CurlTalk

Diaspora, help me understand our healthcare problems

fraufrau Posts: 6,130Registered Users
diaspora, would you please answer a few questions for me?
are we really in a healthcare crisis or are we trying to avoid one?
in your opinion do you think universal healthcare is a solution to our current or future problems?
are you familiar with the new heath care plan that is being put in place? if so can you explain what it is or how it will work?
can you please explain if you believe the new system will help solve our healthcare crisis (if we truly have one)?

finally, can you try to explain all of the above without a political party bias?

tia!

the last thread was a mishmash of opinions, rants and facts. i would like diaspora to answer since this is her field.
«1

Comments

  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    We have a major public health issue fueled by inequitable investments.

    Universal healthcare is the moral thing to do.

    Anything less is not worth my energy.

    I'm pretty black/white on this issue and my perspective is largely driven by my morals and my view of the responsibility of a properly functioning government.
    hello.world.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    frau wrote: »
    diaspora, would you please answer a few questions for me?
    are we really in a healthcare crisis or are we trying to avoid one?
    in your opinion do you think universal healthcare is a solution to our current or future problems?
    are you familiar with the new heath care plan that is being put in place? if so can you explain what it is or how it will work?
    can you please explain if you believe the new system will help solve our healthcare crisis (if we truly have one)?

    finally, can you try to explain all of the above without a political party bias?

    tia!

    the last thread was a mishmash of opinions, rants and facts. i would like diaspora to answer since this is her field.

    I love your questions! Personally I can't stand the Republican or Democratic parties, but that's another thread. And they both suck on this issue, with the exception of Kucinich (who lost his seat) and Sanders, Democrats.

    Short answers: Are we really in a healthcare crisis? Yes. Is single-payer national healthcare a necessary part of fixing it? Yes. Will the new healthcare legislation fix it? No.

    Very long answers:

    Yes, the US is definitely in a healthcare crisis. 84,000 people die each year due to lack of healthcare. 52 million have no health insurance and about 80 million are underinsured. Medical bills are the #1 cause of bankruptcy, and most people with medical bankruptcies actually had insurance. Our healthcare system ranks only 37th by the World Health Organization. Our health status reflects this. We rank 34th on infant mortality, meaning 33 countries have less infant deaths, including Cuba, Croatia, Canada, Singapore, Japan, and most of Europe.

    Yes, a single-payer, non-profit, national healthcare system which guarantees coverage to all from birth to death, as every other post-industrial nation has (and many less wealthy countries) is necessary to fix the healthcare crisis. Healthcare cannot be based on ability to pay or people will keep dying and suffering needlessly. Healthcare should also not be granted to us through a gatekeeper, the health insurance corporations. It is in their financial benefit to deny people care. That is how they make money, by taking premiums and denying claims. People have died because they deny care. I've met families of some of these people. They provide no actual service. They create expensive, administrative nightmares. Single-payer legislation would eliminate the for-profit insurance industry and care would be privately delivered as it is now, and publicly funded. The government (via our tax contributions) would be the "single payer." Even if you do not look at this issue morally, single-payer is actually much less expensive than the system we have now and the new bill that passed, because insurance companies spend 30% of our money on overhead, and Medicare, the system single-payer would be based on, has a 3% overhead because it doesn't have to advertise, market, and pay CEOs. Health outcomes are actually better under Medicare than private insurance too.

    26 states have legislation for state single-payer, and there is national legislation too, HR 676. California's legislature passed single-payer twice but Schwarzeneger vetoed it. Vermont passed the closest thing we've seen to single-payer last year, but it cannot go into effect yet due to rules in the legislation Pres. Obama passed. Most people and most doctors support single-payer according to polls, but you will rarely hear about this because there is a documented media blackout on single-payer. FAIR Study: Media Blackout on Single-Payer Healthcare

    Unfortunately the new healthcare law, the ACA, will not fix the healthcare crisis. Even people who support Obama and this bill admit that it is lacking, but they think it is a "step in the right direction." I wouldn't even call it that. The biggest problem in the system is the health insurance industry (and they are the biggest opponent of universal healthcare), and the ACA increases the power of this industry. The bill was actually co-authored by a health insurance executive from Wellpoint, so that tells you something. Most people who do not receive health insurance through work will be mandated by law to purchase insurance through new "exchanges" or they will be fined through their taxes. The choices will be plans that you pay a premium for and will cover 60%, 70%, or 80% of your costs, so you get better coverage depending on what you can afford. So it's not at all equitable. Plus, being responsible for 80% of your care, plus a premium, is unaffordable for many of us. So many people will be purchasing insurance they will not be able to afford to use. The new norm will be unaffordable under-insurance. We will still be punished for being sick. We will still be vulnerable to bankruptcies or losing our homes if we get sick. We will still be at the mercy of profit-hungry insurance corporations.

    The other big thing in the ACA is the expansion of Medicaid. On paper, I think this is a good idea, though Medicaid is not nearly as good a program as Medicare. It is a very underfunded program. Every state is cutting it and are turning people away. It is very, very difficult to find specialists who accept Medicaid because it reimburses doctors at a lower rate than Medicare and private insurance. So, we're all pretty nervous about how the expansion of Medicaid will work, and I'm not even holding my breath that it will happen. Many parts of the bill that are decent have been stripped from it, and this will probably continue.

    The constitutionality of the individual mandate in the ACA (that people must purchase insurance) has been challenged and the Supreme Court is announcing its decision in June. Though most of the people who are challenging it are doing so from the right for political reasons, many of us hope it goes down, as forcing people to purchase private health insurance is not going to help (but will hurt). We're not in a crisis because not enough people are purchasing health insurance, we're in a crisis because health care has been put out of reach and our government does not consider it a basic human right.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    It didn't even occur to me that there was a poster named diaspora.

    :viking:
    hello.world.
  • fraufrau Posts: 6,130Registered Users
    thank you so much diaspora!! i really appreciate the time you took to write such a detailed response. i hope everyone who is under-informed, like myself, reads your post.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    webjockey wrote: »
    It didn't even occur to me that there was a poster named diaspora.

    :viking:

    Lol, that's ok!
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    frau wrote: »
    thank you so much diaspora!! i really appreciate the time you took to write such a detailed response. i hope everyone who is under-informed, like myself, reads your post.

    You're welcome, I'm glad to talk about the subject and glad you are interested! Believe it or not, when I posted about national healthcare years back when I was on this site, nearly every curly who posted said it was a crazy or unrealistic idea.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • juanabjuanab Posts: 4,037Registered Users
    I am living the nightmare of having a chronic disease, but no health insurance. I have had health insurance my whole life until now. I am now disabled and was on COBRA which has now run out. I don't qualify for medicaid, I get too much from LTD payments. I have not been approved for SSDI, waiting on an administrative hearing. God willing I will be approved. Even after approval, I will probably have to wait two years before I can get it. I am disqualified from individual plans, because of my disease. There is a government program that requires that I be without health insurance for 6 months to qualify.

    In the meantime I have to ration my medication, go without some treatments that will slow the progression of the disease. IMHO, Universal care would allow me to continue receiving the medical care I need. Instead I risk, more irreversible damage to my body.

    texture - medium/fine, porosity - low/normal, elasticity - normal
    co-wash - NaturelleGrow Coconut Water or Marshmallow Root, Slippery Elm Bark & Blue Malva Cleansing Conditioners
    LI - KCKT mixed w/ SM C & H Curl & Style Milk
    DC - NG Mango & Coconut H2O or Chamomile/Brdck Root
    Gel - SM souffle (winter), KCCC (summer) or CR Naturals Aloe Whipped Butter Gel (year round)
    Sealers - Virgin Coconut Oil, Avocado butter, Aloe butter
    Ayurvedic treatments - Jamila Henna, Sukesh, Aloe Vera Powder, Hibiscus Powder
    .


    event.png
  • curlylauracurlylaura Posts: 8,352Registered Users
    juanab wrote: »
    I am living the nightmare of having a chronic disease, but no health insurance. I have had health insurance my whole life until now. I am now disabled and was on COBRA which has now run out. I don't qualify for medicaid, I get too much from LTD payments. I have not been approved for SSDI, waiting on an administrative hearing. God willing I will be approved. Even after approval, I will probably have to wait two years before I can get it. I am disqualified from individual plans, because of my disease. There is a government program that requires that I be without health insurance for 6 months to qualify.

    In the meantime I have to ration my medication, go without some treatments that will slow the progression of the disease. IMHO, Universal care would allow me to continue receiving the medical care I need. Instead I risk, more irreversible damage to my body.

    I cannot believe a country would allow this to happen to people. I know the NHS can't/won't do some treatments due cost ( it usually comes down to do they treat the few or the many), but people will still be treated, they will not be left to ration medication.

    I can't even express how I feel about your situation juanab. It's just wrong.
    Fat does not make you fat. It's actually pretty important.
  • journotravelerjournotraveler Posts: 2,816Registered Users
    curlylaura wrote: »
    juanab wrote: »
    I am living the nightmare of having a chronic disease, but no health insurance. I have had health insurance my whole life until now. I am now disabled and was on COBRA which has now run out. I don't qualify for medicaid, I get too much from LTD payments. I have not been approved for SSDI, waiting on an administrative hearing. God willing I will be approved. Even after approval, I will probably have to wait two years before I can get it. I am disqualified from individual plans, because of my disease. There is a government program that requires that I be without health insurance for 6 months to qualify.

    In the meantime I have to ration my medication, go without some treatments that will slow the progression of the disease. IMHO, Universal care would allow me to continue receiving the medical care I need. Instead I risk, more irreversible damage to my body.

    I cannot believe a country would allow this to happen to people. I know the NHS can't/won't do some treatments due cost ( it usually comes down to do they treat the few or the many), but people will still be treated, they will not be left to ration medication.

    I can't even express how I feel about your situation juanab. It's just wrong.

    This. Hearing about situations like this just enrages me.

    juanab, I hope you are able to find a satisfactory solution to this soon.
    3B corkscrews with scatterings of 3A & 3C.
  • rouquinnerouquinne Posts: 13,498Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    (((juana)))

    i wish you could move to Canada!
    My blog:

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Flabellatestarossa.blogspot.ca%2F" class="Popup

    Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
  • juanabjuanab Posts: 4,037Registered Users
    rouquinne wrote: »
    (((juana)))

    i wish you could move to Canada!

    So do I. U love Toronto, it is just too cold in the winter!

    texture - medium/fine, porosity - low/normal, elasticity - normal
    co-wash - NaturelleGrow Coconut Water or Marshmallow Root, Slippery Elm Bark & Blue Malva Cleansing Conditioners
    LI - KCKT mixed w/ SM C & H Curl & Style Milk
    DC - NG Mango & Coconut H2O or Chamomile/Brdck Root
    Gel - SM souffle (winter), KCCC (summer) or CR Naturals Aloe Whipped Butter Gel (year round)
    Sealers - Virgin Coconut Oil, Avocado butter, Aloe butter
    Ayurvedic treatments - Jamila Henna, Sukesh, Aloe Vera Powder, Hibiscus Powder
    .


    event.png
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    juanab wrote: »
    I am living the nightmare of having a chronic disease, but no health insurance. I have had health insurance my whole life until now. I am now disabled and was on COBRA which has now run out. I don't qualify for medicaid, I get too much from LTD payments. I have not been approved for SSDI, waiting on an administrative hearing. God willing I will be approved. Even after approval, I will probably have to wait two years before I can get it. I am disqualified from individual plans, because of my disease. There is a government program that requires that I be without health insurance for 6 months to qualify.

    In the meantime I have to ration my medication, go without some treatments that will slow the progression of the disease. IMHO, Universal care would allow me to continue receiving the medical care I need. Instead I risk, more irreversible damage to my body.

    {{{{Juanab}}}} We live in a really sick system, it is those who need care the most who have the most trouble getting it. There are few options for people with chronic illness who can't work consistently or at all (unless you're a billionaire). I have a chronic illness too and have had a horrible time with the healthcare system, which is what caused me to research what solutions existed and got me involved in the movement for single-payer some years ago.

    Things got so bad after a bout of being uninsured that I couldn't work anymore (though I've tried again since) and like you, had to apply for SSDI as I wasn't eligible for health insurance. I remember finding one plan that would accept me, for $850/month, and this was in '05. I was approved for SSDI, but you are right, there is a 2 year waiting period after you are approved before you receive Medicare! I was "lucky" that because I had no assets or income, I qualified for Medicaid. But most people are not poor enough to get it. It's disgusting that the state is deeming you disabled but doesn't even help you for 2 years. Are you working with a lawyer for your hearing? Many people end up having to do so to get approved.

    I've been uninsured, underinsured, private insurance, COBRA, Medicaid alone and Medicare/Medicaid. By far I've had the best unobstructed access to care with Medicare (and Medicaid to cover my co-pays), a single-payer program with no insurance company in the way. Good luck Juanab and keep me posted.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • juanabjuanab Posts: 4,037Registered Users
    diaspora wrote: »
    juanab wrote: »
    I am living the nightmare of having a chronic disease, but no health insurance. I have had health insurance my whole life until now. I am now disabled and was on COBRA which has now run out. I don't qualify for medicaid, I get too much from LTD payments. I have not been approved for SSDI, waiting on an administrative hearing. God willing I will be approved. Even after approval, I will probably have to wait two years before I can get it. I am disqualified from individual plans, because of my disease. There is a government program that requires that I be without health insurance for 6 months to qualify.

    In the meantime I have to ration my medication, go without some treatments that will slow the progression of the disease. IMHO, Universal care would allow me to continue receiving the medical care I need. Instead I risk, more irreversible damage to my body.

    {{{{Juanab}}}} We live in a really sick system, it is those who need care the most who have the most trouble getting it. There are few options for people with chronic illness who can't work consistently or at all (unless you're a billionaire). I have a chronic illness too and have had a horrible time with the healthcare system, which is what caused me to research what solutions existed and got me involved in the movement for single-payer some years ago.

    Things got so bad after a bout of being uninsured that I couldn't work anymore (though I've tried again since) and like you, had to apply for SSDI as I wasn't eligible for health insurance. I remember finding one plan that would accept me, for $850/month, and this was in '05. I was approved for SSDI, but you are right, there is a 2 year waiting period after you are approved before you receive Medicare! I was "lucky" that because I had no assets or income, I qualified for Medicaid. But most people are not poor enough to get it. It's disgusting that the state is deeming you disabled but doesn't even help you for 2 years. Are you working with a lawyer for your hearing? Many people end up having to do so to get approved.

    I've been uninsured, underinsured, private insurance, COBRA, Medicaid alone and Medicare/Medicaid. By far I've had the best unobstructed access to care with Medicare (and Medicaid to cover my co-pays), a single-payer program with no insurance company in the way. Good luck Juanab and keep me posted.

    Diaspora, yes I have an attorney. My hearing should be by September. You can certainly relate to my situation. Thanks and I will keep you posted.

    texture - medium/fine, porosity - low/normal, elasticity - normal
    co-wash - NaturelleGrow Coconut Water or Marshmallow Root, Slippery Elm Bark & Blue Malva Cleansing Conditioners
    LI - KCKT mixed w/ SM C & H Curl & Style Milk
    DC - NG Mango & Coconut H2O or Chamomile/Brdck Root
    Gel - SM souffle (winter), KCCC (summer) or CR Naturals Aloe Whipped Butter Gel (year round)
    Sealers - Virgin Coconut Oil, Avocado butter, Aloe butter
    Ayurvedic treatments - Jamila Henna, Sukesh, Aloe Vera Powder, Hibiscus Powder
    .


    event.png
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
    JuanaB and Diaspora, I am so deeply, deeply saddened by your situations. Personally, I believe universal healthcare should be as much of a right as universal education. A parent can choose to homeschool, but in cases like yours, there is no option.

    Maybe I am mixing apples and oranges, but it just makes me so sad and angry to read your situations. What kind of country do we live in that permits this. For shame!!!
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    Thanks, Curlypearl, and I don't think comparing universal education with universal healthcare is apples and oranges, I think it's right on-point. I think education, healthcare, housing, and food should all be considered basic human rights, as we need these basic things in order to thrive but may not be able to get them as individuals based on no fault of our own. And we will get national healthcare in the US eventually, it's a tough fight, but there are lots of us out there fighting for it.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • sleepymekosleepymeko Posts: 1,002Registered Users
    Living in Europe really changed my perspective on a bunch of things in this country. Things such as how expensive higher education is and the lack of universal healthcare, which the public doesn't want for some strange reason.

    It's sad I was shocked I didn't have to pay a fee to get my eyes looked at when I lived over there. I just had to pay for the frames. It really bothered me how much this country likes to rob its citizens. I feel like I get charged up the ass for small things.

    I saw citizens in that country helping each other out--it was a strange kind of unity. I feel like here in the States, it's every man for himself and that shouldn't be OK. If we want to succeed as a country, everyone needs to succeed. Not just that 1% that can afford it.

    The city streets there looked cleaner too, everyone was educated, and I never saw a homeless person. Very sad country we live in.

    "A bandaid at the hospital? That will be $250."

    I'm thankful I was on insurance when my gallbladder flared up.
    Check out my personal blog :afro:



    s-event.png
  • juanabjuanab Posts: 4,037Registered Users
    curlypearl wrote: »
    JuanaB and Diaspora, I am so deeply, deeply saddened by your situations. Personally, I believe universal healthcare should be as much of a right as universal education. A parent can choose to homeschool, but in cases like yours, there is no option.

    Maybe I am mixing apples and oranges, but it just makes me so sad and angry to read your situations. What kind of country do we live in that permits this. For shame!!!

    I agree with both. Thanks CP. it saddens me that anyone has to go through any of this.

    texture - medium/fine, porosity - low/normal, elasticity - normal
    co-wash - NaturelleGrow Coconut Water or Marshmallow Root, Slippery Elm Bark & Blue Malva Cleansing Conditioners
    LI - KCKT mixed w/ SM C & H Curl & Style Milk
    DC - NG Mango & Coconut H2O or Chamomile/Brdck Root
    Gel - SM souffle (winter), KCCC (summer) or CR Naturals Aloe Whipped Butter Gel (year round)
    Sealers - Virgin Coconut Oil, Avocado butter, Aloe butter
    Ayurvedic treatments - Jamila Henna, Sukesh, Aloe Vera Powder, Hibiscus Powder
    .


    event.png
  • crimsonshedemoncrimsonshedemon Posts: 2,098Registered Users
    juanab wrote: »
    curlypearl wrote: »
    JuanaB and Diaspora, I am so deeply, deeply saddened by your situations. Personally, I believe universal healthcare should be as much of a right as universal education. A parent can choose to homeschool, but in cases like yours, there is no option.

    Maybe I am mixing apples and oranges, but it just makes me so sad and angry to read your situations. What kind of country do we live in that permits this. For shame!!!

    I agree with both. Thanks CP. it saddens me that anyone has to go through any of this.

    I have chronic health issues and insurance. Still have a large amount of medical bills. My premiums are outrageous and my husband works for the state of CA.
    I've talked to many many people in Canada, UK and Australia and they don't sing the praises of national health care. In fact, the ones that have lived here in the states and had private health care, prefer it to national health care of Canada.
    Seems it's great for the acute problems but when there's any type of long term, difficult health issue, it's really limited. Appointment times to see a specialist take months to a year. They say they don't have options- with doctors, with prescriptions, with testing, etc.
    Don't get me wrong, I realize that few options are better than no healthcare... but I also know the huge difference in health care from when I had a HMO to my current PPO.
    I'm blessed in that my husband has a good job that offers benefits. Until last year, we were paying over 600$ just for our portion of the premium. The system is a disaster but national health care causes concern too.
  • rouquinnerouquinne Posts: 13,498Registered Users Curl Dabbler
    ... the ones that have lived here in the states and had private health care, prefer it to national health care of Canada.
    Seems it's great for the acute problems but when there's any type of long term, difficult health issue, it's really limited. (...)Appointment times to see a specialist take months to a year. They say they don't have options- with doctors, with prescriptions, with testing, etc.

    i've NEVER waited "months to a year" for a specialist! NEVER! a couple of times, for nothing urgent, i have waited, but that's all.

    as for not having options, i am allowed to see ANY doctor ANYWHERE in the province i live in. when i moved to Ottawa, i still went to my endocrinologist in Toronto - 5 hours away - for the first 2 years.

    prescriptions aren't covered on our provincial plans, you need supplemental insurance for that, and i am fortunate to have that through my employer. but it can be bought, for a rate that Americans would find laughable (less than $200 per month for a single person). testing can be done at ANY accredited lab facility in the province! every pharmacist recommends generics where they are available.

    the best example i can give you took place when i first joined this site. one of my dearest friends who lived in Memphis, TN had died of cancer only a couple of weeks before i joined NC. despite a *good* insurance policy through her employer - the University of Tennessee - she was turned down for life-saving treatment and left us at the age of 50; and left a ton of expenses that forced her children to sell their family home. 2 years later, when my father had cancer, he had the EXACT same doctor as one of his hockey heroes from the NHL in Montreal (and Quebec was supposed to have a BAD public health system back then) and his hospice at the end of his life was quite luxurious.

    when Papa died, some of my American friends offered me money to pay his final expenses. i had to tell them that my sister and i got money back from the Quebec health system. Papa's room and board at the hospice came out of his provincial gov't pension and it was paid a month in advance. he died on the 9th of the month.

    there were no other expenses for him - not for drugs, nursing, doctors, tests... NOT A SINGLE ONE!

    i've had 5 surgeries in the past 20 years and walked out of the hospital without anyone showing me a bill.

    yeah, i pay more in taxes; but i've posted the figure elsewhere here and it's less on a yearly basis than many Americans pay per month!

    oh yeah... the system up here in Canada is SO bad.... NOT!
    My blog:

    /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Flabellatestarossa.blogspot.ca%2F" class="Popup

    Little Mother of all the Roaches, President-for-Life of the MAC Harlots!
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
    It's a terrible problem. I don't know what the answer is - and I totally get what you're saying, Crimson. We don't want to go from a crummy system to another crummy system that isn't good either. I just know that it makes my heart ache, for want of a better way to put it, knowing that people are ill and suffering and we supposedly live in the richest country that has ever existed.

    We put a man on the moon - surely if there were sufficient will we could come up with a better health care system than we have now. It is so urgent. {{{Juanab}}} {{{ Diaspora}}}
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • curlyarcacurlyarca Posts: 8,449Registered Users
    juanab wrote: »
    curlypearl wrote: »
    JuanaB and Diaspora, I am so deeply, deeply saddened by your situations. Personally, I believe universal healthcare should be as much of a right as universal education. A parent can choose to homeschool, but in cases like yours, there is no option.

    Maybe I am mixing apples and oranges, but it just makes me so sad and angry to read your situations. What kind of country do we live in that permits this. For shame!!!

    I agree with both. Thanks CP. it saddens me that anyone has to go through any of this.

    I have chronic health issues and insurance. Still have a large amount of medical bills. My premiums are outrageous and my husband works for the state of CA.
    I've talked to many many people in Canada, UK and Australia and they don't sing the praises of national health care. In fact, the ones that have lived here in the states and had private health care, prefer it to national health care of Canada.
    Seems it's great for the acute problems but when there's any type of long term, difficult health issue, it's really limited. Appointment times to see a specialist take months to a year. They say they don't have options- with doctors, with prescriptions, with testing, etc.
    Don't get me wrong, I realize that few options are better than no healthcare... but I also know the huge difference in health care from when I had a HMO to my current PPO.
    I'm blessed in that my husband has a good job that offers benefits. Until last year, we were paying over 600$ just for our portion of the premium. The system is a disaster but national health care causes concern too.


    Aren't state workers able to have such great insurance because their insurance comes from state funds (i.e., collective, tax payer dollars)? Your points are already weak, but even further weakened when you explain the great healthcare you have via your husband's state employment. How are you going to complain about how horrible the anecdotes from Canada are? Really? Hundreds of thousands of people pay for you (i.e., state or federal workers and their spouses and dependents) to have benefits (as Canadians do for their neighbors)....while the majority of the public rely on smaller pools from private organizations or worse, no pool at all. That is where I think yes, we should work to give EVERYONE the best healthcare possible instead of this every man for himself mess. Because the truth is when catastrophic illness happens to you, you're going to be looking around with your hand out....and for good reason. Your neighbors should want to give you a hand up in a situation like that. Not ignore you or shake their heads as they walk by and comment on how your own laziness put you in that situation.

    I do think PPACA is a step in the right direction. Sure, I want universal healthcare, too. I agree that it's a shame that we are the last ones to get with the program on this issue. But it's just not going to happen here right now. People in the US care more about individuals than everyone. We're selfish.

    I'd rather (as Ginsburg said during the PPACA arguments) deal with a salvage job rather than a wrecking job with nothing to replace what's been demolished.

    "In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer."

    4a, mbl, low porosity, normal thickness, fine hair.
  • EilonwyEilonwy Posts: 12,389Registered Users
    Reminder:
    We live in a country where people LITERALLY CLAP AND CHEER when they hear about people dying from lack of insurance.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    sleepymeko wrote: »
    Living in Europe really changed my perspective on a bunch of things in this country. Things such as how expensive higher education is and the lack of universal healthcare, which the public doesn't want for some strange reason.

    It's sad I was shocked I didn't have to pay a fee to get my eyes looked at when I lived over there. I just had to pay for the frames. It really bothered me how much this country likes to rob its citizens. I feel like I get charged up the ass for small things.

    I saw citizens in that country helping each other out--it was a strange kind of unity. I feel like here in the States, it's every man for himself and that shouldn't be OK. If we want to succeed as a country, everyone needs to succeed. Not just that 1% that can afford it.

    The city streets there looked cleaner too, everyone was educated, and I never saw a homeless person. Very sad country we live in.

    "A bandaid at the hospital? That will be $250."

    I'm thankful I was on insurance when my gallbladder flared up.

    Actually most people do want a single-payer universal healthcare system in the US! 59% of doctors want it and the % of regular people who want it varies from 60-80% in polls. We just never hear about it because there is a media blackout on single-payer. It is threatening to the insurance and pharmaceutical industries, who fund our politicians. The health insurance industry actually spends millions of dollars each year to propagandize how "bad" national healthcare is. Wendell Potter is great on this, a former insurance company big-whig who exposes their PR campaigns. /home/leaving?target=http%3A%2F%2Fwendellpotter.com%2F" class="Popup

    And I know what you mean about the shock of living in another country-- I lived in London for 6 months and when I got sick, no wait and no bills. It was amazing. You like, get teary-eyed when you realize how much easier and less stressful things could be.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    Eilonwy wrote: »
    Reminder:
    We live in a country where people LITERALLY CLAP AND CHEER when they hear about people dying from lack of insurance.

    Oh gawd, that was so disturbing.
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    Physicians for a National Health Program on the new healthcare legislation: Pro-single-payer doctors: Health bill leaves 23 million uninsured | Physicians for a National Health Program

    And on the same subject on the website of my favorite national single-payer healthcare org (ok, self-promotion, I used to be the director before, ironically, I got sick): Healthcare-NOW! - Against the health care mandate
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • crimsonshedemoncrimsonshedemon Posts: 2,098Registered Users
    curlyarca wrote: »
    juanab wrote: »

    I agree with both. Thanks CP. it saddens me that anyone has to go through any of this.

    I have chronic health issues and insurance. Still have a large amount of medical bills. My premiums are outrageous and my husband works for the state of CA.
    I've talked to many many people in Canada, UK and Australia and they don't sing the praises of national health care. In fact, the ones that have lived here in the states and had private health care, prefer it to national health care of Canada.
    Seems it's great for the acute problems but when there's any type of long term, difficult health issue, it's really limited. Appointment times to see a specialist take months to a year. They say they don't have options- with doctors, with prescriptions, with testing, etc.
    Don't get me wrong, I realize that few options are better than no healthcare... but I also know the huge difference in health care from when I had a HMO to my current PPO.
    I'm blessed in that my husband has a good job that offers benefits. Until last year, we were paying over 600$ just for our portion of the premium. The system is a disaster but national health care causes concern too.


    Aren't state workers able to have such great insurance because their insurance comes from state funds (i.e., collective, tax payer dollars)? Your points are already weak, but even further weakened when you explain the great healthcare you have via your husband's state employment. How are you going to complain about how horrible the anecdotes from Canada are? Really? Hundreds of thousands of people pay for you (i.e., state or federal workers and their spouses and dependents) to have benefits (as Canadians do for their neighbors)....while the majority of the public rely on smaller pools from private organizations or worse, no pool at all. That is where I think yes, we should work to give EVERYONE the best healthcare possible instead of this every man for himself mess. Because the truth is when catastrophic illness happens to you, you're going to be looking around with your hand out....and for good reason. Your neighbors should want to give you a hand up in a situation like that. Not ignore you or shake their heads as they walk by and comment on how your own laziness put you in that situation.

    I do think PPACA is a step in the right direction. Sure, I want universal healthcare, too. I agree that it's a shame that we are the last ones to get with the program on this issue. But it's just not going to happen here right now. People in the US care more about individuals than everyone. We're selfish.

    I'd rather (as Ginsburg said during the PPACA arguments) deal with a salvage job rather than a wrecking job with nothing to replace what's been demolished.
    There's no reason to get upset. I can feel the hostility. It's sad that when someone tries to explain their perspective there's always someone else there to say you are wrong. I'm not bashing Canada's healthcare simply expressing concerns from what I've been told by many.
  • crimsonshedemoncrimsonshedemon Posts: 2,098Registered Users
    curlypearl wrote: »
    It's a terrible problem. I don't know what the answer is - and I totally get what you're saying, Crimson. We don't want to go from a crummy system to another crummy system that isn't good either. I just know that it makes my heart ache, for want of a better way to put it, knowing that people are ill and suffering and we supposedly live in the richest country that has ever existed.

    We put a man on the moon - surely if there were sufficient will we could come up with a better health care system than we have now. It is so urgent. {{{Juanab}}} {{{ Diaspora}}}

    Exactly!! Thank you!
  • diasporadiaspora Posts: 596Registered Users
    A couple curlies in this thread expressed concern that a national healthcare system might be bad too. Some people will, understandably, be wary of any major change to the healthcare system. However, if the myth that we have the best healthcare system in the world wasn't so prevalent, I think people would be more open to change. There is no perfect system, but there are things that are measured that tell us what systems work better than others. The US is at the bottom compared to other wealthy countries (all with national healthcare) on almost all measures. Not providing access to healthcare for all its residents is just 1 of the things the hc system gets wrong :( The profit-motive has no place in healthcare.
    Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: How the Performance of the U.S. Health Care System Compares Internationally, 2010 Update - The Commonwealth Fund
    Formerly Urbancurl.
    Medium-high density, fine-medium, low-normal porosity, 3b/c, permanent color.
    CG, no heat, combs, brushes, parabens.
    Fall/Winter HG=Alba Botanica Soft Hold Style Cream.
    Spring/Summer HG=MGA Sculpting Gel
    Current fave LI=Madre Labs Made by Nature for Baby Conditioner.
    Limit oils, butters, glycerin.
  • EilonwyEilonwy Posts: 12,389Registered Users
    diaspora wrote: »
    However, if the myth that we have the best healthcare system in the world wasn't so prevalent, I think people would be more open to change.
    But we are the best... if by "best" you mean "worse than most of the first world."
  • crimsonshedemoncrimsonshedemon Posts: 2,098Registered Users
    diaspora wrote: »
    A couple curlies in this thread expressed concern that a national healthcare system might be bad too. Some people will, understandably, be wary of any major change to the healthcare system. However, if the myth that we have the best healthcare system in the world wasn't so prevalent, I think people would be more open to change.

    That's most certainly a myth. Our health care system is a disaster. Things need to be changed all over and I have no idea what those changes should be.
«1