CurlTalk

How to get your man to embrace/accept his curls

bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
Hey ladies, if you have a male significant other (husband, boyfriend, etc.) with curly hair and he has a hard time accepting. Pass this story along.

When I was 14, I went three months without cutting my hair and wound up with white man's 'fro with lots of curls. I got some compliments but mostly needling. There were a few male friends that said, "I looked like a girl." For the next 19 years, I went away from that look and went short and cropped, sometimes even buzzcut.

When I was 33, I started seeing male friends lose a lot of their hair so I got to thinking, "Well, maybe I should grow it out. I may not have it 20 years from now." I have thinned out some but then again I had a lot to lose. For the next seven years, I started going about 6-8 weeks between haircuts with curls really coming in after 3 1/2 weeks.

This past summer, I ended up going three months to really let the head of curls show. I even started using curl shapping spray from Garnier Fructis. Now I go every three months between haircuts and have my stylist leave it longer after cutting it.

I'm no product expert and every head of hair is different which is why I feel uncomfortable giving advice. Ladies, just remember, "getting your man to accept/embrace his curls is probably a bigger battle than finding the right products."

I'm just glad I finally came around to loving my curls in my early-to-mid-30s.

"Curls aren't just for girls."
2B always with potential of white man's fro

http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

"Curls aren't just for girls"
«1

Comments

  • HazelTesseraHazelTessera Posts: 11Registered Users
    I honestly wish that curly hair on guys was more accepted by other guys. My boyfriend of three years has the most handsome 3a/3b curls all over his head, and when he wears it curly, it's super sexy.

    However, he gets so many comments about how he looks "scruffy" and has a "man-fro" that every 2-3 months he goes in and gets it cut so short that all his curls disappear. I beg him every time not to; I tell him that he looks good with curly hair, but he wants to look "professional" (his words, not mine), so he does it anyway.

    I've tried to explain that he looks amazing with curly hair, but because he refuses to use any product at all on his hair (product, according to him, is girly), he gets frustrated fast with the volume of curl that results.

    I really wish that other people would stop razzing him about his hair and he would just grow to accept and like the hair he has, but I don't know if that will happen anytime in the foresee-able future.

    If any guys out there have any insight, I would be glad to hear it.
    • 2b/2c, medium thickness, high density, medium porosity, protein-loving, mid-back length hair
    • Olivella Professional Conditioner & Tresemme Naturals Moisture Conditioner: co-wash / leave-in
    • Smooth 'n Shine Curl Activator Gel & Fruit of the Earth Aloe Vera Gel: styling products
    • olive oil, coconut oil, & castor oil: occasional hair / scalp treatments
    • Aveeno Skin Relief Fragrance Free Body Wash: occasional 'cone-free, fragrance free 'poo
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    I honestly wish that curly hair on guys was more accepted by other guys. My boyfriend of three years has the most handsome 3a/3b curls all over his head, and when he wears it curly, it's super sexy.

    However, he gets so many comments about how he looks "scruffy" and has a "man-fro" that every 2-3 months he goes in and gets it cut so short that all his curls disappear. I beg him every time not to; I tell him that he looks good with curly hair, but he wants to look "professional" (his words, not mine), so he does it anyway.

    I've tried to explain that he looks amazing with curly hair, but because he refuses to use any product at all on his hair (product, according to him, is girly), he gets frustrated fast with the volume of curl that results.

    I really wish that other people would stop razzing him about his hair and he would just grow to accept and like the hair he has, but I don't know if that will happen anytime in the foresee-able future.

    If any guys out there have any insight, I would be glad to hear it.

    I gotta ask, how old is your boyfriend? The only reason I ask is because for me anyhow, when I got married, two years later I found myself taking the approach of, the hell with feeling the need to impress others.

    The way I transitioned was for 20 years I went every four weeks short and cropped. The next seven I went every 6-8 weeks semi-short. The last year, I go every three months and tell my stylist to "leave it longer" after cutting it.

    I'm finding that three months between haircuts is a perfect balance between "rocking the curls" and not letting it get out of control.

    Keep encouraging him but don't ram it down his throat. Not that you are but you get the idea. It's just that you can't force someone to get on board.

    Maybe tell him, "Curls aren't just for girls."
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    bobby wrote: »
    Hey ladies, if you have a male significant other (husband, boyfriend, etc.) with curly hair and he has a hard time accepting. Pass this story along.

    When I was 14, I went three months without cutting my hair and wound up with white man's 'fro with lots of curls. I got some compliments but mostly needling. There were a few male friends that said, "I looked like a girl." For the next 19 years, I went away from that look and went short and cropped, sometimes even buzzcut.

    When I was 33, I started seeing male friends lose a lot of their hair so I got to thinking, "Well, maybe I should grow it out. I may not have it 20 years from now." I have thinned out some but then again I had a lot to lose. For the next seven years, I started going about 6-8 weeks between haircuts with curls really coming in after 3 1/2 weeks.

    This past summer, I ended up going three months to really let the head of curls show. I even started using curl shapping spray from Garnier Fructis. Now I go every three months between haircuts and have my stylist leave it longer after cutting it.

    I'm no product expert and every head of hair is different which is why I feel uncomfortable giving advice. Ladies, just remember, "getting your man to accept/embrace his curls is probably a bigger battle than finding the right products."

    I'm just glad I finally came around to loving my curls in my early-to-mid-30s.

    "Curls aren't just for girls."

    It's great that you've come to accept your curls! Just seems like an uphill fight not to. Yeah, I've witnessed curly guys get teased for their curls. I wish more boys and men knew that teasing from other boys/guys is often a sign of jealousy. It reminds me of when guys who are gorgeous in a certain way are teased by other guys (called "pretty boys"). Yeah, they may be "pretty" but you all know it will turn a lot of women's heads.

    Curly hair is amazing on guys (then again, everything is amazing on guys). I wouldn't change a thing about my husband, who happens to look great. I love him dearly, but if he suddenly sprouted curls on his head I would probably jump for joy :blob:
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    Korkscrew wrote: »
    bobby wrote: »
    Hey ladies, if you have a male significant other (husband, boyfriend, etc.) with curly hair and he has a hard time accepting. Pass this story along.

    When I was 14, I went three months without cutting my hair and wound up with white man's 'fro with lots of curls. I got some compliments but mostly needling. There were a few male friends that said, "I looked like a girl." For the next 19 years, I went away from that look and went short and cropped, sometimes even buzzcut.

    When I was 33, I started seeing male friends lose a lot of their hair so I got to thinking, "Well, maybe I should grow it out. I may not have it 20 years from now." I have thinned out some but then again I had a lot to lose. For the next seven years, I started going about 6-8 weeks between haircuts with curls really coming in after 3 1/2 weeks.

    This past summer, I ended up going three months to really let the head of curls show. I even started using curl shapping spray from Garnier Fructis. Now I go every three months between haircuts and have my stylist leave it longer after cutting it.

    I'm no product expert and every head of hair is different which is why I feel uncomfortable giving advice. Ladies, just remember, "getting your man to accept/embrace his curls is probably a bigger battle than finding the right products."

    I'm just glad I finally came around to loving my curls in my early-to-mid-30s.

    "Curls aren't just for girls."

    It's great that you've come to accept your curls! Just seems like an uphill fight not to. Yeah, I've witnessed curly guys get teased for their curls. I wish more boys and men knew that teasing from other boys/guys is often a sign of jealousy. It reminds me of when guys who are gorgeous in a certain way are teased by other guys (called "pretty boys"). Yeah, they may be "pretty" but you all know it will turn a lot of women's heads.

    Curly hair is amazing on guys (then again, everything is amazing on guys). I wouldn't change a thing about my husband, who happens to look great. I love him dearly, but if he suddenly sprouted curls on his head I would probably jump for joy :blob:

    As far as accepting curls, I kind of see two sides. As a married 40-year old father of three, it's an easy sell that getting teased for curls is a sign of jealousy because I'm beyond the peer pressure thing. However, in my 20s I wasn't going to be convinced. Better late than never.:)
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • HazelTesseraHazelTessera Posts: 11Registered Users
    My boyfriend is 24.

    I think part of the problem is that his whole family had the same curl-pattern, more or less, & they all hate it. His dad & brother both cut their hair so that it's less curly, & his mom cuts hers short AND flat-irons it daily. So, even though I like his hair, I'm in the minority.
    • 2b/2c, medium thickness, high density, medium porosity, protein-loving, mid-back length hair
    • Olivella Professional Conditioner & Tresemme Naturals Moisture Conditioner: co-wash / leave-in
    • Smooth 'n Shine Curl Activator Gel & Fruit of the Earth Aloe Vera Gel: styling products
    • olive oil, coconut oil, & castor oil: occasional hair / scalp treatments
    • Aveeno Skin Relief Fragrance Free Body Wash: occasional 'cone-free, fragrance free 'poo
  • curlycurvy1curlycurvy1 Posts: 4Registered Users
    An afro doesn't necessarily need need to be a round microphone on the head. Men wanting to embrace a curly afro are best advice to keep the sides trimmed and the middle tall. In public, the slim profile and tall middle will make you look taller than you really are.

    A point of advice is to style the afro with some gel. This will make the shape of hair wind proof and less prone to loosing its edge.
  • DevushkaDevushka Posts: 1,080Registered Users
    Letting the curly-haired males in your life know how great having curly hair is, is an important thing to start doing early I think. My son, who's still in middle school, has wonderfully curly hair (3a-ish) that he likes to wear on the long side specifically because he thinks it helps give him the grunge rocker look that he wants. I regularly tell him how great his hair is and share with him proper curly hair care that I learn. (He knows allllllllllllll about hair scrunching, not using a terry cloth towel to dry his hair, not touching his hair while it dries to help keep it from frizzing, etc. :thumbright: )

    I'm just glad that I finally learned how to love my naturally curly hair and how to take care of it properly before my child reached the age when choosing the "look" for himself he wanted to present to the world. It makes me happy to see him want to show off his naturally curly hair and not worry about changing it to try and fit any general, societal standard.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]3b / Fine / Low (to Med) Density / Normal Porosity & Elasticity
    Currently Using [*Holy Grails*]
    Cleansers: DC No-Poo / DC Low-Poo / *BaSo & ACV*
    Co-Washes/ROs: CJ Beauticurls Argan & OO / DC OneC / Organicals DC Creme
    Additives: *Silk Amino Acids* / Honeyquat / Fragrance Oils
    LIs (found some!): KCKT / CJ Beauticurls LI / CJ Curl Assurance Smoothing Daily Condish
    DTs: *Coconut Oil* rinses / *Honey*, EVOO, & DC OneC / CJ Curl Rehab
    Sealer: *DM Super Buttercreme*
    Goal: APL Hair
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    Devushka wrote: »
    Letting the curly-haired males in your life know how great having curly hair is, is an important thing to start doing early I think. My son, who's still in middle school, has wonderfully curly hair (3a-ish) that he likes to wear on the long side specifically because he thinks it helps give him the grunge rocker look that he wants. I regularly tell him how great his hair is and share with him proper curly hair care that I learn. (He knows allllllllllllll about hair scrunching, not using a terry cloth towel to dry his hair, not touching his hair while it dries to help keep it from frizzing, etc. :thumbright: )

    I'm just glad that I finally learned how to love my naturally curly hair and how to take care of it properly before my child reached the age when choosing the "look" for himself he wanted to present to the world. It makes me happy to see him want to show off his naturally curly hair and not worry about changing it to try and fit any general, societal standard.

    That's refreshing to hear. I wore mine long in my early teens but after a while I saw it as a headache to take care of, plus as a guy I felt out of place with curly hair. Partly because I had no idea how to take care of it. And good for your son for not worrying about any societal looks.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • curlylifestylecurlylifestyle Posts: 77Registered Users
    Wavy/curly hair on guys is SO hot!! Some of my guy friends have wavy or curly hair that I'm constantly trying to get them to grow it out....when they do and right before they cut it, it looks so good!!
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    Devushka wrote: »
    Letting the curly-haired males in your life know how great having curly hair is, is an important thing to start doing early I think.

    Right on! ... And [slightly off-topic], we need to tell the females (especially daughters) that too.
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    Wavy/curly hair on guys is SO hot!! Some of my guy friends have wavy or curly hair that I'm constantly trying to get them to grow it out....when they do and right before they cut it, it looks so good!!

    When I was younger, I was told by some adults that I had gorgeous hair but for whatever reason the ones that teased me for it won out. Oh well, better late than never. I was asked by one person a couple weeks ago if my hair was permed, in an odd sort of way I'm kind of flattered.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • Firefox7275Firefox7275 Posts: 3,750Registered Users
    An afro doesn't necessarily need need to be a round microphone on the head. Men wanting to embrace a curly afro are best advice to keep the sides trimmed and the middle tall. In public, the slim profile and tall middle will make you look taller than you really are.

    A point of advice is to style the afro with some gel. This will make the shape of hair wind proof and less prone to loosing its edge.

    Isn't that just pandering to a different stereotype, men should be tall, lean and have short hair? Some people like the full afro look, some like longer flowing curly hair on men.
    2a-2c, medium texture, porous/ colour treated. Three years CG. Past bra strap length heading for waist.

    CO-wash: Inecto coconut/ Elvive Volume Collagen
    Treatments: Komaza Care Matani, coconut/ sweet almond/ fractionated coconut oils, Hairveda Sitrinillah
    Leave in: Fructis Sleek & Shine (old), Gliss Ultimate Volume, various Elvive
    Styler: Umberto Giannini jelly, Au Naturale styling gelee
    Flour sack towel, pixie diffuse or air dry.
    Experimenting with: benign neglect
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    I'm not trying to gang up on you, Curlylifestyle, but I do think Firefox makes an interesting point. Saying "You don't have to wear your afro round, wear it like this instead ... " is just more social pressure to conform to a certain look (including height, in this case).

    People do this to women all the time. One of my all-time favorites has to do with makeup. Women are sometimes encouraged to use certain make-up to achieve the "nude look". As if a bare face in and of itself is inherently flawed w/out some sort of cosmetic enhancement from the beauty industry. In the end these things are just more ways to try and convince people they can be "free" by following more rules.
  • curlicious13curlicious13 Posts: 1,632Registered Users
    This thread is truly an eye opener. I wouldn't have thought there was something wrong with men having curly hair because in some commercials I see guys with curls. The guys are mixed but still.
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    This thread is truly an eye opener. I wouldn't have thought there was something wrong with men having curly hair because in some commercials I see guys with curls. The guys are mixed but still.

    I think that largely depends on what generation you are from and I think having a larger bi-racial population means a greater likelihood for guys with curls.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • KatMackKatMack Posts: 60Registered Users
    I really agree about the generation thing Bobby my guy's dad, uncles etc hate his curls. They tell him every time we see them to cut his hair short enough that it doesn't curl and make sure to comb it because curls are not professional on men and he will never get promoted unless he "does something" about his hair. Everyone my age (friends/coworkers) always comment on how nice his hair is. Even my grandmother said something along the line of "he has such beautiful curls, what a shame to waste them on a boy" her own son has curly hair, but she would comb his for childhood pictures and curl my aunts hair for hers. It's such a shame because I find curly hair on men so attractive, especially when they know how to care for it.
    KAT
    ~Curly, Runner, Self-confessed Nerd~
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    2a no product/2b-c styled
    Low Porosity, Fine
    No poo-SM
    Co wash-VO5 kiwi lime*
    Rinse out- ION EC
    Leave in - Giovanni Direct then SM smoothie (ends only)
    Stylers-SM souffle topped with BRHG*

    Hair hates: glycerin (high dews here in TX)
    Hair likes: Coconut Oil*, protein

    *=HG
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    KatMack wrote: »
    I really agree about the generation thing Bobby my guy's dad, uncles etc hate his curls. They tell him every time we see them to cut his hair short enough that it doesn't curl and make sure to comb it because curls are not professional on men and he will never get promoted unless he "does something" about his hair. Everyone my age (friends/coworkers) always comment on how nice his hair is. Even my grandmother said something along the line of "he has such beautiful curls, what a shame to waste them on a boy" her own son has curly hair, but she would comb his for childhood pictures and curl my aunts hair for hers. It's such a shame because I find curly hair on men so attractive, especially when they know how to care for it.

    I think the "knowing how to care for it" is half the battle. The problem is (and I was guilty of this too as I mentioned before) too many shun curly hair. I was dropping my kid off at school one day. One of the parents I see alternates between flat ironing and going with her natural curls. We were talking one day and she was saying how it takes longer to flatiron than go with curls. Pretty much confirmed what I thought. Although, one day I got called in for a job interview but didn't have time for a haircut so for that reason I wanted it to look more orderly so I blow-dried it, styled it with a round brush and curled it. However most days, I towel and air-dry it. Then I'll use curl shaping spray gel and tousle it.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • GroYoFroGroYoFro Posts: 237Registered Users
    Yup, you got that right!

    "Girls love curls, but curls aren't just for girls" :D
    "Life is too short to keep your hair short"

    Click here to visit - GRO YO FRO!
  • curlylifestylecurlylifestyle Posts: 77Registered Users
    bobby wrote: »
    Wavy/curly hair on guys is SO hot!! Some of my guy friends have wavy or curly hair that I'm constantly trying to get them to grow it out....when they do and right before they cut it, it looks so good!!

    When I was younger, I was told by some adults that I had gorgeous hair but for whatever reason the ones that teased me for it won out. Oh well, better late than never. I was asked by one person a couple weeks ago if my hair was permed, in an odd sort of way I'm kind of flattered.

    Yea people are like that. We over think insults and forget compliments. I'm so glad you learned to live your curls can u post some pics of them
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    bobby wrote: »
    Wavy/curly hair on guys is SO hot!! Some of my guy friends have wavy or curly hair that I'm constantly trying to get them to grow it out....when they do and right before they cut it, it looks so good!!

    When I was younger, I was told by some adults that I had gorgeous hair but for whatever reason the ones that teased me for it won out. Oh well, better late than never. I was asked by one person a couple weeks ago if my hair was permed, in an odd sort of way I'm kind of flattered.

    Yea people are like that. We over think insults and forget compliments. I'm so glad you learned to live your curls can u post some pics of them

    I guess once I got to my early 30s, became married and had kids, in the back of my mind it allowed me to simply not care what others thought. I do have a gallery. Check out link below.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • GroYoFroGroYoFro Posts: 237Registered Users
    Is it not care what other think or you became more confident?? I think there is a difference...
    "Life is too short to keep your hair short"

    Click here to visit - GRO YO FRO!
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    GroYoFro wrote: »
    Is it not care what other think or you became more confident?? I think there is a difference...

    You're right, there is a difference but I think once you don't care what people think, you become more confident. With me that's how it worked out.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    Bobby, I agree. And I think one quality is an extension of the other. If you're confident, you care less about what others think. Or, if you care less about what others think, you're bound to be more confident.

    And sometimes - this has been true for me, anyway - you can start out faking confidence, and that can lead to the actual feeling of confidence.

    Years ago I stopped straightening my hair and didn't feel confident at all about it at first. I did care what others thought too.

    Instead of waiting for an attitude of confidence I just decided to pretend I was confident enough to grow out my natural hair. That play at confidence was what helped me actually go through with it - that plus some vague hope my hair would look half as decent as my sister's naturally curly hair LOL

    Sorry this is so wordy but I was thinking about anyone who thinks they actually need to be completely confident before starting their curly journey. The message is you really don't have to feel solid and confident at first. You can see it as an experiment and give yourself a chance to adjust to your natural hair. You can always go back to flat-ironing or whatever if it doesn't work out. For many of us, I think things do work out.
  • bobbybobby Posts: 669Registered Users
    Korkscrew wrote: »
    Bobby, I agree. And I think one quality is an extension of the other. If you're confident, you care less about what others think. Or, if you care less about what others think, you're bound to be more confident.

    And sometimes - this has been true for me, anyway - you can start out faking confidence, and that can lead to the actual feeling of confidence.

    Years ago I stopped straightening my hair and didn't feel confident at all about it at first. I did care what others thought too.

    Instead of waiting for an attitude of confidence I just decided to pretend I was confident enough to grow out my natural hair. That play at confidence was what helped me actually go through with it - that plus some vague hope my hair would look half as decent as my sister's naturally curly hair LOL

    Sorry this is so wordy but I was thinking about anyone who thinks they actually need to be completely confident before starting their curly journey. The message is you really don't have to feel solid and confident at first. You can see it as an experiment and give yourself a chance to adjust to your natural hair. You can always go back to flat-ironing or whatever if it doesn't work out. For many of us, I think things do work out.

    Very interesting perspective and I think that was/is largely true in my case. At first, I wasn't enormously confident wearing it longer but I faked it and the next thing I know, my confidence soared. I also think that participating and exchanging posts on this site has made me more confident as well. In fact, when I first started wearing it longer eight years ago, I was blowdrying it and styling it with a round brush. My hair had plenty of volume and wave but not necessarily curl like it does now.
    2B always with potential of white man's fro

    http://www.naturallycurly.com/curltalk/members/bobby-albums-my-album.html

    "Curls aren't just for girls"
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    bobby wrote: »
    This thread is truly an eye opener. I wouldn't have thought there was something wrong with men having curly hair because in some commercials I see guys with curls. The guys are mixed but still.

    I think that largely depends on what generation you are from and I think having a larger bi-racial population means a greater likelihood for guys with curls.


    Funny you brought up generations. I'm not much younger than you, was in high school from the late 80's- early 90's, am Gen X as well, and curly men were most of what I saw. I was just reflecting on the grunge scene

    Chris
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379040759.640254.jpg

    Eddie
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379040774.417767.jpg

    Layne
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379040790.493924.jpg

    just to name very few. We won't bring up hair bands of the 80's :-/

    There was a very even number of guys with curly hair and straight hair in my high school and in college. I've only dated 3 guys with straight hair and can only recall one who hated it. It seemed to be embraced, for the most part and most guys I know with straight hair, secretly wish they were curly.

    Maybe men having a hard time embracing their curls should keep that in mind.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    ^ One more side note on that. I remember being pissed in the early to mid 2000's when seeing pictures of Chris Cornell in magazines and in video's. His hair was always straightened

    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379046092.639865.jpg
    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379046246.288487.jpg

    Shame! And it doesn't just happen to the ladies.

    ImageUploadedByCurlTalk1379046279.020420.jpg

    That's more like it.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • KorkscrewKorkscrew Posts: 1,834Registered Users
    It's amazing how much of a difference a loss of curls can make to someone's image. Some of these celebs who decide to go from curly to straight end up almost unrecognizable; pedestrian. Maybe that's what some of these celebs want after a while - not to be recognized and not to be hassled.
  • Fifi.GFifi.G Posts: 15,490Registered Users
    Korkscrew wrote: »
    It's amazing how much of a difference a loss of curls can make to someone's image. Some of these celebs who decide to go from curly to straight end up almost unrecognizable; pedestrian. Maybe that's what some of these celebs want after a while - not to be recognized and not to be hassled.

    A lot of it is simply makeup artist/stylists following the trends of the time for shoots and videos. That was weird to see because the ones I mentioned were very leave me alone! Most still are. The ones who are still alive at least.

    *The time before that was full of men in makeup, lots of leather, outfits, teasing, etc. These guys were all, I'll be in the corner in my jeans and t shirt full of holes if you need me.
    When I hear terms like "hipster" I think, who told cliques they could leave high school??

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • SpidernoirSpidernoir Posts: 8Registered Users
    As a Black Male (from my experience) I'm constantly told, Black Men shouldn't grow their hair out. That curly afro hair is unprofessional and unkempt looking.

    I straightened it a few times because not because I hated afro hair no, but because I hated the way I look, because people kept telling me Black Men look handsome with short hair or bald, but whenever I cut it short or bald, I'd get: "Oh no you don't look Black enough to go Bald"....What ?

    Or as my mom puts it.....You look too Asianish/Nativish, and that ruins the Afro. Afro's don't look good you.

    So one time I shampooed my hair and for once I looked up while it was shampooed and noticed it was a combination of corkscrews and coils some the size of a big penspring and some the size of a pencil, with the top that is so loose it creates frizz and the only way to fix it is to finger curl.

    So I put gel in my hair and screw and coils formed and my mom looked at me and said "Oh you look handsome now" I just stared at her.

    So eventually after a while, I learned to love my hair in both afro state and kinky/curly/coily state. I like both the same, but everyone else prefers kinky curly/coily.
«1