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Horrible new folk remedy. Warning: it's pretty disturbing.

EilonwyEilonwy Posts: 12,389Registered Users
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  • The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,738Registered Users
    Head palm!
    montage-3.gif No MAS.

    I am the new Black.

    "Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.
  • midgimidgi Posts: 2,409Registered Users
    That's extremely disturbing, but it is interesting to me what kinds of folk remedies gain popularity in various parts of the world. Like, what kind of social/cultural knowledge/beliefs/values would make the ground-up baby flesh pills an acceptable course of treatment.
    I just want to do what I want to do when I want to do it.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    The ignorance and stupidity of human beings never fails to astound me.
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • CGNYCCGNYC Posts: 4,937Registered Users
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.

    I have been thinking about this a lot lately with yet another round of recalled pet treats from China. It's only really just clicked for me that the standard isn't is this safe or not but can we get away with this or not. I am FULLY aware that our own food industry (for starters) is much the same but it seems like in some of these foreign markets, there's NO ONE looking out for the consumer. Or worker.
  • claudine19claudine19 Posts: 4,486Registered Users
    It's when we do something good that I'm astounded.^
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Dogs and nature abhor a vacuum.
    http://geaugadoggy.wordpress.com
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users
    CGNYC wrote: »
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.

    I have been thinking about this a lot lately with yet another round of recalled pet treats from China. It's only really just clicked for me that the standard isn't is this safe or not but can we get away with this or not. I am FULLY aware that our own food industry (for starters) is much the same but it seems like in some of these foreign markets, there's NO ONE looking out for the consumer. Or worker.



    There is an old adage:

    Democracy is the worst kind of government there is...except for every other kind of government.

    That could apply here:

    The USA has the worst consumer food and drug protection agency there is...except for every other country's protection agencies.

    For all its faults, the FDA really does do a pretty good job of keeping our food and drugs relatively safe.

    The Conservative wing of the Republican Party wants to competely do away with our FDA (and they want to get rid of the EPA too!)

    Keep voting those Republican Tea Party candidates into office folks...and we can be just like China and have ground up human body parts in our drugs and melamine in our baby formula.
  • CGNYCCGNYC Posts: 4,937Registered Users
    claudine19 wrote: »
    It's when we do something good that I'm astounded.^

    Ha, yes.
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.

    What does dollar store stuff from China have to do with a folk medicine remedy in South Korea (A remedy I'm just guessing is very obscure.)?

    I ironically have an interview tomorrow at a dollar store, and the manager is Korean. I'm sure she'd like to hear about all of these "Asian probs."

    Most of the food grown in the U.S. is genetically modified while most of Europe does not allow genetic engineering, and the FDA has not proven the food to be safe. I don't see how getting food from China is riskier than that. Too late, we already are.
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    Also, why aren't those of you who are so freaked out by food from Asia out farming? I come from a long line of farmers, but no one in this generation of the family is farming. It is much more expensive to farm and manufacture here and even if it wasn't, the blue collar workforce is 1/4 of what it was in the 1950's. If we brought back the jobs, who would do them? Most of my generation is incredibly lazy and above that kind of work, but strangely enough not above sitting around and living off mom. That's what it comes down to - the U.S. dropping the ball and passing the blame.
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,258Registered Users
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.

    What does dollar store stuff from China have to do with a folk medicine remedy in South Korea (A remedy I'm just guessing is very obscure.)?

    I ironically have an interview tomorrow at a dollar store, and the manager is Korean. I'm sure she'd like to hear about all of these "Asian probs."

    Most of the food grown in the U.S. is genetically modified while most of Europe does not allow genetic engineering, and the FDA has not proven the food to be safe. I don't see how getting food from China is riskier than that. Too late, we already are.



    I did not use the term "Asian probs", so I don't know where you got that from. I said China specifically.

    I think it's been shown time and time again that life seems to be very cheap in China. From tainted dog food to baby formula, no one seems to be watching out for what is being manufactured for consumption in China. I choose not to purchase China-made food and other products, so I don't shop in dollar stores, which seems to be a prime outlet for such products. It's really that simple. You can tell your potential boss whatever you like, but I wouldn't mention the Crazy-Internet-Lady-Who-Won't-Shop-in-Dollar-Stores if I were you. ;)
  • midgimidgi Posts: 2,409Registered Users
    I think it's important to remember that China is a communist country. The CPC is corrupt, oppressive and disorganized. The quality of the products that are produced in China is most likely a reflection of the political, economic, and social environment--not necessarily a reflection of the Chinese people, their standards or their values. The Chinese aren't a homogenous group, much like "American" applies to a variety of ethnic/religious/cultural/etc. groups in the US.

    BTW, although the article is about a folk remedy in South Korea, it does say that the pills were manufactured in China.

    Even so, as Norah stated, it's probably an obscure practice, or at least limited to a small group of people. The article doesn't state how widespread or popular the pills are.

    Finally, are you currently out plowing a field Norah? Your advice is overly-simplistic.
    I just want to do what I want to do when I want to do it.
  • legendslegends Posts: 3,073Registered Users
    Edited because I read the article AFTER posting.
    Eres o te haces?
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    midgi wrote: »
    I think it's important to remember that China is a communist country. The CPC is corrupt, oppressive and disorganized. The quality of the products that are produced in China is most likely a reflection of the political, economic, and social environment--not necessarily a reflection of the Chinese people, their standards or their values. The Chinese aren't a homogenous group, much like "American" applies to a variety of ethnic/religious/cultural/etc. groups in the US.

    BTW, although the article is about a folk remedy in South Korea, it does say that the pills were manufactured in China.

    Even so, as Norah stated, it's probably an obscure practice, or at least limited to a small group of people. The article doesn't state how widespread or popular the pills are.

    Finally, are you currently out plowing a field Norah? Your advice is overly-simplistic.

    No, and I'm not one of the ones complaining about Chinese food standards. I'm just happy to have food any more that I can afford. We can't have it both ways. If we want food made here, we have to make it here or stop complaining and putting blame on other nations. It's that simple. IDK I ate dollar store cookies a few weeks ago (made in India not China), and I'm still alive.

    We are a global society. We can't just boycott a country's goods because we don't agree with its policies. Blame our leaders for their policies that discourage American agriculture like spiking property taxes.
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    Remember this next time you shop in Dollar stores in America...most/all of that stuff is made in China, where the stardards are much lower.

    What does dollar store stuff from China have to do with a folk medicine remedy in South Korea (A remedy I'm just guessing is very obscure.)?

    I ironically have an interview tomorrow at a dollar store, and the manager is Korean. I'm sure she'd like to hear about all of these "Asian probs."

    Most of the food grown in the U.S. is genetically modified while most of Europe does not allow genetic engineering, and the FDA has not proven the food to be safe. I don't see how getting food from China is riskier than that. Too late, we already are.



    I did not use the term "Asian probs", so I don't know where you got that from. I said China specifically.

    I think it's been shown time and time again that life seems to be very cheap in China. From tainted dog food to baby formula, no one seems to be watching out for what is being manufactured for consumption in China. I choose not to purchase China-made food and other products, so I don't shop in dollar stores, which seems to be a prime outlet for such products. It's really that simple. You can tell your potential boss whatever you like, but I wouldn't mention the Crazy-Internet-Lady-Who-Won't-Shop-in-Dollar-Stores if I were you. ;)

    You seemed to be talking about South Korea and China as if they were one country.

    Processed foods often contain ingredients from China and other countries, and don't require that info to be put on the label. We have plenty of Purina plants in the states (well less and less it seems - one near me burned down a few years ago and wasn't saved) but not all of its ingredients come from the U.S. Even upscale brands were in China wheat gluten recall that killed several pets.

    I understand your POV, but I don't see how we can avoid when probably more and more foodstuffs will come from overseas. In the nuclear scare in Japan it was reported that 2% of our milk comes from Japan. It seems pretty surreal to me that even 2% would be but it's a different world than when I grew up with my school across from a dairy farm.
  • spiderlashes5000spiderlashes5000 Posts: 17,495Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    NorahBugg wrote: »

    What does dollar store stuff from China have to do with a folk medicine remedy in South Korea (A remedy I'm just guessing is very obscure.)?

    I ironically have an interview tomorrow at a dollar store, and the manager is Korean. I'm sure she'd like to hear about all of these "Asian probs."

    Most of the food grown in the U.S. is genetically modified while most of Europe does not allow genetic engineering, and the FDA has not proven the food to be safe. I don't see how getting food from China is riskier than that. Too late, we already are.



    I did not use the term "Asian probs", so I don't know where you got that from. I said China specifically.

    I think it's been shown time and time again that life seems to be very cheap in China. From tainted dog food to baby formula, no one seems to be watching out for what is being manufactured for consumption in China. I choose not to purchase China-made food and other products, so I don't shop in dollar stores, which seems to be a prime outlet for such products. It's really that simple. You can tell your potential boss whatever you like, but I wouldn't mention the Crazy-Internet-Lady-Who-Won't-Shop-in-Dollar-Stores if I were you. ;)

    You seemed to be talking about South Korea and China as if they were one country.

    Processed foods often contain ingredients from China and other countries, and don't require that info to be put on the label. We have plenty of Purina plants in the states (well less and less it seems - one near me burned down a few years ago and wasn't saved) but not all of its ingredients come from the U.S. Even upscale brands were in China wheat gluten recall that killed several pets.

    I understand your POV, but I don't see how we can avoid when probably more and more foodstuffs will come from overseas. In the nuclear scare in Japan it was reported that 2% of our milk comes from Japan. It seems pretty surreal to me that even 2% would be but it's a different world than when I grew up with my school across from a dairy farm.


    The pills were made in China.

  • CGNYCCGNYC Posts: 4,937Registered Users
    I can't speak for anyone else but the Dollar Store reference was a reminder, to me, that all cheap goods still come at a price, even if it isn't at the cash register. Those of us who can be responsible consumers should be, even if that just means consuming less. It's a damn shame that being poor means buying downright unsafe goods and food and what has happens with farming and food in this country is a crime.

    This is relevant because there's a reason things from certain other countries are so much cheaper and it's not because they have magical cheap ingredients or workers who are happy to work in sweat shops.
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    midgi wrote: »
    I think it's important to remember that China is a communist country. The CPC is corrupt, oppressive and disorganized. The quality of the products that are produced in China is most likely a reflection of the political, economic, and social environment--not necessarily a reflection of the Chinese people, their standards or their values. The Chinese aren't a homogenous group, much like "American" applies to a variety of ethnic/religious/cultural/etc. groups in the US.

    BTW, although the article is about a folk remedy in South Korea, it does say that the pills were manufactured in China.

    Even so, as Norah stated, it's probably an obscure practice, or at least limited to a small group of people. The article doesn't state how widespread or popular the pills are.

    Finally, are you currently out plowing a field Norah? Your advice is overly-simplistic.

    No, and I'm not one of the ones complaining about Chinese food standards. I'm just happy to have food any more that I can afford. We can't have it both ways. If we want food made here, we have to make it here or stop complaining and putting blame on other nations. It's that simple. IDK I ate dollar store cookies a few weeks ago (made in India not China), and I'm still alive.

    We are a global society. We can't just boycott a country's goods because we don't agree with its policies. Blame our leaders for their policies that discourage American agriculture like spiking property taxes.

    Actually, yes we can. Buying power is one of the most powerful ways people can make their voices heard.
  • midgimidgi Posts: 2,409Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    midgi wrote: »
    I think it's important to remember that China is a communist country. The CPC is corrupt, oppressive and disorganized. The quality of the products that are produced in China is most likely a reflection of the political, economic, and social environment--not necessarily a reflection of the Chinese people, their standards or their values. The Chinese aren't a homogenous group, much like "American" applies to a variety of ethnic/religious/cultural/etc. groups in the US.

    BTW, although the article is about a folk remedy in South Korea, it does say that the pills were manufactured in China.

    Even so, as Norah stated, it's probably an obscure practice, or at least limited to a small group of people. The article doesn't state how widespread or popular the pills are.

    Finally, are you currently out plowing a field Norah? Your advice is overly-simplistic.

    No, and I'm not one of the ones complaining about Chinese food standards. I'm just happy to have food any more that I can afford. We can't have it both ways. If we want food made here, we have to make it here or stop complaining and putting blame on other nations. It's that simple. IDK I ate dollar store cookies a few weeks ago (made in India not China), and I'm still alive.

    We are a global society. We can't just boycott a country's goods because we don't agree with its policies. Blame our leaders for their policies that discourage American agriculture like spiking property taxes.

    Actually, yes we can. Buying power is one of the most powerful ways people can make their voices heard.

    Right, and the US boycotts goods ALL the time. We have trade regulations, implement sanctions, and recall goods that are deemed unsafe by our own standards.
    I just want to do what I want to do when I want to do it.
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    midgi wrote: »
    I think it's important to remember that China is a communist country. The CPC is corrupt, oppressive and disorganized. The quality of the products that are produced in China is most likely a reflection of the political, economic, and social environment--not necessarily a reflection of the Chinese people, their standards or their values. The Chinese aren't a homogenous group, much like "American" applies to a variety of ethnic/religious/cultural/etc. groups in the US.

    BTW, although the article is about a folk remedy in South Korea, it does say that the pills were manufactured in China.

    Even so, as Norah stated, it's probably an obscure practice, or at least limited to a small group of people. The article doesn't state how widespread or popular the pills are.

    Finally, are you currently out plowing a field Norah? Your advice is overly-simplistic.

    No, and I'm not one of the ones complaining about Chinese food standards. I'm just happy to have food any more that I can afford. We can't have it both ways. If we want food made here, we have to make it here or stop complaining and putting blame on other nations. It's that simple. IDK I ate dollar store cookies a few weeks ago (made in India not China), and I'm still alive.

    We are a global society. We can't just boycott a country's goods because we don't agree with its policies. Blame our leaders for their policies that discourage American agriculture like spiking property taxes.

    Actually, yes we can. Buying power is one of the most powerful ways people can make their voices heard.

    We're not even boycotting Iranian oil when Iran's leaders are corrupt, borderline terrorists and hate our guts. Europe is and look how well it's doing for them. If we were to boycott, my thinking is that we'd start there. We're not an isolationist nation and I hate to see so much anti-China sentiment going around. Anti-Asian really. China's our ally for one and another thing, call me Jon Huntsman but we need China.
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    Also, as far as food safety, China doesn't have a great record but neither do we. Our plants have salamonella outbreaks on a regular basis. I hear about recalls all the time stemming from our local plants. Pet food originating from one an Ohio plant with an outbreak recently severely sickened two people. Plants everywhere are pressured to produce faster and cheaper with workers getting paid less. It's going to be a problem; it is a problem, and it's not a China-only or Asia-only issue.
  • CGNYCCGNYC Posts: 4,937Registered Users
    comment removed
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    comment removed due to rudeness
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,059 Administrator
    This thread is getting away from the topic. No personal attacks, veiled or outright.
  • M2LRM2LR Posts: 8,630Registered Users
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    Also, as far as food safety, China doesn't have a great record but neither do we. Our plants have salamonella outbreaks on a regular basis. I hear about recalls all the time stemming from our local plants. Pet food originating from one an Ohio plant with an outbreak recently severely sickened two people. Plants everywhere are pressured to produce faster and cheaper with workers getting paid less. It's going to be a problem; it is a problem, and it's not a China-only or Asia-only issue. Really obnoxious that people don't get this.

    Why were the people eating pet food?
    :rambo:
  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    M2LR wrote: »
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    Also, as far as food safety, China doesn't have a great record but neither do we. Our plants have salamonella outbreaks on a regular basis. I hear about recalls all the time stemming from our local plants. Pet food originating from one an Ohio plant with an outbreak recently severely sickened two people. Plants everywhere are pressured to produce faster and cheaper with workers getting paid less. It's going to be a problem; it is a problem, and it's not a China-only or Asia-only issue. Really obnoxious that people don't get this.

    Why were the people eating pet food?

    It made them sick from just handling it! They reminded everyone to make sure to wash your hands after coming into contact with pet food. I guess we have to nowadays though I use a scooper.
  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    CGNYC wrote: »
    Yes, it is sort of obnoxious when someone totally misses the point.

    What is your "point?" Sorry, couldn't get much past the thinly veiled xenophobia.

    you know, you're really new here and you might want to get to know people and read their posts before you make that absolutely outrageous claim of xenophobia.
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



  • NorahBuggNorahBugg Posts: 134Registered Users
    Springcurl wrote: »
    NorahBugg wrote: »
    CGNYC wrote: »
    Yes, it is sort of obnoxious when someone totally misses the point.

    What is your "point?" Sorry, couldn't get much past the thinly veiled xenophobia.

    you know, you're really new here and you might want to get to know people and read their posts before you make that absolutely outrageous claim of xenophobia. You're showing your asz.

    I've been here for like 2 months. This is a message board and why would I have to get to know anyone to say their comments are xenophobic? How is that a personal attack? I'm not getting personal; she was rude to me!

    It's not just one or two people, it's a widespread thing that is dissettling, and I don't put up with it! I won't respond more to this except to say your's is far more of a personal attack than anything I said! Also, what is your point of coming into this thread just to hound me? She can take care of herself if you think I'm picking on her so badly. Way to try to detract away from the issue.
  • SpringcurlSpringcurl Posts: 8,002Registered Users
    okay
    TWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gifTWINKLES.gif

    Obamacare is not a blueprint for socialism. You're thinking of the New Testament. ~~ John Fugelsang



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