CurlTalk

Spinoff: mispronunciations that annoy you

curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
Liberry for LibRary. It's not a fruit.

Fitty for FiFty.

Febuary for FebRuary.

mYsld for misled

monster for muenster. It's cheese not Freddy Krueger.

Chrisant for croissant.
2/c Coarse hair med. density.
Highly porous. Color over grey.
I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
Every day is a gift :flower:
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Comments

  • midgimidgi Posts: 2,409Registered Users
    It's not really a mispronunciation per se, but it bugs me when people say "Neandertall" instead of "NeandertHal."

    Sent from "The Brick"
    I just want to do what I want to do when I want to do it.
  • murrrcatmurrrcat Posts: 9,596Registered Users
    My name
    tumblr_mji9u1Fwza1rh1wv4o1_500.jpg
  • NYCgirlNYCgirl Posts: 236Registered Users
    Pacific instead of SPECIFIC.


    Sent from my DROIDX using CurlTalk App
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  • curlykristxcurlykristx Posts: 445Registered Users
    ^^ my husband does that lol

    and also says "for the FACK of" instead of fact lol
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Sure, there are the usual suspects like supposively, but the one that gets me every time is when people say "verbage" for "verbiage." If you don't know how to pronounce it, say "language" instead.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • sew and sewsew and sew Posts: 3,443Registered Users
    curlypearl wrote: »
    Febuary for FebRuary.
    Although I know the R is in there, I'm guilty of this one more often than naught.

    'Granite' when the person means 'granted.'
    “It was only a sunny smile and little it cost in the giving but like morning light it scattered the night and made the day worth living.” - F. Scott Fitzgerald

    3B ■ Medium/Course ■ High Porosity
  • Rubber BiscuitRubber Biscuit Posts: 1,294Registered Users
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."
    - Seek first to understand, then to be understood.
    - Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you.
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 11,970Registered Users Curl Novice
    A cup of chino? Yikes I never heard that.

    Skinny milk instead of skim milk. How cutesy.
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • wavyblondewavyblonde Posts: 1,637Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Wal-MARK.
    2c/3a with 2b underlayer. Fine, porous. Loves protein. But not hydrolized wheat protein. Yuck.

    Wash: WEN Sweet Almond Mint or Pomegranate
    Gels: LA Looks Sport Gel
    Mousse: Tigi Catwalk Curlesque
    Curling creams/gellies: Coffee Coco Curling Cream Lite, Spiral Solutions Curl Enhancing Jelly, Curls Gel-les'c
    SOTC: JC N&S (LOVE)
    http://public.fotki.com/wavyblonde/hair-2010/
  • coilynappcoilynapp Posts: 4,233Registered Users
    ValentiMe's instead of Valentine's. Drives me nuts.
    th?id=H.4940802350254088&pid=1.7&w=183&h=144&c=7&rs=1
  • HoneycurlsHoneycurls Posts: 1,889Registered Users
    Disclaimer: The following are not in regard to anyone with a true speech impediment or to actual dialects.

    The -tle word ending pronounced as the "oh" sound - especially when used as song lyrics. Example: rhyming "little" with "pillow." It's not pronounced "littow." Blargh.

    In the same vein, mispronouncing anything containing the "th" as the "f" or the "v" sound. People all over the country do it - even highly educated people. Ack.

    Or, mispronouncing the "th" sound as the "d" sound, as in "dis", "dat", and "da" "over" (other). Again, not talking about a true dialect where "th" may actually be pronounced as "d." Gah.

    Something else I've been seeing a great deal of lately: Purposely and repeatedly not using the possessive form: Where is my dad car parked?

    And, avoidance of the words "their" and "there is/are," as in: Where is they house? And: "It's a lot of people in here today."

    Even worse, is writing/typing these mispronunciations phonetically to ensure that people know you talk this way. Why oh why would you intentionally represent yourself as uneducated or as something you're not? I know..."someone" will chime in and try to justify this behavior as being regional or cultural. When this is clearly not the case, it just makes ME view this as ignorant and defiant behavior. Eeep.

    I do have to wonder, though...in places where this could be explained away as a "regional dialect," are students actually taught to speak and write this way in school? And, whether or not they are taught this way in school, do they choose to write this way anyway? Because I see a lot of my family members and many of my son's friends (from all different cultural backgrounds - mostly second-generation) writing this way on FB, and they're learning in the same classrooms alongside my son, who doesn't talk/write that way - and we're black! So, what's up with that?
    OK, I admit it.....I'm an alias! I wasn't born with the name Honeycurls!
    :lurk: Dood, get over it; there's no time limit on lurking.

    I so busy runnin' allllllll over the place and ain't nobody chasin' me! :confused5::laughing5::jocolor:
  • HoneycurlsHoneycurls Posts: 1,889Registered Users
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    Lol! But Diaspora, quinoa, and conch are not that commonly used in many places. You have to admit that quinoa's pronunciation is a bit elusive at first. I pronounced it "qwin-oh-a" until I started eating it and decided to Google it. :error:

    I still find that I have to force myself to remember that it's "conk" and not "conch." I very rarely have occasion to use that word. And, I don't think I've ever even seen the word Diaspora before today. Off to Google it....
    OK, I admit it.....I'm an alias! I wasn't born with the name Honeycurls!
    :lurk: Dood, get over it; there's no time limit on lurking.

    I so busy runnin' allllllll over the place and ain't nobody chasin' me! :confused5::laughing5::jocolor:
  • irociroc Posts: 7,890Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I dont know if this is considered mispronouncing but...

    The boyfriend called me the other day and said 'I got an IRREGARDLESS today!'


    Using my iphone with my toe thumbs. There will be typos.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • MichelleBFTMichelleBFT Posts: 4,812Registered Users
    Expresso instead of espresso. This one makes me pretty stabby. Particularly when people who work in coffee houses say it.

    Posted from my smart phone; please excuse typos or brevity.
    "And politically correct is the worst term, not just because it’s dismissive, but because it narrows down the whole social justice spectrum to this idea that it’s about being polite instead of about dismantling the oppressive social structure of power.
    Fun Fact: When you actively avoid being “PC,” you’re not being forward-thinking or unique. You’re buying into systems of oppression that have existed since before you were even born, and you’re keeping those systems in place."
    Stolen.
  • KurlyPrincessKurlyPrincess Posts: 1,847Registered Users
    NYCgirl wrote: »
    Pacific instead of SPECIFIC.


    Sent from my DROIDX using CurlTalk App

    I have the hardest time pronouncing the word specific.. :lol:
    <3 Our love is like the wind; I can't see it. But I can feel it. <3
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    I think both pronunciations of quinoa are accepted actually. The first maybe more correct, but the second is valid One is just an Anglicization of the word.
  • irociroc Posts: 7,890Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Expresso instead of espresso. This one makes me pretty stabby. Particularly when people who work in coffee houses say it.

    Posted from my smart phone; please excuse typos or brevity.

    Ya, that one's bad. We use that one in making fun all the time.


    Using my iphone with my toe thumbs. There will be typos.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Rubber BiscuitRubber Biscuit Posts: 1,294Registered Users
    Honeycurls wrote: »
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    Lol! But Diaspora, quinoa, and conch are not that commonly used in many places. You have to admit that quinoa's pronunciation is a bit elusive at first. I pronounced it "qwin-oh-a" until I started eating it and decided to Google it. :error:

    I still find that I have to force myself to remember that it's "conk" and not "conch." I very rarely have occasion to use that word. And, I don't think I've ever even seen the word Diaspora before today. Off to Google it....

    I completely agree with you! I am very understanding if the word is new to someone's vocabulary. It only annoys me when someone is familiar with those words/food items. If I can see that they are unfamiliar with them, I just gently repeat the word back with the correct pronunciation and explain the origin, as in the case of quinoa.

    As for diaspora, I was recalling a class in college where the word was a part of daily use, but commonly mispronounced. I was reminded of this when my dad recently said the word incorrectly. I was stunned because he has an admirable vocabulary and understands its meaning. He admitted though, he had only seen the word written, and never spoken. We were discussing the etymology of Puerto Rican Spanish and how the African diaspora played its part.
    - Seek first to understand, then to be understood.
    - Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you.
  • Rubber BiscuitRubber Biscuit Posts: 1,294Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    I think both pronunciations of quinoa are accepted actually. The first maybe more correct, but the second is valid One is just an Anglicization of the word.

    Hmmm, I find that rather odd. English has plenty of words that originate in another language, but do not become commonly "anglicized," especially for food items. Immediately coming to mind are merlot, filet, tortilla, etc.

    As an addendum, these words are a part of my daily vocabulary, and those mispronunciations bother me, on certain occasions, like when a certain coworker mangles many of those words. I genuinely hope noone feels offended, especially if any of those words are not a part of your regular repertoire.
    - Seek first to understand, then to be understood.
    - Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you.
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    I think both pronunciations of quinoa are accepted actually. The first maybe more correct, but the second is valid One is just an Anglicization of the word.

    Hmmm, I find that rather odd. English has plenty of words that originate in another language, but do not become commonly "anglicized," especially for food items. Immediately coming to mind are merlot, filet, tortilla, etc.

    As an addendum, these words are a part of my daily vocabulary, and those mispronunciations bother me, on certain occasions, like when a certain coworker mangles many of those words. I genuinely hope noone feels offended, especially if any of those words are not a part of your regular repertoire.

    I dunno, It's just how my latin american teacher said it in class even though he spoke spanish and mayan (ketch-ee-kal can't spell the real one). I also read it in an NYT article.

    Personally I hate it when people say Bang-gah or Banger for Bangor, Maine. No one except people from away says it like that!! The real downeast pronunciation is much subtler than that more like Bang-gohr. An aspirated r rather than a hard one but a long o.
  • RobinP92202RobinP92202 Posts: 213Registered Users
    When people don't pronounce the "t" in the middle of words, it makes me insane!

    Like pronouncing the name "Dalton" as "Dal Enn" with a big pause in between. Amber from Teen Moms talks like that, sounds so annoying!

    Sent from my Ally using CurlTalk App
    Robin
    *mama to 3 little boys and a 4th due in early March
    *3a shoulder length curls
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  • luvs2sinnngggluvs2sinnnggg Posts: 111Registered Users
    mine is more grammar related.. "how's come", "I seen that", and "alls" as in "alls I heard was...". ugh!! those drive me crazy!!!! but also because, when people say "buh-cuz" and when people drop the g at the end of anything ending with "ing". like huntin' and fishin' lol that drives me crazyyyy
  • MissJMissJ Posts: 196Registered Users
    Supposebly instead of supposedly... A couple people I work with say this. It drives me nuts, but I don't want to correct them.
    3c
  • Rubber BiscuitRubber Biscuit Posts: 1,294Registered Users
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    KookyCurl wrote: »

    I think both pronunciations of quinoa are accepted actually. The first maybe more correct, but the second is valid One is just an Anglicization of the word.

    Hmmm, I find that rather odd. English has plenty of words that originate in another language, but do not become commonly "anglicized," especially for food items. Immediately coming to mind are merlot, filet, tortilla, etc.

    As an addendum, these words are a part of my daily vocabulary, and those mispronunciations bother me, on certain occasions, like when a certain coworker mangles many of those words. I genuinely hope noone feels offended, especially if any of those words are not a part of your regular repertoire.

    I dunno, It's just how my latin american teacher said it in class even though he spoke spanish and mayan (ketch-ee-kal can't spell the real one). I also read it in an NYT article.

    Personally I hate it when people say Bang-gah or Banger for Bangor, Maine. No one except people from away says it like that!! The real downeast pronunciation is much subtler than that more like Bang-gohr. An aspirated r rather than a hard one but a long o.

    Ok, cool. I believe the word comes from a native language in Peru.

    As for "Bang-gah," it makes me nuts when people immitate the various New England accents. There are subtle nuances that distinguish them (like aspirations), and if you're not from there, you sound silly to the locals when you mock them.

    Also, "yous" and "idear" grate on my ears.
    - Seek first to understand, then to be understood.
    - Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you.
  • adst2nvadst2nv Posts: 215Registered Users
    Liberry for library
    Scrimp for shrimp
    Alltimers for Alzheimer's
    4b mostly, with some 4a

    BC'ed: Sept. 2009
    Loving my hair as God intended it to be!! :love7:
  • luvs2sinnngggluvs2sinnnggg Posts: 111Registered Users
    MissJ wrote: »
    Supposebly instead of supposedly... A couple people I work with say this. It drives me nuts, but I don't want to correct them.

    Ohh!! I agree!! that or eXpecially. instead of especially. There is an "sp" not an x!
  • HoneycurlsHoneycurls Posts: 1,889Registered Users
    mine is more grammar related.. "how's come", "I seen that", and "alls" as in "alls I heard was...". ugh!! those drive me crazy!!!! but also because, when people say "buh-cuz" and when people drop the g at the end of anything ending with "ing". like huntin' and fishin' lol that drives me crazyyyy

    :notworthy: Ha, I really was trying not to go there (regarding grammar peeves), but, yeah, the misuse of "seen" is rampant and has been making me crazed of late.

    Some others:

    "Mines"
    "Moms"
    "They is..."
    "You was..."
    KookyCurl wrote: »
    Kind of random, but...

    Diaspora (I've heard dye-AH-spor-a instead of dye-AHS-por-a. Don't hear it too often, though, so correct me if I have it wrong).

    Quinoa (It's keen-wah, not kee-no-ah).

    Edit: Ooooooh and when people say "a cup of chino" instead of cappucino! Or "camalari" instead of calamari. Or pronounce conch phonetically instead of "conk."

    I think both pronunciations of quinoa are accepted actually. The first maybe more correct, but the second is valid One is just an Anglicization of the word.

    Hmmm, I find that rather odd. English has plenty of words that originate in another language, but do not become commonly "anglicized," especially for food items. Immediately coming to mind are merlot, filet, tortilla, etc.

    As an addendum, these words are a part of my daily vocabulary, and those mispronunciations bother me, on certain occasions, like when a certain coworker mangles many of those words. I genuinely hope noone feels offended, especially if any of those words are not a part of your regular repertoire.

    I can only speak for myself, but I wasn't at all offended!
    When people don't pronounce the "t" in the middle of words, it makes me insane!

    Like pronouncing the name "Dalton" as "Dal Enn" with a big pause in between. Amber from Teen Moms talks like that, sounds so annoying!

    Sent from my Ally using CurlTalk App

    Oooops, guilty! Not quite as guilty as Amber, but I know what you mean! I think it sounds a bit persnickety when people pronounce some of the middle "t" words, but I have actually been working on it lately because I know it sounds sloppy and lazy and makes me quite the hypocrite. I also notice this with some words that end in the "t" sound - many of us don't always pronounce that hard "t" sound. Working on it!!

    How about just using plain ol' "cuz" instead of "be-cause." I'm as guilty as sin of that offense!
    OK, I admit it.....I'm an alias! I wasn't born with the name Honeycurls!
    :lurk: Dood, get over it; there's no time limit on lurking.

    I so busy runnin' allllllll over the place and ain't nobody chasin' me! :confused5::laughing5::jocolor:
  • TRBLTRBL Posts: 5,289Registered Users
    Expecially instead of especially, makes me crazy.
    When I grow up, I wanna be a Jiujitsu Turtle!

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  • reenireeni Posts: 149Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    "Axes" instead of "asks". I always picture the executioner with the face mask and big axe when I hear someone say,"I axed him something".
    What a WONDERFUL day!!
  • luvs2sinnngggluvs2sinnnggg Posts: 111Registered Users
    reeni wrote: »
    "Axes" instead of "asks". I always picture the executioner with the face mask and big axe when I hear someone say,"I axed him something".

    haha funny lol that reminds me of when people say "textes". as in multiple texts. lol it's so annoying
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