Cookbooks for Kids

redcelticcurlsredcelticcurls Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Neophyte
My 10 year old niece has developed something of an interest in cooking, and baking in particular. She pulls stuff off of the internet and tries what she can.

But, neither of her parents are all that skilled in the kitchen, so she isn't going to learn the traditional way.

My Mom got her a chef hat and apron an biscuit cuttersfor Christmas. She texted me to tell me all about it with pics included. :lol:

Are there any kid oriented cookbooks that would help? I would surmise that her Mom would supervise her in the kitchen, but I'd like the book to be able to describe stuff since Mom's skills are the weaker out of the parents. Her 11th birthday is in March, and I though a couple of cookbooks would be nice for her.
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Comments

  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    there are tons of cookbooks for kids. i don't know exactly what your niece is into or what type of diet she has, so i can't necessarily recommend a particular book. but when i went to barnes and nobles to get majerle a cookbook (she likes to cook as well) i was suprised at the range of books they had in the children's/youth section--princess and diva, vegetarian, healthy lifestyle, traditional, and even books by celebrity chefs made for children.
  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    I think baking is a good way to start, and with baking, muffins and quickbreads are the simplest items to make. They have the simplest mixing technique (blending method) and are quick. So a book with a focus on those would be good.
    A sandwich and small bites type of book would be good on the savory end.
    I think it would be good to get an idea of what type of food interests her most. Baking or cooking? Maybe she really loves pizza, or macaroni and cheese? Maybe she loves Chinese, Mexican, or Spanish cuisine? If you can narrow that down, it should be a lot easier. :)
    I always enjoyed watching PBS cooking shows growing up. Lidia Bastianich was one of my favorites.
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  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    At 11 I don't think she necessarily needs a kids' book. Maybe just a general, basic cookbook. I love How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. Great for novices but I still find I refer to it all the time
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  • emthefantasticalemthefantastical Posts: 963Registered Users Curl Novice
    I used to have a Pampered Chef kids cookbook that had some great kid-friendly recipes, from appetizers to desserts. Some of the recipes were a little more challenging, and usually those would have a "have an adult help" bit. I still use some of the recipes from it.

    I want to say it is called "Kids in the Kitchen" and I don't remember it being too terribly expensive, and at this point I'm sure you could find it quite cheap on Amazon or something. The only downside to it is that it would say specific tools you would need from Pampered Chef...you wouldn't actually need them, but instead of saying a measuring cup it would say to use whatever Pampered Chef calls their measuring cup, but recipe-wise, I recommend it.
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  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Novice
    geeky wrote: »
    At 11 I don't think she necessarily needs a kids' book. Maybe just a general, basic cookbook. I love How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. Great for novices but I still find I refer to it all the time
    I agree. I grew up using my mom's Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and I still use mine for a lot of the basics. The nice thing about the BH&G cookbook is that it gives ideas for substitutions and such to modify recipes.
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  • lovelovelovelovelovelove Posts: 257Registered Users
    The best cookbook ever IMO..:

    Kids Cook! Fabulous Food for the Whole Family

    I love love loveeee it, it's great for not just kids, but teens and adults too.
    Ca m'a fait de la pé-peine!:love7:
  • subbrocksubbrock Posts: 8,212Registered Users
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    geeky wrote: »
    At 11 I don't think she necessarily needs a kids' book. Maybe just a general, basic cookbook. I love How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. Great for novices but I still find I refer to it all the time
    I agree. I grew up using my mom's Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and I still use mine for a lot of the basics. The nice thing about the BH&G cookbook is that it gives ideas for substitutions and such to modify recipes.

    they actually have a book for kid's called better homes & gardens new juior cookbook.
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Novice
    subbrock wrote: »
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    geeky wrote: »
    At 11 I don't think she necessarily needs a kids' book. Maybe just a general, basic cookbook. I love How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman. Great for novices but I still find I refer to it all the time
    I agree. I grew up using my mom's Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and I still use mine for a lot of the basics. The nice thing about the BH&G cookbook is that it gives ideas for substitutions and such to modify recipes.

    they actually have a book for kid's called better homes & gardens new juior cookbook.
    We had the BH&G junior cookbook when I was a kid! :) My sister got it for her 7th or 8th birthday, so I wonder if it's a bit young for an 11 year old? I remember it had easy-peasy stuff like french toast.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

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    Bonsai Culturist
  • merynmeryn Posts: 1,807Registered Users Curl Novice
    This was my first cookbook. It's geared towards college kids... but it does have lots of easy, kid-friendly recipes.

    Amazon.com: Where's Mom Now That I Need Her?: Surviving Away from Home (0012387401011): Betty Rae Frandsen, Kathryn J. Fransen, Kent P. Fransen: Books
  • SigiSigi Posts: 2,379Registered Users
    meryn wrote: »
    This was my first cookbook. It's geared towards college kids... but it does have lots of easy, kid-friendly recipes.

    Amazon.com: Where's Mom Now That I Need Her?: Surviving Away from Home (0012387401011): Betty Rae Frandsen, Kathryn J. Fransen, Kent P. Fransen: Books

    My mom gave me that book when she moved to a different city. I think I was 19 or 20. I got all sniffly at the title too.
  • redcelticcurlsredcelticcurls Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    Thank your for the suggestions, everyone. I saw so many on Amazon, that I wanted to get some IRL perspectives.

    She is more interested in the baking side at this point, and the girl loves her carbs. She lives in rural Ohio, and she has had pretty limited exposure to non-American cuisines.

    She loves her new biscuit cutters, and she is eager to try them out.

    I like that she is interested in cooking, considering that her parents are apathetic cooks at best.
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  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    I'm not sure if this is too dated or hokey, but this is my first cookbook. I still have it.

    Amazon.com: Holly Hobbie's Cookbook (9780525695257): Holly Hobbie: Books

    Holy crap. I'm in shock how much a new one is.
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  • misspammisspam Posts: 5,318Registered Users
    This book from Williams-Sonoma looks really nice. You can click on the link and look at at some pages of the actual book to get an idea. It's nicely illustrated, gives great tips on organizing ingredients, how to properly measure ingredients, and how to tell when baked goods are done. Many of the reviewers were buying the book for 10-year olds.

    Amazon.com: Williams Sonoma Kids Baking (0749075300546): Abigail J. Dodge: Books

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  • nynaeve77nynaeve77 Posts: 7,135Registered Users Curl Novice
    Is this the niece who was shocked that oranges taste like oranges juice because her parents seldom give her fresh fruits and veggies (forgive me if I have you confused w/ another poster)?

    I learned using my mom's Betty Crocker cookbook, and I was about your niece's age when I started to learn how to cook. It has a lot of easy recipes. Better Homes and Gardens is another good, basic cookbook.
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  • CurlyCanadianCurlyCanadian Posts: 10,904Registered Users, Curl Ambassador Curl Connoisseur
    I started with Fannie Farmer when I was about that age. I had the FF Kids, but it was for things like scrambled eggs and french toast.

    Its a great basics book and has recipes from novice on up.

    The Fannie Farmer Cookbook: Anniversary: Amazon.ca: Marion Cunningham, Fannie Farmer Cookbook Corporation, Archibald Candy Corporation: Books
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  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    Ooh, I like the Fannie Farmer suggestion, and misspam's as well.
    I was thinking The Joy of Cooking, but I wasn't sure if a kid would like that one.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • redcelticcurlsredcelticcurls Posts: 17,502Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    nynaeve77 wrote: »
    Is this the niece who was shocked that oranges taste like oranges juice because her parents seldom give her fresh fruits and veggies (forgive me if I have you confused w/ another poster)?

    I learned using my mom's Betty Crocker cookbook, and I was about your niece's age when I started to learn how to cook. It has a lot of easy recipes. Better Homes and Gardens is another good, basic cookbook.

    Yes, same niece, poor kid, She had only had orange juice, and not an orange, until my mom gave her one about 5 years ago. She seemed so shocked that oranges had orange juice in them. I know that my brother was taught better than that.

    Considering all that, I think it's great that she is developing an interest in food and cooking. Goodness knows she will have to do much on her own. Even if all she gets to do is read them, it's something. I hope she keeps her interest up until she can get out on her own and cook. My mom visited them for Christmas, so my mom had her helping out with dinner.

    I did pick up the BH&G Jr one when I was out tonight. I like the Fannie Farmer and WS ones also.

    I had a Hollie Hobbie cookbook as a kid! I swear that mine had a blue cover though.
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  • SariaSaria Posts: 15,963Registered Users
    I thought of a suggestion. Well, more than one.

    In The Sweet Kitchen by Regan Daley offers a lot of baking info plus recipes. It's been on my wish list for a while!
    Amazon.com: In The Sweet Kitchen: The Definitive Baker's Companion (9781579652081): Regan Daley: Books

    The Cook's Book is one I've had on my list for a while as well. The appeal for me is that they managed to get the likes of Pierre Herme, Dan Lepard, Ferran Adria, and Christine Manfield. It's really more a book for beginners though.
    Amazon.com: The Cook's Book: Techniques and tips from the world's master chefs (9780756613020): Jill Norman: Books

    Finally, I think she'd do very well with Chez Panisse Desserts. Lindsay Shere was the inspiration for many pastry chefs today and this book teaches how to make simple classic desserts, from crisps to ice cream.
    por-que-no-te-callas.jpg
  • nynaeve77nynaeve77 Posts: 7,135Registered Users Curl Novice
    nynaeve77 wrote: »
    Is this the niece who was shocked that oranges taste like oranges juice because her parents seldom give her fresh fruits and veggies (forgive me if I have you confused w/ another poster)?

    I learned using my mom's Betty Crocker cookbook, and I was about your niece's age when I started to learn how to cook. It has a lot of easy recipes. Better Homes and Gardens is another good, basic cookbook.

    Yes, same niece, poor kid, She had only had orange juice, and not an orange, until my mom gave her one about 5 years ago. She seemed so shocked that oranges had orange juice in them. I know that my brother was taught better than that.
    How cool that she's getting into cooking! :) It's good that she's taking initiative to teach herself; maybe she'll be a good example to her parents.
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  • sarah42sarah42 Posts: 4,034Registered Users
    I had the Better Homes & Gardens Junior Cookbook when I was a kid, and it was great. My mom had the first edition of it when she was a youngster, too. My 3-year-old has a great interest in cooking and kitchen stuff, so I'll probably get it for him when he's a bit older.
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  • LotsawavesLotsawaves Posts: 9,765Registered Users Curl Virtuoso
    Stone Hill Books - Teena In The Kitchen ~ 1950s Texas Imperial Sugar Cookbook

    This was my 1st cookbook. If it wasn't so much money I'd buy it. It's vintage, like me.:happy11:
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