CurlTalk

Is obesity a disease?

Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
The AMA has declared that obesity is a disease. What does that mean now? More insurance coverage? If it's a disease, does it mean it can be disabling (i.e. eligible for SSI)? Boards I'm on are really blowing up over this....
«1

Comments

  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users
    Yes...yes it is.
  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,495Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    If labeling it a "disease" is going to reduce its rate of occurrence and help find a cure, then let's label it a disease. Whatever needs to be done.

  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,270Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I also think it may be so that more people get help because insurance might cover it. However this does not guarantee that as the org does not have that kind of authority. I jut think it might help. Sure would live help with my WW bill. (And I am one on the side of it's as much a disease -and tied to- as any addiction and/or mental disorder.)
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
    It doesn't seem to me that it is a disease, but definitions of disease vary widely.

    However, if labeling it that way helps people get insurance coverage, I'm all for defining it that way.
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Myradella3 wrote: »
    The AMA has declared that obesity is a disease. What does that mean now? More insurance coverage? If it's a disease, does it mean it can be disabling (i.e. eligible for SSI)? Boards I'm on are really blowing up over this....
    What are they blowing up over? I don't understand.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • rouquinnerouquinne Posts: 13,498Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    when i read the story on CNN, i took a scroll through the comments below.

    bad idea....

    not a single one showed any compassion or understanding, all were some variation of "stop stuffing yourself and work out".

    i wouldn't be surprized if that's happening everywhere this is under discussion.

    :(
    My blog:

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Flabellatestarossa.blogspot.ca%2F" class="Popup

    Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
  • Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    Myradella3 wrote: »
    The AMA has declared that obesity is a disease. What does that mean now? More insurance coverage? If it's a disease, does it mean it can be disabling (i.e. eligible for SSI)? Boards I'm on are really blowing up over this....
    What are they blowing up over? I don't understand.

    Folks saying crap like "it's not a disease, just back away from the table". That started the others fussing. Then one person talked about the drain on society they're being and will be even more so if folks start getting SSI for being fat. The civil folks expressed that it being a disease will be a cop-out for folks who could do better.
  • Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
    rouquinne wrote: »
    when i read the story on CNN, i took a scroll through the comments below.

    bad idea....

    not a single one showed any compassion or understanding, all were some variation of "stop stuffing yourself and work out".

    i wouldn't be surprized if that's happening everywhere this is under discussion.

    :(

    I think that saying eat less and exercise is the cure for obesity is like saying the way to end teen-age pregnancy is to tell the teens not have sex. It's just not that simple. How sad that more folks - obese or not - don't understand that.
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
    No argument with anything anyone has said here, but still don't see how in most cases it is a "disease." Am I taking the definition too literally? What about Sumo wrestlers and others who choose to be obese for whatever reasons? Can a person be obese and not be ill?
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Myradella3 wrote: »
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    Myradella3 wrote: »
    The AMA has declared that obesity is a disease. What does that mean now? More insurance coverage? If it's a disease, does it mean it can be disabling (i.e. eligible for SSI)? Boards I'm on are really blowing up over this....
    What are they blowing up over? I don't understand.

    Folks saying crap like "it's not a disease, just back away from the table". That started the others fussing. Then one person talked about the drain on society they're being and will be even more so if folks start getting SSI for being fat. The civil folks expressed that it being a disease will be a cop-out for folks who could do better.
    The interesting thing about that thinking is that obese people are already a drain on society in the ways those people are talking about. Who do they think is paying for care for all the resulting diseases? It's crazy that we're willing to pay for medications for diabetes and high cholesterol but we can't cough a small fraction of that amount to pay for a nutritionist or exercise consultant. And god forbid we help these sloths with diet medications because that makes it easier to get past something that's their own damn fault.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    My father was in the percentile of "morbidly obese" when alive, and it was absolutely a disease, in his case. He had a deeply rooted eating disorder that stemmed from a bad and often impoverished childhood, and Vietnam. According to family members, he had the eating disorder long before his metabolism slowed and he started putting on weight. Then came diabetes, and it was determined the cause was exposure to agent orange in his case. Of course is eating disorder did not help. The last 10 years of his life his legs stayed swollen 4 times his normal size, and covered in diabetic sores. He could not exercise if he wanted.

    There are always many contributing factors. I think it is hard to say obesity is a disease, in every single case, but I think it's safe to say it is in several.

    I wonder what type of insurance regulations will be put in place now, while diagnosing and treating the disease.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • rouquinnerouquinne Posts: 13,498Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    curlypearl wrote: »
    Can a person be obese and not be ill?

    *raises hand*

    i have none of the problems supposedly associated with obesity.
    My blog:

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Flabellatestarossa.blogspot.ca%2F" class="Popup

    Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
  • theliothelio Posts: 5,374Registered Users
    I think diseases can led to obesity or cause obesity, but i dont think obesity itself is disease. I do think more things should be made available to help people maintain healthy lifestyles and diets. it shouldnt be cheaper to buy unhealthy foods instead of healthy food. fresh whole foods should be made available to everyone. If everyone had access to healthcare the whole obesity issue facing america would probably go down because people could go to the nutritionist, the right doctors, ect, to get the right information and can learn what is causing their weight. I had a friend who found out she had a tyroid problem. If she had insurance sooner she could had dealt with her medical problems and obesity sooner.

    But honestly, will labeling it as a disease help people get access to help easier? drug addiction has been labled a disease and treatment is no easier to get. people rather kids go hungry, or die from illness if that will prevent them from having to pay out more money. i dont think they care much about people with obesity either.
  • SunshineGrrlSunshineGrrl Posts: 3,823Registered Users
    I think it can and cannot be a disease. Like there are genuine hereditary factors.

    I've been sick for months (well years, but most recently more sick) because of medications they've put me on for epilepsy. It's made me nauseated and vomiting since March. I've lost approximately 5 pounds people. Five. I have joked before that I was sedentary and ate crap, but honestly, I ate good food with a really, really rare crap food thrown in because, let's face it...the healthy food wasn't helping me lose weight, was it? I did yoga, I walked, it was vigorous exercise.

    I ate fruits, veggies, healthy food and not the store bought kind, the kind I made for myself (my SIL is a physician's assistant who specializes in nutrition, my brother works in public health specializing with childhood obesity, we've got the knowledge needed to try and fix obesity in our family, but it still runs rampant), my scale didn't budge. When I got sick and couldn't keep food down, the only thing I could keep down was ginger ale and still my scale didn't budge. I didn't and couldn't eat more than a couple bites of food a day for months and my scale didn't budge.

    I'm pretty sure that obesity can be termed a disease for some people. It's not because I sit and stuff my face and have no self control and can't push myself away from the table. I know portion size, I manage my portions. Until recently, I was very active and nothing helped my weight.

    I think it's a good and not so good thing for them to declare obesity as a disease. I don't want it as a crutch. It's something I have to live with as well as all my other health problems. I got the genetic lottery of all the health problems in the family, obesity is the least of my worries (and no, the medical problems are not related or caused by obesity. Some might improve by losing weight, but like I've said, that isn't really happening no matter what I do, so it's a moot point).

  • cailincailin Posts: 898Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    SunshineGrrl, thanks for your post.

    I know a lot of people who eat right, exercise and still can't lose weight. So instead they've decided to be the healthiest they can with out worrying about the size of their clothes. In their case, labeling obesity a disease is just fat shaming. Since you can not tell someone's health by how they look, I'd like to know how they are deciding someone has the "obese" disease. Is it by BMI? Are we going to tell nearly every professional athlete they have the obesity disease?

    If you want to treat disease then treat disease, get a fact-based medical diagnosis and treat it.

    If I walked into my Dr's office and she started prescribing me diabetes meds, HPB meds, cholesterol meds all by how I looked with out drawing one single drop of blood I'd walk out. And rightly so, because you can't diagnose illness by looking at someone. "Obesity" is not a diagnosis.

    True story: My sister when she was a teenager was "diagnosed" by an actual medical Dr with "hand and mouth" disease. ie she's only overweight because she's a greedy lazy good for nothing. Flash forward a few years she had PCOS, a tumor on her pituitary gland which all lead to untreated type II diabetes.

    Dr's discriminate against fat people, I feel like this obesity disease will make it easier to continue that.
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,270Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    Myradella3 wrote: »
    The AMA has declared that obesity is a disease. What does that mean now? More insurance coverage? If it's a disease, does it mean it can be disabling (i.e. eligible for SSI)? Boards I'm on are really blowing up over this....
    What are they blowing up over? I don't understand.

    Well I've seen a lot of "fat people are just lazy". Which says to me they've never been much overweight.
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,270Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    curlypearl wrote: »
    No argument with anything anyone has said here, but still don't see how in most cases it is a "disease." Am I taking the definition too literally? What about Sumo wrestlers and others who choose to be obese for whatever reasons? Can a person be obese and not be ill?

    I'm obese. If you saw me you probably wouldn't say I was. I eat healthier than most people. Still I have to go to WW. and this time I have to stay. I know how to eat. I know what to do. But when I get away from support I go up. But I can afford it. Just barely. Many cannot. To me it is like being an alcoholic in ways. Indeed my feelings. I know I do. I have pressures with an elderly parent and no support network. And while the smart me says "you can control what you eat" the hurt me is very powerful and I return too making bad choices. Anyhow. It's just that its not as easy as people make out and it's not just about being lazy. There is even very much science to prove that hedonistic eating is baked into us and therefore it's always a struggle.
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,270Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    rouquinne wrote: »
    curlypearl wrote: »
    Can a person be obese and not be ill?

    *raises hand*

    i have none of the problems supposedly associated with obesity.

    Me either. Yet. But there is just about no guarantee we won't. When you think about it how many elderly obese people do you see?
  • ZinniaZinnia Posts: 7,339Registered Users
    Actually, I have seen quite a few overweight/obese (how is this being defined?) in different cities.
    Life shrinks or expands according to one's courage. Anais Nin
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    Obesity has been classed as a disease in its own right by the rest of the western world for years, the World Health Organisation certainly does. You may be able to be obese and be asymptomatic but it is highly unlikely many are obese and fit the criteria for health (exceptions might include those who maintain a high muscle mass for sport or aesthetic reasons, eg. bodybuilders). 'Symptoms' are not the only way you know someone's body is under stress, there are also 'signs' (can be found with medical/ fitness tests). Bodyfat is highly active tissue, it alters levels of hormones it doesn't simply sit there.

    Anyone who wants to point the finger might want to look at the lifestyle habits of their own family, colleagues and friends first, and consider the HUGE contribution of lifestyle factors to most health problems they will encounter from atopic eczema to most instances of cancer to winter respiratory infections.

    Even people who pat themselves on the back for heading to the gym regularly often do not hit 10,000 steps every day, most people who claim to eat healthy actually don't eat a balanced and varied wholefood diet at all. I almost never see a client who hits ALL our (UK, work in lifestyle healthcare) healthy eating guidelines, and the guidelines are far from representing optimum nutrition they are simply minimums/ maximums.

    Unless the US has a different definition, healthy is Body Mass Index 20 to 24.9, overweight BMI 25 to 29.9, obese is BMI 30+ (World Health Organisation). Many women who maintain a weight in the healthy range do not have a healthy body fat percentage ('skinny fat'). For an average height female (5'5") that means a weight of 180 pounds or above.
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • rouquinnerouquinne Posts: 13,498Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    cailin wrote: »
    ... labeling obesity a disease is just fat shaming. Since you can not tell someone's health by how they look, I'd like to know how they are deciding someone has the "obese" disease.

    i don't think it's fat shaming.

    i have PCOS and was asymptomatic until my early 30s. when i started to gain weight, it was when the Fen-Phen combination came on the market and i was just sent to an endocrinologist and given that - without any tests.

    it wasn't until a serious menstrual hemorrhage that they did the tests that discovered a severe testosterone imbalance and then they threw more drugs at me. the high-dose estrogen and steroids caused me to pack on the pounds like you wouldn't believe.

    the problem is...

    to the world out there - all they see is the fat.

    and they assume that this means that i am scarfing down cookies, cake, chips, ice cream, fries, fast food.

    they assume that i'm lazy and undisciplined and that i smell.

    i have had people oink at me in the street when i had the moon face that accompanies prednisone. guys think it's funny to yell "hey fatty, get off the street" when they drive by when i'm crossing the road.

    the world does MORE than it's fair share to "fat shame".
    Dr's discriminate against fat people, I feel like this obesity disease will make it easier to continue that.
    my doctor in Ottawa was like that - she told me to my face that "all my problems" were because of my weight.

    this is when i went to her after a year where my father died, my boyfriend dumped me and i lost not one, but two jobs and i was suffering horrendous depression.

    my doctor here has never once mentioned my weight or suggested anything to me. he can see that i have none of the "co-morbidities" associated with the syndrome.

    and while i don't eat all those bad foods, i do now have a problem eating too much of the right ones. when i went to Vineet (my family doctor) about getting a gastric bypass, i told him he would be very proud of me if he saw the contents of my fridge and cupboards.

    but our society only sees "a fat chick".
    chupie wrote: »
    When you think about it how many elderly obese people do you see?

    my dad's parents were both obese and lived to be 80 and 81.

    and my mom's stepmother (aka Nana) survived flesh-eating disease when she was 79, precisely because she was obese. being slightly overweight is actually supposed to be a benefit when one is in their 70s and beyond. since many illnesses at that age tend to cause one to lose weight, those who have more weight to start are likely to live longer.

    studies in Canada, Australia and several other countries, and a review of all such studies by the Journal of the American Medical Association earlier this year indicate this benefit.

    please note that this relates to being "moderately overweight" NOT obese. obesity is still linked to early death at all ages.

    "Body Mass Index & Survival in Men & Women Aged 70 to 75" : Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, May 2010
    My blog:

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Flabellatestarossa.blogspot.ca%2F" class="Popup

    Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
  • multicultcurlymulticultcurly Posts: 5,132Registered Users
    It seems as if many doctors and people in general have this idea that all of us are naturally slim. There are people who are naturally large and what some of us would call slightly overweight, who are supposed to be that size. I am not talking about morbidly obese; I am talking about people who no matter how well they eat or exercise, they are always 20 to 50 pounds more than what society thinks they should be. These people tend not to have health problems associated with being overweight because that is the size they are supposed to be.
    3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
    HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
    Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed
  • multicultcurlymulticultcurly Posts: 5,132Registered Users
    I don't think obesity should be label as a disease for most people. There are those who really do seem to have a disease where they can't control what or how they eat, but I don't think that is the issue for most people. However, we should have more preventative care and help in losing weight like another poster mentioned, nutritionists and counseling help, as well as someone helping people find easy ways to be more active. Usually people who have problems with food don't really know how to change and that is what insurance should help with.
    3b/c, medium-coarse, low porosity, high density
    HG: Jessicurl Too Shea and Kinky Curly Curling Custard
    Shampoo: nonsulfate shampoo and Suave Naturals sulfate shampoo when needed
  • Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
    Rou and others - I had a doctor tell me that I just had to watch what I eat. I said that something else is going on. She said it was menopause and that I needed a new outlook. She suggested buying a dog or altering my drive to work to spark up my life. Within a month of that visit, my goiter and thyroid malfunction was diagnosed. How frustrating.

    A year after the thyroidectomy, I was down 50 pounds. All 50 weren't directly related to the thyroid and metabolism issues, but my mood was so apathetic and self loathing before surgery, that I couldn't diet. I wasn't worth it. Nothing mattered. But once I got stable, I cared. I could exercise and eat eat properly. Obese people understand that. They understand me eating potato chips and ice cream for breakfast while in tears that I was eating potato chips and ice cream for breakfast.

    Obesity is really complex.
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    thelio wrote: »
    I think diseases can led to obesity or cause obesity, but i dont think obesity itself is disease. I do think more things should be made available to help people maintain healthy lifestyles and diets. it shouldnt be cheaper to buy unhealthy foods instead of healthy food. fresh whole foods should be made available to everyone. If everyone had access to healthcare the whole obesity issue facing america would probably go down because people could go to the nutritionist, the right doctors, ect, to get the right information and can learn what is causing their weight. I had a friend who found out she had a tyroid problem. If she had insurance sooner she could had dealt with her medical problems and obesity sooner.

    But honestly, will labeling it as a disease help people get access to help easier? drug addiction has been labled a disease and treatment is no easier to get. people rather kids go hungry, or die from illness if that will prevent them from having to pay out more money. i dont think they care much about people with obesity either.

    This is what I was thinking too, Thelio. Several "diseases" have an underlying cause, and that has to be how they are defining it. At least that is what I am thinking, be it eating disorder, thyroid, medication related, etc.

    You are correct. Healthy food should cost less than processed crap and be accessible.

    I don't know. I have many questions about this. Will it stop some from getting insurance because they have a pre existing medical condition/illness (thats based on how thing currently run)? One of the food documentaries I watched recently said something about the millions of dollars "obese people and smokers" cost the USA every year, due to health care, and how that was a contributing factor to our debt. It's not as expensive as war, I know that much, but anywho...

    I also had questions about it being based on BMI, and what type of regulations might be imposed on some. That is already happening in some jobs. I personally know people who had to loose weight to keep insurance, they are now so thin they feel bad and unhealthy, and due to BMI they are being told it's still not enough. ETA: I have some major problems with that! I also have problems with the way smokers were treated on my job. So far that has been the only group forced to do something. They were sent a letter saying you have 2 1/2 weeks to quit. If you don't... Your insurance goes to 60/40 coverage rather than 80/20. I used to smoke. That is not enough time, and it has to be of someones free will and a solid self commitment or it will not last.

    The questions you asked are good ones. Would they get treatment?

    And what would this treatment consist of?
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • chupiechupie Posts: 5,270Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    As of Jan 2014 you can no longer be denied insurance on account if pre-existing conditions. Nor can your insurance be more than that of a healthy applicant.
  • Corrina777Corrina777 Posts: 3,193Registered Users
    I've been away from the boards for a while because I was on vacation, so I'm a little late on this, but feel the need to add my two cents.
    Yes, obesity is complex. It's not always a matter of eat less and move more. And it's about way more than BMI. According to the BMI chart, I'm obese. Looking at me, most people would never call me obese- heavy, solid, curvy, sure. I'm also extremely active- weight lifting 3-5 days a week, martial arts 3-5 days a week. I'm in excellent shape, by any standard except the number on the scale. And that's where many traditional diets end up failing me. The assumption that fat people just need to eat less and move more means that the majority of diet plans are based on this. Look at the big names- WW, Jenny Craig, Nutrisystem, etc. and their activity expectations and relative calorie intake. When I tried WW I had 30 daily points to use based on my weight. Most days I earned at least another 20-30 points from my activity level. There is no healthy way to manage that many points in a single day in a healthy way. So I continue to struggle with finding the right balance- in terms of nutrition and calories, to support my active lifestyle and still lose weight.
    In my mind, anything that encourages looking at obesity as more than combination of laziness and gluttony is a positive.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    3a/f/iii
    Modified CG since 11/5/11
    CLEANSE: CJ Daily Fix, DevaCare No-Poo, CHS Treatment Shampoo
    RO: SS Caitlin's Conditioner, CJ Beauticurls Strengthening
    LI: SS Repairing Protein Treatment, CHS Silk Leave-In
    STYLE: Re:Coil, Curl Keeper, Deva Ultra Defining Gel, Curls Rock Amplifier,Sweet Curls Elixirs Okra Gel and Hard Hold Gel, SS Curl Enhancing Jelly and Firm Hold Gel
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    chupie wrote: »
    As of Jan 2014 you can no longer be denied insurance on account if pre-existing conditions. Nor can your insurance be more than that of a healthy applicant.

    Thank you. I was not sure of the exact date, and to be honest I'm still in the not holding my breath or I'll believe it when I see it frame of mind. The squabbles and delays have been something else, to say the least.

    My job provided insurance is a nightmare at the moment. It is progressively (and rapidly) getting worse, and costing much more. No surprise considering mainly republican officials were elected. It's a rare occurrence in my county, but every time it happens raises get cut and we bend over.

    And Well at Work has been nothing but misleading for many.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Always@nightAlways@night Posts: 566Registered Users
    curlypearl wrote: »
    No argument with anything anyone has said here, but still don't see how in most cases it is a "disease." Am I taking the definition too literally? What about Sumo wrestlers and others who choose to be obese for whatever reasons? Can a person be obese and not be ill?

    I agree( and am confused )
  • gagirl09gagirl09 Posts: 2,316Registered Users
    *VERY LONG AND PERSONAL IMO*:
    I think obesity can be considered a disease. Taking away different organ issues or side effects of meds that can change weight, there have been several articles from research that shows that food can be addicting. Sugars/high fructose corn syrup can act as an excitogen(sp) and/or stimulate the pleasure center of our brain that can trigger a response similar to someone who is addicted to heroin/cocaine. Once the effect wears off you want more. Excitogens(sp) have been shown to stimulate hunger that is not actually real lead to overeaing. An example of such is MSG. The issue is with MSG and sugars both is that they are in many foods that are processed or easy to fix like tomato sauce, salad dressings, canned beans, buttery spreads. So if you cut these things out your body can react like AHHHHH what is going on?!?I This is because your brain wants that stimulation that came from the sugar/high fructose corn syrup and MSG and now it's missing and your grumpy and/or have headaches,shaky, rash breakouts and the list can continue and it wants the fix to make it stop as your body starts to flush the bad stuff out. Now I am obese and morbidly (97lbs overweight most recently) so at that and have struggled with my weight all my life. I actually lost 50 lbs back in January of this year. Food was not an issue it was something I had fun cooking but used it to fuel my body with important micro/macronutrients. I was on my way to losing the weight I needed. However I unexpectedly lost my job (due to a sloppily run school who illegally hired me [certification issues]) and guess what I have picked up 20 lbs because I started eating processed crap and stuff loaded with sugar or veg out all day. Now I eat a plant based diet/vegan and when I was working doing a job I loved food was not my center my students were. Once I was out of a job, what made me feel better everything that would did not have strong nutritional merit and calorie dense. I would know what not to eat but my brain keeps saying but it tastes so good and I am running out to get chips or whatever and when I eat I will feel BETTER(psychologically and sometimes physical). Now that sounds like an addict trying to get their fix and I believe I am a food addict and it is something I struggle with everyday. Also I want to add that even before I lost weight and became plant strong I too was one of those that had no health issues. Doctors would be amazed at my awesome blood pressure and cholesterol lack of diabetes even though it severely ran on my dad's side of the family. I ate white meat,no pork, fresh fruits and veggies, low and reduced fat diary products, and little sodas, and whole fiber rich grains. Also when I look at pics of myself when I was small (4-7 years old) I have a small frame. I say all that to say when people are not weight lifters, struggling with medical issues that effect their thyroids or cause weight gain from meds, I think that their can be an issue w/ food and it is linked to what we put in our mouths and also the ingredients in that food AND the emotional connection we are having with the food (happy/sad/angry). I like this film Hungry for Change where one of the commenters essentially says for those struggling with their weight "What's eating you?" Where are you feeling deficient in your life that is driving you not only to food but to the addictive food?" Once you identify that you try to break the cycle and it is a struggle for real. I started to get my weight back under control. I lost seven lbs in 2 weeks started feeling restless and upset and gained 10 lbs this week and have to start all over again. Just because of the yumm sensation of eating the wrong food and feeling psychologically "better." So yeah obesity can be a disease if those who struggle with it are addictive to food. Also look up the different names of MSG it has like 20+ different names (hydrolyzed protein, whey, calcium caseinate,gelatin, etc).
    Last relaxer: Nov. 24, 2008
    BC: December 19, 2009
    Products: Whatever works!
«1