Nothing That Hasn't Been Said Before...

SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
... but an interesting article. Some of the stuff these so-called intelligent students did made me go :shock:.

Parties Mocking Blacks Spark Outrage
By BRUCE SMITH, Associated Press Writer

4 hours ago

CHARLESTON, S.C. - White students at Tarleton State University in Texas hold a party in which they dress in gang gear and drink malt liquor from paper bags. A white Clemson University student attends a bash in black face over the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. A fraternity at Johns Hopkins University invites partygoers to wear "bling bling" grills, or shiny metal caps on their teeth.

From Connecticut to Colorado, "gangsta" theme parties thrown by whites are drawing the ire of college officials and heated complaints from black and white students who say the antics conjure the worst racial stereotypes.

At the same time, some black academics say they aren't surprised, given the popularity of rap music among inner-city blacks and well-to-do suburban whites alike.

The white students, they say, were mimicking the kind of outlaw posturing that blacks themselves engage in in rap videos. They suggest the white students ended up crossing the same line that says it is OK for blacks to call each other "****," but not all right for whites to do it.

Whites often don't realize their actions are offensive because they are imitating behavior celebrated in music and seen on television, said Venise Berry, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa who has researched rap music and popular culture.

"The segment of rap music that is glamorized and popularized by the media is gangsta rap," said Berry, who is black. "It has become an image that is normalized in our society. That to me explains clearly why they don't see it as wrong."

At an off-campus "Bullets and Bubbly" party thrown by University of Connecticut School of Law students in January, pictures showed students wearing baggy jeans, puffy jackets and holding fake machine guns.

The University of Colorado's Ski and Snowboard Club advertised a "gangsta party" in September, with fliers featuring rappers and fake bullet holes. The theme was dropped after complaints, but some students, who didn't get the message, showed up in gangsta garb, hoping to win prizes.

Often such parties go unnoticed outside campuses until students post pictures on Facebook.com and other Web sites. That's how images of the Clemson party surfaced this week. One student wore blackface; another white student put padding in her pants to make her rear end look bigger.

Harold Hughes, a black fraternity member at Clemson whose frat brothers attended the party, said white students "see this on MTV and BET they think it's cool to portray hip hop culture." Hughes said he found it especially offensive that the party was held over a holiday created to honor the slain civil rights leader.

Many white Clemson students said they did not believe the party was held to intentionally offend blacks, and after news of the party reached beyond the campus, organizers issued an unsigned letter of apology.

Still, school officials are investigating, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People said the party was not harmless fun.

"We once lynched African-Americans as good fun and humor," said Lonnie Randolph, president of the South Carolina chapter of the NAACP.

James Johnson, a black psychology professor at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington who has researched racial attitudes and teaches a seminar on race and prejudice, said he is more discouraged by the rap performers who perpetuate stereotypes than by the "clueless kids" who imitate them.

"In the civil rights movement, you didn't have blacks who called themselves `niggers' and who called their women `bitches' and `whores' and who glorified being violent and being thugs," he said. "Now these white kids are kind of confused."

These incidents come at a time racial tolerance on college campuses is perceived to be steadily improving. But the truth may be more complicated.

A University of Dayton sociologist who analyzed journals kept by 626 white college students found the students behaved substantially differently when they were in the company of other whites than when they were with other races.

When the students, who were asked to record their interactions with other people, were alone with other white students, racial stereotypes and racist language were surprisingly common, researcher Leslie Picca found. One student reported hearing the "n-word" among white students 27 times in a single day.

The results suggest white students have little sense of shame about racial insults and stereotyping and treat them as simply a part of the culture.

"This is a new generation who grew up watching `The Cosby Show,'" Picca said. "They have the belief that racism isn't a problem anymore so the words they use and the jokes they tell aren't racist."

Picca said she found it "heartbreaking" to see so many well-educated students perpetuating the stereotypes.
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Comments

  • MunchyMunchy Posts: 5,206Registered Users Curl Novice
    Great, my alma mater - University of CT.

    People wondered why I felt uncomfortable there as a non-basketball playing minority.
  • PartyHairPartyHair Posts: 7,713Registered Users
    The New York Times "Today in History" blurb was about the lunch counter sit-in staged by four Black college students in Greensboro, NC. I thought to myself when I read that, "How awful is it that racism was so totally accepted even in such modern times as 1960." Then I thought, "Idiot. It's pervasive NOW, in the 21st century!"

    HOW can people not get it? HOW can these stupid freaking college kids not think, "Hmmm, perhaps it is inadvisable for us to "dress up" like Black people and have a party?"

    Good grief. It isn't rocket science. Respect each other. Acknowledge and respect our similarities and our differences. Live and let live. Is that REALLY so hard?
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  • 2happy2happy Posts: 5,138Registered Users
    The kids do this all the time. Half the kids I know walk around saying the want/wish to be black. To me it shows the end of racism. The kids I know that act like this are growing up with no predjudices. Isn't that a good thing? Is it any different than wanting to look/act like Britney Spears - Farrah Fawcet (years ago) - Beyonce - Justin Timberlake, etc? Remember the Rachael hair cut everyone coppied? Now, don't get me wrong, I don't want my kid acting like a thugg, whether it be a black, white, yellow or brown thug. No thank you. To me, the thug look isn't exlusive to black. It's exclusive to thug.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or hump it.....Piss on it and walk away.
    Location - WI
  • AmnerisAmneris Posts: 15,117Registered Users
    I don't think the gangster/thug look represents Blackness at all, and I don't see anything positive in white kids "wishing they were Black" in terms of this type of image. It's sure not doing me any favours! I also think it is a cop-out to solely blame Black people for this annoying stereotype. Many of these university incidents did not involve gangsta rap images and not all involved Black people - one party also mocked Latinos, and there was the article about Asians at Princeton and the general anti-affirmative action rant on some other campus and the mock lynching.... I think it has a lot more to with ignorance and a lack of respect than rap music.

    I also think, while yes, Black people are involved in the dissemination of gangsta rap, we need to look at who is producing and advertising it and what they stand to gain from it, and who is buying it and what needs that music fulfils in them. It is not only Black people at those levels of the game. And how easy is it for Black people in other fields in life compared to the ones we are stereotyped into? It's a much more complex issue.
    Get used to me. Black, confident, cocky; my name, not yours; my religion, not yours; my goals, my own; get used to me. -Muhammad Ali


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  • 2happy2happy Posts: 5,138Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    I don't think the gangster/thug look represents Blackness at all, and I don't see anything positive in white kids "wishing they were Black" in terms of this type of image.

    I agree completely!
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or hump it.....Piss on it and walk away.
    Location - WI
  • 2happy2happy Posts: 5,138Registered Users
    Amneris wrote:
    I also think, while yes, Black people are involved in the dissemination of gangsta rap, we need to look at who is producing and advertising it and what they stand to gain from it, and who is buying it and what needs that music fulfils in them.

    I think the reason this music appeals to young kids is because it goes against what the adults want/say/preach/feel/think etc. The reason people write it, sing it, produce it, is because it makes them money. It's make money because the kids buy it.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or hump it.....Piss on it and walk away.
    Location - WI
  • wild_sasparillawild_sasparilla Posts: 4,306Registered Users
    The "being Black = being gangsta" thing is just lame. Anyone with half a brian knows rapping doesn't make you an honorary Black person or something - that said, a lot of my peers are walking around with less than half a brain. Good God, how do they still have motor skills?

    Anyway, I often daydreamed about being Black in a different way - actually having rich, chocolate brown skin and gorgeous type 4 hair and being how I imagined I would ideally look if I were Black. I also daydreamed about how I'd look if my hair hadn't darkened and I'd stayed blonde, if I had red hair and green eyes, if I had black hair and whatever eyes I liked that day, if I were Chinese, etc. I don't know what this says about me. I like my dark brown hair, fair skin and blue-green-gray eyes, I swear I'm not denying myself! :lol:
    OMG, LOOK!!

    ...It's a siggie. :shock:
  • ~Ghost Poster~~Ghost Poster~ Posts: 2,264Registered Users
    The "being Black = being gangsta" thing is just lame. Anyone with half a brian knows rapping doesn't make you an honorary Black person or something - that said, a lot of my peers are walking around with less than half a brain. Good God, how do they still have motor skills?

    Anyway, I often daydreamed about being Black in a different way - actually having rich, chocolate brown skin and gorgeous type 4 hair and being how I imagined I would ideally look if I were Black. I also daydreamed about how I'd look if my hair hadn't darkened and I'd stayed blonde, if I had red hair and green eyes, if I had black hair and whatever eyes I liked that day, if I were Chinese, etc. I don't know what this says about me. I like my dark brown hair, fair skin and blue-green-gray eyes, I swear I'm not denying myself! :lol:

    I would rather have a whole Brian...if he's hot, that is.

    Sorry I couldn't resist! :lol:

    I, too, agree that Black = gangsta is nothing positive, nor does wanting to emulate this lifestyle signal the end of racism. For every one who wants to "be black" there are two who hate Blacks and everything we represent.

    However, in the spirit of giving the benefit of the doubt, I don't think those statements were meant quite that literally and are probably being taken slightly out of context.
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  • LadyCurlyLocksLadyCurlyLocks Posts: 341Registered Users
    2happy wrote:
    Amneris wrote:
    I don't think the gangster/thug look represents Blackness at all, and I don't see anything positive in white kids "wishing they were Black" in terms of this type of image.

    I agree completely!

    ITA also! I live close to Clemson University, so this has been all over the news for the past week. I just wish some people would grow up. :?
    3B Corkscrew... I'm back on the boards now! Just got The Big Chop on Monday, pics coming soon.
  • 2happy2happy Posts: 5,138Registered Users
    I, too, agree that Black = gangsta is nothing positive, nor does wanting to emulate this lifestyle signal the end of racism. For every one who wants to "be black" there are two who hate Blacks and everything we represent.

    No, it won't end racism. What I meant is this younger generation coming up is probably the most.........searching for the right word.......um, color blind, sexual preference blind, religion blind, etc generation ever. I'm totally anti-gansta, as I said before. It's not a black issue- it's a 'thug' issue of all different colors. Now, I also think it's sad that what's drawing these kids to saying they wish they were black IS the gangster rap, but if you can find anything positive in it, it's the fact that this generation is much less racist. They're kids, they just simply think it's cool. They think it's cool to be black. In the 60's you were cool if you were a 'greaser' with a cig. pack rolled up in your sleeve. Sadly, I don't see a lot of 'greatness' coming from this generation, but if 'loving your neighbor' is something they accomplish, I'm glad about it. Looking at the positive side, it's one more step forward. IMO.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or hump it.....Piss on it and walk away.
    Location - WI
  • wild_sasparillawild_sasparilla Posts: 4,306Registered Users
    Whoops! Sorry, Brian, I didn't need to cut you in half! Just...some cerebellum... :?

    :lol:
    OMG, LOOK!!

    ...It's a siggie. :shock:

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