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Girl sent home for wearing Afro or locs

chupiechupie Posts: 5,275Registered Users Curl Connoisseur

Comments

  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    An afro is what combed kinky coily hair does naturally, and dreadlocks are what it does naturally if not combed (yes I know locs are normally styled and maintained). Did they learn nothing from the school than tried to ban the afro puff, AKA the humble ponytail?
    Ohio School Bans Afro Puffs and Braids *UPDATE!* | Black Girl with Long Hair

    And apparently this time the school is run by African Americans
    Tulsa school sends girl home over hair - Page 2
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • SpiralSpunkSpiralSpunk Posts: 243Registered Users
    I came accross a follow up interview with the girl's father: Exclusive Interview w/ Father of Girl Sent Home for Wearing DreadLocks- "We Just Want Our Story Heard" | Curly Nikki | Natural Hair Styles and Natural Hair Care

    This school also spanks the children with paddles!!!
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    I would document everything that happened, demand a copy of the dress code rules from the school and then lawyer up.
  • adthomasadthomas Posts: 5,525Registered Users
    Deborah Brown Community School - Students Today. Leaders Tomorrow.

    Check out the staff. If I had the choice between dealing with racists versus self haters I will take racists any day. I have no patience for self hating black people whose mind sets are still on the plantation with massah. They dislike anything too black and want to be "white washed" because they think that is more acceptable. . And these are hypocrites too. One of the teachers is clearly sporting locs or twists. One teacher got an afro puff. Head lady is rocking a curly fro wig. Also one teacher a Ms?? Gwynn writes about her marriage and divorce in her professional bio. Who does that and who cares and what does her romantic life have to do with her teaching abilities?

    Rachet Rachet Rachet. There was nothing unpresentable about that little girl's hair.
    My child would not be going to that school.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • fightingfrizzfightingfrizz Posts: 65Registered Users
    So they don't share that philosophy beloved of many school about allowing individuals to express themselves and celebrate their uniqueness... :banghead:

    Let's all be clones, yay!
    UK based, Curly from birth 2b-2c fairly porous with cherub tendencies and frizz halo! Faves include KCKT and Keracare LIs, Deva Curl, CCCCL, Ecosyler gel and Be Curly Curl Enhancer. I don’t mind the odd cone - shhh smile.gif CG since August 2012
  • poxyfairyplumepoxyfairyplume Posts: 85Registered Users
    Honestly, from the looks of it, they were doing the little girl and her family a favor. I don't understand how her hair was inappropriate. However, it was in the dress code - so they really should have enforced this earlier on if they were going to. It sounds like a very disorganized school. I can understand afros being a problem, and not being able to see the chalkboard, but dreads? Especially the little ones that she has? Come on!
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,275Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Yeah no. No one has hair so big you can't see a board. If someone wants to wear their hair naturally they should be able to. Dreadlocks certainly wouldn't prevent it either. Frankly it's a bunch of tosh.
  • adthomasadthomas Posts: 5,525Registered Users
    Honestly, from the looks of it, they were doing the little girl and her family a favor. I don't understand how her hair was inappropriate. However, it was in the dress code - so they really should have enforced this earlier on if they were going to. It sounds like a very disorganized school. I can understand afros being a problem, and not being able to see the chalkboard, but dreads? Especially the little ones that she has? Come on!

    Can you please explain how they were doing the family a favor?

    Also if you grow 7 inches on wavy hair it will hang down. If I grow 7inches of my tightly curly hair it will poof out like afro.. If I am required to braid or straighten my naturally growing hair then you should be too otherwise it is discrimination. I don't see an all girls must pull back their hair policy here. Secondly hair does not loc overnight so it is not like she could have all of a sudden started wearing dreads. Speaking of distraction I considered long flowy hair a distraction in school. I hated sitting behind those girls in high school because they were always getting their hair out of their face by flipping it back and right in my face. I remember a girl finally had enough once and grabbed another girl by the hair. Im not saying that was right but my point is it was a distraction and no one was was making these girls "control" their hair.
    And just because a school system has rules people should not feel obligated to accept them if they are unfair. If that was the case we would still have segregated schools. And like I said several of the teachers don't follow this policy so why do the students have to respect rules the teachers don't.
    To say afros and dreads are fads is laughable. What do they think we did for centuries before relaxers, blowdryers and pressing combs? If anything is a fad it is straightening.
    Yes, it's real. No, you can't touch it. :wav:
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    Yeah, I mean come on ... if an Afro is capable of blocking the chalk board, so are a lot of styles that have nothing to do with an Afro, as AdT just pointed out. Plus, this ignores the obvious fact that plenty of Afros are short and, like any short style, won't block much of anything. How silly.

    I'm one of many people who has "big hair" without any kind of Afro. Even straightened (as straight as I can get it anyway) it appears big. So I could see where "big hair" in general could be distracting. But it's some kind of crap for a school to single out one group of peoples' hair styles if the main issue is just "blocking the chalk board" :roll:
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,275Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Seriously. If hair is such a distraction they should require all students be bald.
  • CurlyInTheFogCurlyInTheFog Posts: 876Registered Users
    I think poxyfairy meant the school did them a favor because she's in a much better school now.

    I don't see the point of having dress codes if a) you're not going to enforce them uniformly (last year vs. this year); b) you're not going to enforce them with staff; c) you don't have a good reason for them, especially in light of what the school is ostensibly trying to accomplish.

    Paddling is not uncommon in some private schools, especially religious ones. I refused to enroll my son in an otherwise good school because they had a paddling policy. I also grew up in the era of public school corporal punishment, and believe me, we behaved, but most of us were scared sh*tless of the teachers who spanked, shook, rapped knuckles with the ruler, etc. My second grade teacher was a tyrant. If the only way you can maintain order is to terrify your students, then you shouldn't be teaching. It sounds to me like that family is well shut of that school.
    3a/b, F, normal porosity

    Suave conditioner, LAL gel
  • SpiralSpunkSpiralSpunk Posts: 243Registered Users
    I think poxyfairy meant the school did them a favor because she's in a much better school now.

    I don't see the point of having dress codes if a) you're not going to enforce them uniformly (last year vs. this year); b) you're not going to enforce them with staff; c) you don't have a good reason for them, especially in light of what the school is ostensibly trying to accomplish.

    Paddling is not uncommon in some private schools, especially religious ones. I refused to enroll my son in an otherwise good school because they had a paddling policy. I also grew up in the era of public school corporal punishment, and believe me, we behaved, but most of us were scared sh*tless of the teachers who spanked, shook, rapped knuckles with the ruler, etc. My second grade teacher was a tyrant. If the only way you can maintain order is to terrify your students, then you shouldn't be teaching. It sounds to me like that family is well shut of that school.

    I just assumed that corporal punishment was illegal these days - just learned that it is legal for public schools in 19 states and private schools in 48.

    Your second grade teacher is the exact reason why I wouldn't give that permission to a teacher or school. Reminds me of the movie/musical Matilda. You're right students should not be terrified of teachers.

    This family was given the push they needed to leave that (awful IMO) school.
  • adthomasadthomas Posts: 5,525Registered Users
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    Still, I wonder if they just plan to throw more shade in the form of that "hygiene" policy. ... The family says they received no apology. What the frig?

    At least this sets an informal precedent for future schools that wanna pull this stunt. Good work Parker family :D
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    They seem to have a strange definition of 'amended' - that's a totally different policy!
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    Some people just don't think, from another forum in respect of a different hair story (college male with native American heritage being told to cut his hair)
    "Before I clicked on the article I was expecting to see a huge afro, or perhaps frizzy dreadlocks. Something that looks unkempt, really. But his hair is pristine and pretty discreet. I hope the school comes to their senses."
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    LOL whoever made that remark is a complete dolt - sounds like a case of one straight-haired person complimenting someone else with straight hair (and pathetically slamming others to feel better about him/herself).

    As for the Natives, they've been pressured to chop down their locks since this country was "founded".
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    Korkscrew wrote: »
    LOL whoever made that remark is a complete dolt - sounds like a case of one straight-haired person complimenting someone else with straight hair (and pathetically slamming others to feel better about him/herself).

    As for the Natives, they've been pressured to chop down their locks since this country was "founded".

    Having been pulled up and had the Tulsa story linked to, they (caucasian wavy I think) now say
    "I meant 'unkempt' from the school's point of view. Obviously the new coach was concerned about the school's squeaky clean image, and I can see how someone like that would be prejudiced against hair that is out of the ordinary.

    Of course I'm not saying that afros or dreadlocks are bad choices. But someone who is ignorant about anything other than caucasian hair could easily jump to the wrong conclusions. They might see an afro and think 'unkempt!', or dreadlocks and think 'dirty hippy!'. I'm very glad the school has reconsidered
    ."
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,275Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Oh for pity's sake. Do they live under a RoCK??
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    Having been pulled up and had the Tulsa story linked to, they (caucasian wavy I think) now say
    "I meant 'unkempt' from the school's point of view. Obviously the new coach was concerned about the school's squeaky clean image, and I can see how someone like that would be prejudiced against hair that is out of the ordinary.

    Of course I'm not saying that afros or dreadlocks are bad choices. But someone who is ignorant about anything other than caucasian hair could easily jump to the wrong conclusions. They might see an afro and think 'unkempt!', or dreadlocks and think 'dirty hippy!'. I'm very glad the school has reconsidered
    ."

    Silly rabbit sounds like Joe Biden on an extra talkative day. It's a case of an adult caught with his hand in the cookie jar, and serving up a childish excuse.
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    I think poxyfairy meant the school did them a favor because she's in a much better school now.

    I don't see the point of having dress codes if a) you're not going to enforce them uniformly (last year vs. this year); b) you're not going to enforce them with staff; c) you don't have a good reason for them, especially in light of what the school is ostensibly trying to accomplish.

    Paddling is not uncommon in some private schools, especially religious ones. I refused to enroll my son in an otherwise good school because they had a paddling policy. I also grew up in the era of public school corporal punishment, and believe me, we behaved, but most of us were scared sh*tless of the teachers who spanked, shook, rapped knuckles with the ruler, etc. My second grade teacher was a tyrant. If the only way you can maintain order is to terrify your students, then you shouldn't be teaching. It sounds to me like that family is well shut of that school.

    I just assumed that corporal punishment was illegal these days - just learned that it is legal for public schools in 19 states and private schools in 48.

    Your second grade teacher is the exact reason why I wouldn't give that permission to a teacher or school. Reminds me of the movie/musical Matilda. You're right students should not be terrified of teachers.

    This family was given the push they needed to leave that (awful IMO) school.

    People are doing such a huge push on charter schools (and trying to do public schools in) now so they can place their child in a school that allows punishment or doesn't but fills some other need(s) they think public is failing at. Many parents have no problem with CP. I went to school where teachers would hang 4 or 5 different paddles on the wall, and pick which ever one suited their mood. Only 2 were really out of their mind and paddled kids for no good reason, regularly. The others would try other forms of discipline first and when that didn't work, they wore you out. No one was scared of them or their paddles, but one had a (rather uncomfortable) tail she would make you wear and walk at the back of every line in. We all hated that, and would rather take a beating, but then again 98% of us were spanked at home so it was normal.

    This story however is no where near normal.

    I have no love for dress codes, would not have survived one, and including hair is beyond ridiculous imo. There is absolutely nothing distracting about a natural hair, dreads, spikes, hawks, different colors, down to your butt, etc... It's hair, and often times a form of expression or part of your culture. Who cares? If you can't look past someones hair, you've got a problem.

    (ps- I live near 2 reservations and went to regular old public schools with any and every type of hair do you can imagine. the only time hair was an issue was when it had lice in it. So stupid)
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • ms_chellemms_chellem Posts: 10Registered Users
    I remember I worked at a restaurant a few years ago and it was a fine dining restaurant at that. So I decided to get the dread extensions and I was asked to take them out because its not professional and they had a rule against hairstyles. Being that I was one of the only african American working there I felt like I was being picked on in a way because everybody else that I worked with will load their hair with gel and spike up their hair or put it in a mohawk. So I guess depending on the environment people will have issues with afros and locs.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using CurlTalk App
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    That's crap. If they could wear mohawk and spiky hair, I truly don't get what would have been wrong with your dread extensions. How silly :sad3:
  • BluebloodBlueblood Posts: 1,748Registered Users
    ms_chellem wrote: »
    I remember I worked at a restaurant a few years ago and it was a fine dining restaurant at that. So I decided to get the dread extensions and I was asked to take them out because its not professional and they had a rule against hairstyles. Being that I was one of the only african American working there I felt like I was being picked on in a way because everybody else that I worked with will load their hair with gel and spike up their hair or put it in a mohawk. So I guess depending on the environment people will have issues with afros and locs.
    The only people who have issues with afros and locs are racists and self-haters.

    Locs can be tied up.

    Afros can be tied up if they are long.

    I use to know chefs who had locs and that's what they did out of habit.

    Short afros don't get into food like other short hair.

    So they don't have any hygiene excuse.
  • abstractcurlsabstractcurls Posts: 380Registered Users
    This made me so mad when it was on the news. There was absolutely nothing wrong with her hair! I've seen how little girls dress for school... I think maybe they should focus on that and leave her alone.

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