been taking quite a few supplements for practically all my life, and they include most of the ones that are good for the skin and hair. Oh, and I do facial exercises regularly too.

    Now, if only I could get my nails to get stronger that would be great...I must be missing something because lately they are so brittle and ridged they break all the time.
  • chupiechupie Registered Users Posts: 5,280 Curl Connoisseur
    Pretty sure insurance won't pay for bio identical hormones. If I could even find a doc that agrees with that.
    2a medium porous, You can see my wavy tutorials here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLy8bclCLgER5N_uVYSYZNxhBHSXAW40OQ and my wavy blog is The Wavy Nation http://wavynation.wordpress.com
  • CGSince2002CGSince2002 Banned Users Posts: 1,073
    I haven't had insurance for ages, so I've been ordering my estrogen on the internet, last time from eBay, quite affordable and took only 2 weeks coming from Asia. I only need to use a tiny bit and not even everyday so I grind the tabs and just put a little bit under my tongue so a couple of boxes can last me for several months. And for progesterone, I use a cream that can be ordered from a number of supplement stores or bought from a health food store.

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