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Bizarre medical maladies-- fascinating or not?

SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
Wednesday on TLC is a special called "The Man with the 200 pound tumor." I shall be glued to the screen watching this. I love medical malady shows. Our bodies can really turn on us in some pretty awful ways.

So, do you find these shows interesting? Horrifying? Both?
TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



Comments

  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Both! I'm fascinated by medical stuff.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
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  • theliothelio Posts: 5,374Registered Users
    Both. I'm a science geek so stuff like that facinates me.

    But some of of it is horrifying. I havent seen the episode you are talking about, but dude!! how you not know about the tumor?? its sad when people are so hesitate about going to the doctors or cant afford to so they let things so until they are an episode on a medical show.
  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I don't think anyone loves hearing/reading about that kinda stuff more than I.

    But I'm somewhat conflicted over whether I should find entertainment in the suffering of others.

    It's not like I am a physician who is studying how to treat these peope; it's basically just a morbid curiosity to me. And I'm not sure that's OK.

  • The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,742Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    BOTH!
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  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    thelio wrote: »
    Both. I'm a science geek so stuff like that facinates me.

    But some of of it is horrifying. I havent seen the episode you are talking about, but dude!! how you not know about the tumor?? its sad when people are so hesitate about going to the doctors or cant afford to so they let things so until they are an episode on a medical show.
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    I think the human body and its functions and maladies are one the most interesting and amazing things in nature. Its complexity is staggering.
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  • Who Me?Who Me? Posts: 3,181Registered Users
    I don't think anyone loves hearing/reading about that kinda stuff more than I.

    But I'm somewhat conflicted over whether I should find entertainment in the suffering of others.

    It's not like I am a physician who is studying how to treat these peope; it's basically just a morbid curiosity to me. And I'm not sure that's OK.

    I think there's a difference between pure "entertainment" and satisfying curiosity and learning about the world. If we didn't try to learn about stuff by observing things, we'd just make up our own baseless stories to explain the natural world...and that's getting into a whole nother topic.

    Just because you're not studying the oddities as a physician doesn't mean you're not learning all kinds of things about the human body and the world when watching these kinds of shows.

    Has anyone else been to the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia? It's amazing.
    "I don't know! I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again!" -BART SIMPSON
  • Lucky CharmLucky Charm Posts: 1,250Registered Users
    I LOVE these shows! I have enough medical issues myself, but ironically, I love weird medical shows. It's so interesting to me, I'm amazed what the human body can produce. I'm starting out in the medical coding field and was in heaven in my clinical pathophisology and medical terminology classes.


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  • claudine19claudine19 Posts: 4,486Registered Users
    The Mutter Museum is one of my favorite places. I have a book about it, as well.
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  • roseannadanaroseannadana Posts: 5,632Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I find them horrifying! It looks like I am the only one. I see how it could be interesting in the name of science but these shows sometimes make me angry (and frightened!) that the doctors overlooked things early in the diagnosis.

    The tumor episode would not interest me but I am sometimes interested in rare disorders that are finally diagnosed. I feel sorry for people who have something so rare that only like ten people in the world have been diagnosed so there's no funding for research. :(

    I was born to be a pessimist. My blood type is B Negative.
  • curlysue21curlysue21 Posts: 5,219Registered Users
    claudine19 wrote: »
    The Mutter Museum is one of my favorite places. I have a book about it, as well.

    Is it in Philadelphia? I always wanted to go there while staying with my mom but I know she would be too weirded out by it.
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  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Who Me? wrote: »
    I don't think anyone loves hearing/reading about that kinda stuff more than I.

    But I'm somewhat conflicted over whether I should find entertainment in the suffering of others.

    It's not like I am a physician who is studying how to treat these peope; it's basically just a morbid curiosity to me. And I'm not sure that's OK.

    I think there's a difference between pure "entertainment" and satisfying curiosity and learning about the world. If we didn't try to learn about stuff by observing things, we'd just make up our own baseless stories to explain the natural world...and that's getting into a whole nother topic.

    Just because you're not studying the oddities as a physician doesn't mean you're not learning all kinds of things about the human body and the world when watching these kinds of shows.

    Has anyone else been to the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia? It's amazing.

    Whew, OK, I feel better now! LOL

  • theliothelio Posts: 5,374Registered Users
    Springcurl wrote: »
    thelio wrote: »
    Both. I'm a science geek so stuff like that facinates me.

    But some of of it is horrifying. I havent seen the episode you are talking about, but dude!! how you not know about the tumor?? its sad when people are so hesitate about going to the doctors or cant afford to so they let things so until they are an episode on a medical show.
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.

    Yikes! Yeah you tend to need a team of specialist to deal with that.

    Was he able to get in removed at the end or atleast see a doctor who knew what they were doing?

    I use to watch these shows, now I seldom have time to breath.
  • claudine19claudine19 Posts: 4,486Registered Users
    curlysue21 wrote: »
    claudine19 wrote: »
    The Mutter Museum is one of my favorite places. I have a book about it, as well.

    Is it in Philadelphia? I always wanted to go there while staying with my mom but I know she would be too weirded out by it.

    Yes, it is: one of the many reasons I love that city.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    Who Me? wrote: »
    I don't think anyone loves hearing/reading about that kinda stuff more than I.

    But I'm somewhat conflicted over whether I should find entertainment in the suffering of others.

    It's not like I am a physician who is studying how to treat these peope; it's basically just a morbid curiosity to me. And I'm not sure that's OK.

    I think there's a difference between pure "entertainment" and satisfying curiosity and learning about the world. If we didn't try to learn about stuff by observing things, we'd just make up our own baseless stories to explain the natural world...and that's getting into a whole nother topic.

    Just because you're not studying the oddities as a physician doesn't mean you're not learning all kinds of things about the human body and the world when watching these kinds of shows.

    Has anyone else been to the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia? It's amazing.

    Whew, OK, I feel better now! LOL

    LOL. It's like, YAY! I'm not a jerk! For me it's also about learning. I went to court reporting school because it was the fastest track to get me off welfare, but I really wanted to be a nurse. About 6 years ago I took all the prerequisites for nursing school and applied and got accepted. But that was the year the economy went south and I couldn't get student loans... they were just flat out refusing. And my credit was okay! So I watch all these medical shows and read all these medical books just for the heck of it.
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    thelio wrote: »
    Springcurl wrote: »
    thelio wrote: »
    Both. I'm a science geek so stuff like that facinates me.

    But some of of it is horrifying. I havent seen the episode you are talking about, but dude!! how you not know about the tumor?? its sad when people are so hesitate about going to the doctors or cant afford to so they let things so until they are an episode on a medical show.
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.

    Yikes! Yeah you tend to need a team of specialist to deal with that.

    Was he able to get in removed at the end or atleast see a doctor who knew what they were doing?

    I use to watch these shows, now I seldom have time to breath.

    Not sure! It's not on until Wednesday. But here's the link where I read about it:

    EXCLUSIVE Sneak Peek At TLC's 'The Man With The 200lb Tumor' (VIDEO)
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • Lucky CharmLucky Charm Posts: 1,250Registered Users
    Springcurl wrote: »
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.
    NF is a difficult disease. There are 2 distinct families of NF, type 1 and type 2. I'm more fluent in type 2 because I have that particular disease. NF2 causes lesions on the CNS and PNS - many tumors can be excised easily if caught early, but as they grow and embed themselves around nerves and into other organs, removal can cause more neurological damage than leaving the tumor where it is. Until the last decade or so, there wasnt much in the way of medical intervention for NF. These lesions are slow growing, so theyre often not caught until they are rather substantial in size. I'm not sure if the man had type 1 or 2, but I'm assuming since the tumor was so incredibly large, that it had been growing for many, many years. When the doctors first saw the tumor, it may have been so intertwined on nerves and other organs, they possibly couldnt remove it.
    Now that doctors and neurologists are more aware of NF (Nf is very rare and most doctors wont go near it), there are more areas of study and specialists who know how to manage the disease. A specialty team of doctors, routine full body MRIs, audiograms, etc. is an absolute must when treating this disease to ensure that cases like this are avoided.
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  • jeepcurlygurljeepcurlygurl Posts: 19,777Registered Users, Curl Ambassador Curl Virtuoso
    I'm fascinated. It's purely entertainment for me and I don't think of it as a learning experience at all. Not that I don't learn things, but that's not why I watch.

    Years ago there was a tv channel that showed surgical procedures. It was always late at night and I'm a night owl so I got to see all kinds of cool surgeries. One of my favorites was a cesarean. I'm not even interested in babies but I thought it was so interesting. The mom was awake and aware and they just cut her open and popped that baby right out!
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  • irociroc Posts: 7,890Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Both. I thought i'd seen this man, but maybe it was a different one.

    I watched the man with no face, and the man with tree hands, and the little mermaid girl (the kids ones make me cry)

    I've also watched many surgeries (I too am usually up late watching tv), eye surgeries, liposuction, breast reduction, siamese twin separation - I only draw the line at brain stuff. Brain stuff freaks me out.

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  • legendslegends Posts: 3,073Registered Users
    I don't think anyone loves hearing/reading about that kinda stuff more than I.

    But I'm somewhat conflicted over whether I should find entertainment in the suffering of others.

    It's not like I am a physician who is studying how to treat these peope; it's basically just a morbid curiosity to me. And I'm not sure that's OK.
    I'd say most physicians started out with a "morbid" curiosity. They're just so curious that they decide to study it for a living.
    Eres o te haces?
  • wavyblondewavyblonde Posts: 1,637Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Totally fascinated. I will admit that I also am transfixed by the trainwreckiness/unfortunateness of it all, so I can't claim it's just pure science that motivates me. I also like the BBCA docs on people who fall in love with inanimate objects and the like.
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  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I find them horrifying! It looks like I am the only one. I see how it could be interesting in the name of science but these shows sometimes make me angry (and frightened!) that the doctors overlooked things early in the diagnosis.

    The tumor episode would not interest me but I am sometimes interested in rare disorders that are finally diagnosed. I feel sorry for people who have something so rare that only like ten people in the world have been diagnosed so there's no funding for research. :(
    Springcurl wrote: »
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.
    NF is a difficult disease. There are 2 distinct families of NF, type 1 and type 2. I'm more fluent in type 2 because I have that particular disease. NF2 causes lesions on the CNS and PNS - many tumors can be excised easily if caught early, but as they grow and embed themselves around nerves and into other organs, removal can cause more neurological damage than leaving the tumor where it is. Until the last decade or so, there wasnt much in the way of medical intervention for NF. These lesions are slow growing, so theyre often not caught until they are rather substantial in size. I'm not sure if the man had type 1 or 2, but I'm assuming since the tumor was so incredibly large, that it had been growing for many, many years. When the doctors first saw the tumor, it may have been so intertwined on nerves and other organs, they possibly couldnt remove it.
    Now that doctors and neurologists are more aware of NF (Nf is very rare and most doctors wont go near it), there are more areas of study and specialists who know how to manage the disease. A specialty team of doctors, routine full body MRIs, audiograms, etc. is an absolute must when treating this disease to ensure that cases like this are avoided.

    Have you had any big tumors removed?

  • claudine19claudine19 Posts: 4,486Registered Users
    Springcurl wrote: »
    Who Me? wrote: »

    I think there's a difference between pure "entertainment" and satisfying curiosity and learning about the world. If we didn't try to learn about stuff by observing things, we'd just make up our own baseless stories to explain the natural world...and that's getting into a whole nother topic.

    Just because you're not studying the oddities as a physician doesn't mean you're not learning all kinds of things about the human body and the world when watching these kinds of shows.

    Has anyone else been to the Mutter Museum in Philadelphia? It's amazing.

    Whew, OK, I feel better now! LOL

    LOL. It's like, YAY! I'm not a jerk! For me it's also about learning. I went to court reporting school because it was the fastest track to get me off welfare, but I really wanted to be a nurse. About 6 years ago I took all the prerequisites for nursing school and applied and got accepted. But that was the year the economy went south and I couldn't get student loans... they were just flat out refusing. And my credit was okay! So I watch all these medical shows and read all these medical books just for the heck of it.

    I'd like to have been a dermatologist or a microbiologist, but I know I don't have the drive for med school, let alone the pre-med courses I'd need, not to mention the loan situation. And I honestly doubt I could function on the sleep schedule doctors are forced to keep during residency.

    But my interest remains intact; watching programs like this is vicarious training, for me.
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  • PoPo Posts: 2,607Registered Users
    I can't watch medical malady shows. Weak stomach. I feel bad saying this, but I think it's gross... :( Now if I had a friend or relative with a disfiguring condition, I would be desensitized, of course.
    3c/4a
  • Lucky CharmLucky Charm Posts: 1,250Registered Users
    Springcurl wrote: »
    He has neurofibromatosis and doctors wouldn't touch it and now it's bigger.
    NF is a difficult disease. There are 2 distinct families of NF, type 1 and type 2. I'm more fluent in type 2 because I have that particular disease. NF2 causes lesions on the CNS and PNS - many tumors can be excised easily if caught early, but as they grow and embed themselves around nerves and into other organs, removal can cause more neurological damage than leaving the tumor where it is. Until the last decade or so, there wasnt much in the way of medical intervention for NF. These lesions are slow growing, so theyre often not caught until they are rather substantial in size. I'm not sure if the man had type 1 or 2, but I'm assuming since the tumor was so incredibly large, that it had been growing for many, many years. When the doctors first saw the tumor, it may have been so intertwined on nerves and other organs, they possibly couldnt remove it.
    Now that doctors and neurologists are more aware of NF (Nf is very rare and most doctors wont go near it), there are more areas of study and specialists who know how to manage the disease. A specialty team of doctors, routine full body MRIs, audiograms, etc. is an absolute must when treating this disease to ensure that cases like this are avoided.

    Have you had any big tumors removed?
    Largest I had removed was 11 years ago when I was first diagnosed. It was a golf-ball sized tumor on my upper T-spine. I couldnt see it or feel it, but it showed on my first MRI scan. Less than a month later I was in surgery. They said that it has been growing so slowly that blood vessels and such had grown around it, and it wasnt causing an issue. However if I got in a car accident for example, it could have caused major complications. I see my neurologist all the time, I'm going tomorrow actually.
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  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,983Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    We're rooting for you LuckyCharm. :love7:Hope all is well tomorrow.

    I can't watch anything medical. I can't even watch movies where there's fake blood let alone anything real. I clench up if someone is given an injection. Tongue depressors are about my limit.
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  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    NF is a difficult disease. There are 2 distinct families of NF, type 1 and type 2. I'm more fluent in type 2 because I have that particular disease. NF2 causes lesions on the CNS and PNS - many tumors can be excised easily if caught early, but as they grow and embed themselves around nerves and into other organs, removal can cause more neurological damage than leaving the tumor where it is. Until the last decade or so, there wasnt much in the way of medical intervention for NF. These lesions are slow growing, so theyre often not caught until they are rather substantial in size. I'm not sure if the man had type 1 or 2, but I'm assuming since the tumor was so incredibly large, that it had been growing for many, many years. When the doctors first saw the tumor, it may have been so intertwined on nerves and other organs, they possibly couldnt remove it.
    Now that doctors and neurologists are more aware of NF (Nf is very rare and most doctors wont go near it), there are more areas of study and specialists who know how to manage the disease. A specialty team of doctors, routine full body MRIs, audiograms, etc. is an absolute must when treating this disease to ensure that cases like this are avoided.

    Have you had any big tumors removed?
    Largest I had removed was 11 years ago when I was first diagnosed. It was a golf-ball sized tumor on my upper T-spine. I couldnt see it or feel it, but it showed on my first MRI scan. Less than a month later I was in surgery. They said that it has been growing so slowly that blood vessels and such had grown around it, and it wasnt causing an issue. However if I got in a car accident for example, it could have caused major complications. I see my neurologist all the time, I'm going tomorrow actually.


    I'm hoping it goes well, too...no more surgery! :wav:

  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    NF is a difficult disease. There are 2 distinct families of NF, type 1 and type 2. I'm more fluent in type 2 because I have that particular disease. NF2 causes lesions on the CNS and PNS - many tumors can be excised easily if caught early, but as they grow and embed themselves around nerves and into other organs, removal can cause more neurological damage than leaving the tumor where it is. Until the last decade or so, there wasnt much in the way of medical intervention for NF. These lesions are slow growing, so theyre often not caught until they are rather substantial in size. I'm not sure if the man had type 1 or 2, but I'm assuming since the tumor was so incredibly large, that it had been growing for many, many years. When the doctors first saw the tumor, it may have been so intertwined on nerves and other organs, they possibly couldnt remove it.
    Now that doctors and neurologists are more aware of NF (Nf is very rare and most doctors wont go near it), there are more areas of study and specialists who know how to manage the disease. A specialty team of doctors, routine full body MRIs, audiograms, etc. is an absolute must when treating this disease to ensure that cases like this are avoided.
    <snip>
    Largest I had removed was 11 years ago when I was first diagnosed. It was a golf-ball sized tumor on my upper T-spine. I couldnt see it or feel it, but it showed on my first MRI scan. Less than a month later I was in surgery. They said that it has been growing so slowly that blood vessels and such had grown around it, and it wasnt causing an issue. However if I got in a car accident for example, it could have caused major complications. I see my neurologist all the time, I'm going tomorrow actually.

    Wow. Thanks for that info. I'll pay special attention tonight and see what they say about this poor guy. And good luck at the doc's!
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • Lucky CharmLucky Charm Posts: 1,250Registered Users
    Thanks ladies! Everything went fine! My Dr. said hes perfectly happy with how I'm doing, no concerns at all for the time being. I appreciate your kind words.
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    - treatments: CJ Curl Rehab, CJ Repair Me!
    - plopping, diffusing, and clipping the roots

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