Lightening hair with honey

AnsleyBirch13AnsleyBirch13 Registered Users Posts: 180
Has anybody ever lightened their hair with honey before? I want to go lighter but don't want to have any chemical damage. You're supposed to use four parts honey one part water or apple cider vinegar. What would the difference be between using water or ACV? Also, it said for more drastic effects add a couple cap fulls of hydrogen peroxide. Would this be damaging? Thanks!

Comments

  • BluebloodBlueblood Registered Users Posts: 1,748 Curl Neophyte
    Just because something is natural doesn't mean it's a chemical.

    Most of the information I read about honey implies it doesn't work.

    Even if it does work because the results will be unpredictable so you are better of doing a chemical process like bleach or hair dye where you test the product on shed hair before doing it on your head hair.
  • AnsleyBirch13AnsleyBirch13 Registered Users Posts: 180
    Blueblood wrote: »
    Just because something is natural doesn't mean it's a chemical.

    Most of the information I read about honey implies it doesn't work.

    Even if it does work because the results will be unpredictable so you are better of doing a chemical process like bleach or hair dye where you test the product on shed hair before doing it on your head hair.

    No I was just saying that I didn't want to do anything chemical like dye or highlight it
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Registered Users Posts: 3,750 Curl Neophyte
    Raw honey lightens by releasing peroxide: that destroys the melanin pigment which blows holes in the cortex increasing porosity.

    Box dyes lighten using peroxide and/ or persulphate bleach ... which breaks down to peroxide.

    Ultimately it's all chemicals and all the same effect - lightening is damaging period. The amount of damage caused is a function of the initial condition of your hair, the alkalinity of the solution, how many shades you lift.

    To reduce damage when lightening pre-treat with coconut oil and/ hydrolysed wheat or soy protein. I suspect coconut oil would stop honey lightening from working because it is so weak, but it does not affect commercial lightening products.

    Aftercare for lightened hair includes lauric acid (coconut oil), hydrolysed protein, ceramides, 18-MEA and panthenol. These are all chemicals yet all found in nature: ceramides and 18-MEA are components of healthy human hair.

    Just because something *sounds* artificial doesn't mean that it is bad. Furthermore there are many poisons, allergens, toxins and irritants found in nature.
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • G94G94 Registered Users Posts: 5
    Ive used honey mixed with coconut oil and it has worked for me, my hair went from dark brown ( looked pretty much black) to medium brown. What worked for me was to mix the coconut oil an honey and just let it simmer for about 5 min. Don't heat the honey as it apparently kills the peroxide in the homey which is what is going o lighten the hair .

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