Peruvian plantain recipe

curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
Well my DD has a project to cook something for school and she picked Peru and chose plantains to make for her dish ( I don't even know if plantains are used there but it can't be undone now :P). I have never made plantains before so could someone recommend a method or recipe to make these so I don't mess them up? Also I don't know if the may be a Peruvian ingredient to add to make them more authentic. I am under a time crunch (it's due tomorrow) so your quickest attention is appreciated! TIA!
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Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

"I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

Comments

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Peruvians don't really eat plantains. They're potato people. :p
    Plantains are mostly eaten in the Caribbean and Central America (with Venezuela and Colombia being South American countries that also feature them).
    You'll often see tostones in Peruvian restaurants though because tostones are popular.
    You might do those, but they're not good made ahead of time.

    Too bad you didn't pick Colombian or even Ecuadorian. You could have done roasted ripe plantains stuffed with cheese. Absurdly easy and tasty enough cold.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    I'd just make roasted ripe plantains. It's still kind of reaching as far as authenticity, but Ecuadorians do it, and Peru and Ecuador are neighbors at least. And they share some dishes (they argue about ceviche and what country it really belongs to a fair amount, heh).
    Plus it's about the easiest thing you can make.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Yes as you probably figured my DD put much research into this project. I told with a little more research she could've picked the blue/purple potatoes which would've been cool. She just informed me that if she couldn't find something for Peru that she could choose her heritage and do something for that. She is part Mexican so that's a sure thing! Oh well.


    I don't feel like frying so could I possibly bake the plantains? And do I use the ripe ones?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Tostones must be fried. They're made with green plantains. And they're really very easy to fry. I just don't recommend making them. Not good unless freshly fried.
    Just make roasted ripe plantains.

    Ooh, wait, there is one thing that might work out better in terms of authenticity. Chifles! They're definitely eaten/made there. It's plantain chips. You'll have to fry, though. Unless you cheat and buy a bunch (they're readily available in grocery stores) and say you made them. :lol:
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Hmm chifles sound like a plan! Already made, they stay fresh AND I don't have to cook? Win! I doubt I could find them anywhere locally here though.

    I might make the baked sweet plantains. Any recommended seasonings aside from just salt?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    I usually don't even put salt on them. The simplest way is just peel, wrap in foil, bake.
    If you want them to be even tastier, though, put them in a baking dish/ roasting pan, rub or dot with butter, and sprinkle a little brown sugar then bake until caramelized.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    A little salt definitely gives a nice sweet and salty flavor, but like with baked sweet potatoes, baked sweet plantains are just one of the few things I find taste great without. It's up to you of you want salt.
    You can serve a slightly spicy sauce with them, but I don't think that would go over so well with kids, and you'd have to buy a few things. :p
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Is it possible to cut them into disks and bake them? I'm just thinking of portability here and ease of serving.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Bake them whole then slice them. Much easier than you having to flip a bunch of individual rounds.
    You might want to split them in half lengthwise, though, so they get even more caramelized.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    At what temp and for how long give or take? Sorry, I'm such a dolt about all this.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Around 400. Just until they're nice and caramelized. Maybe 30 minutes?
    Here is a Colombian recipe for cheese-stuffed baked plantains:

    BAKED PLANTAINS WITH GUAVA AND CHEESE (PLATANOS ASADOS CON BOCADILLO Y QUESO) | My Colombian Recipes
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    That sounds yum! Perhaps I'll have something new to make for the family now :)

    Thanks so much for your help Saria! :toothy10: My sanity (and procrastinating daughter) thank you too!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    You're welcome! Hope everyone appreciates your effort! :)
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • jmartinezjmartinez Posts: 126Registered Users
    I cook platanos in my house but the dominican way. I peel, cut into long slices and cook them in oil. I cut them the long way. I add lechera, thats a little mexican spin to it and eat. Mmmm guess im going to the grocery store

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  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Ugh, yeah me too! It's only 8:15 PM. I just have loads of time! :disgust:
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • jmartinezjmartinez Posts: 126Registered Users
    They are like a potato so if you cut them into disks you have to squish them so they can cook right. I use a can of soup to squish them because its heavy. Omg im hungry now.

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  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Oh, by the way, your daughter should mention they're usually eaten as a breakfast/brunch item and is more common in the jungle area.

    I was looking and it seems mostly it's that region of Peru. A woman mentioned that they'll stuff them with cheese, salty peanut butter, their style of chorizo, or cecina (dried meat). So, it is done in some parts of Peru!
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Well good to know she wasn't that far off lol! Honestly some of her friends are throwing the lamest stuff together so I think it is an assignment that just needs to be completed and handed in. It would've been nice for her to have done a bit more research though and she could've found something interesting to share. The fact that there are no heating facilities kind of limits what she could make anyway.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Heh, I'm kind of surprised that the teacher wouldn't have them research before committing to a project.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    I agree. It's not saying much when kids can just throw together something and call it a project. I guess it's a testament to the school system then! Unless my DD is playing down the project's importance. Dang kids!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Well I sliced them up and tried to get them brown on both sides in the oven. I think they may be drier than good ones are (I.e. fried) but I thought their flavor was good.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Oh, baked plantains are a separate thing from fried. I don't bake to get them like fried. Baked ones are baked whole or split lengthwise so they end up soft and moist (like a baked sweet potato) versus fried plantains which are thin and a little crisp. They're both good, but very different.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Also dryness could be due to not very ripe plantains. When they're not that ripe they're still dry and starchy. Ripe plantains are usually cooked when they're at least full of brown spots if not completely brown on the outside. Unless you're really lucky, it's hard to buy them that ripe. People usually let them ripen some more, which you didn't have time for. :)
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    Hubby bought pretty ripe ones. They were yellow with brown spots and were almost like unripe bananas to the touch where they were firm but still had some give. The one I tried was small so maybe the larger ones will be a bit more moist.

    I certainly hope my daughter has no PR or DR friends as I'm sure they might be disappointed at my interpretation lol. Live and learn I guess!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]2b/c, medium/high porosity, medium/coarse texture
    Current HG: Kinky Curly errythang, GVPCB, LALSG

    "I will never be the woman with perfect hair, who can wear white and not spill on it."

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