Are you a teacher?

The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,754Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
Do you have any tips? I'm sorry, that's vague. But I recently started teaching (makeup, etc). And I find it tough! I feel so on-the-spot and I don't know what to say. I feel disorganized and like I'm rambling. I know my stuff, but I still didn't feel prepared.

Any teachers here? Help...?!
montage-3.gif No MAS.

I am the new Black.

"Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

Comments

  • curlypearlcurlypearl Posts: 12,210Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Phoenix, I'm not sure I can help but I've done some teaching. I taught intermediate school English, and later on, software in a nonprofit office, mostly one-on-one. That's very different from makeup.

    I think it's great that you're doing that! Are you applying the makeup to customers? Can you explain in more detail how it works - do you have makeup that you are selling? Is it a class or one-on-one? Who are you teaching?

    There are a lot of videos demonstrating makeup application. If you watch some that seem helpful to you, you could copy some of their advice. Also if you watch What Not to Wear, you can borrow some of Carmindy's techniques. Also, if you are near a good dept. store, let some of the sales people apply makeup to you - there usually isn't any charge, and you might get ideas from their approaches. HTH.
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  • dia99dia99 Posts: 1,998Registered Users
    Hi, Phoenix!

    Make-up classes seem so fun and interesting (and challenging!).

    Here are some tips I have from reading lots on adult learning, and from trying to keep 100+ teachers interested on any given PD day, or a class full of graduate students engaged after a full day's work. Some assume your class is recurring, but I use a variation of these even for our 1-day PDs:

    Start with something that activates their prior knowledge and is fun. It could be a quiz on techniques and you have a prize for the winner. Or, you might have a picture of a beautifully made up face that highlights whichever feature you're going to teach that day (eyes, lips, etc.). Then, you could have the students/clients talk in pairs/groups to figure out what tools you used to achieve those results, or what colors you blended...

    At least every 10 minutes, have an active learning experience where the students get to practice whatever you've just talked about. It could just be a "turn and chat" where you give them 2 minutes to discuss what you've said and come up with a question or comment. Or, it could be applying the technique on a mannequin or partner. I love these because it gives me the opportunity to go around and talk with people more intimately, which I'm much more comfortable with than standing in front of a room.

    Ask lots of questions of your class. Have some open-ended questions ready before class. This allows you to gauge their understanding in a nonthreatening manner, and gives you a break from talking :). What colors would you use on this skin tone? How would you talk a client out of a bad color choice?. The best question you can ask of any class is, "What do you want to get out of this class?" and then incorporate those ideas into what you plan to the maximum extent. Most of the time what students want to know is already in my plans, but it gets great brownie points when I can specifically reference someone who's asked about something previously and address their concerns directly.

    Don't try to teach too much in one class. Have a clear target of no more than one major skill/concept/strategy per half hour, and know how you'll determine if you've reached your goal (will the students need to demonstrate the skill in class; will you provide homework that they can bring in pictures of the next week; etc.). This way, you can activate prior knowledge, introduce and instruct on topic, provide practice time, ask/answer questions, and provide closure without being rushed. There might be a couple of sub-skills involved in the major skill, but it's really important to have your goal in mind before you start teaching. It helps you to stay on topic in your instruction, and steer students back to your topic during questions/answers.

    Use humor, and make fun of yourself, especially!! Talk about mistakes you've made. If you have pictures of those mistakes, even better! This would even be a great icebreaker for the beginning of a class that could also serve as your intro activity (What's wrong with this picture?). Humility goes a long way in making your audience respect your expertise even more. It also makes students more comfortable making mistakes, which means they'll be more participatory in your active learning opportunities.

    Do partner and small group work as much as possible rather than having only lecture and independent practice. It helps for students to get immediate feedback, and again gives you more opportunities to float and provide differentiated support to those pairs/groups who need it. It's also just more fun than sitting listening to a lecturer speak for a long time, or everybody answering one by one. Have defined roles for partners or groups so they don't have to figure out what they should be doing (you don't need to say who will do what, but do need to say what you want to happen). This includes giving them times up front for how long they'll have to accomplish their tasks, how many "turns" they should take, etc.

    I hope it's helpful and not obnoxious or too nerdy. I read a lot about this for my job and I love people learning and being excited about it at the same time!
    People rise to the standard expected of them. GC
  • WileE-DeadWileE-Dead Banned Posts: 24,963Banned Users Curl Neophyte
    Hopefully JennyC will see this.
    She used to do this & I think still may.
    She might have some tips for you!:blob4:
    0004.gif

    Ever since the sports thread wars I have sensed a special connection between [edit] & Wile. Like the connection oil has to water. I almost can't speak of it. Wait....my eyes are misting. ~asq
    Let’s just stay together and tell the world to kiss our ass. ~P


  • Myradella3Myradella3 Posts: 2,481Registered Users
    Exactly what are you teaching to whom? Where? The context?
  • The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,754Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Thanks, everyone!

    Dia, great tips! That was very detailed. I appreciate it. I think I can incorporate all of those ideas into my classes.

    Myradella3 wrote: »
    Exactly what are you teaching to whom? Where? The context?
    curlypearl wrote: »
    I think it's great that you're doing that! Are you applying the makeup to customers? Can you explain in more detail how it works - do you have makeup that you are selling? Is it a class or one-on-one? Who are you teaching?

    CP and Myradella,

    For the most part I'll be applying makeup to students at a modeling/acting school. However on Thursday I had to teach a class just about eyebrows. I had four modeling students and they were all great. But it was harder than I expected. I thought, because I know the subject pretty well, it'd be easy to wing it and not be too scripted. But teaching is a skill unto itself. Some things that are basic to me and require little to no thought anymore aren't as easy for everyone else. It's hard to take a step back and figure out how to convey the information in a way that's clear to a newbie.

    Plus, I wasn't given much direction, just to teach an intro class about eyebrows. The other teachers on staff are way more seasoned, not just in their particular fields of expertise but in teaching itself.

    So I went online and cobbled together some information for a handout. But I think I forgot to go over a lot of it because I was nervous.

    Thank goodness I don't have to sell anything in this position.
    montage-3.gif No MAS.

    I am the new Black.

    "Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.
  • ninja dogninja dog Posts: 23,780Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I taught journalism at a local college.

    I found that much of what resonated was my attitude; if I was alert and funny, the students responded. In your class, I would have a "good v. bad" eyebrows session, to provoke discussion. Provide one interactive task per class.

    I would love to attend, btw. I'll bet you're a master (mistress?)!
  • KindredGhost1983KindredGhost1983 Posts: 1,187Registered Users
    Best advice I ever got:

    "Teaching kids to count is fine, but teaching them what counts is best"

    "If you can see up it, down it, through it, don't wear it"

    "Don't smile until Christmas"
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    www.myspace.com/agilruth
  • KookyCurlKookyCurl Posts: 1,980Registered Users
    You've got some great tips there! Handouts are excellent. Be sure to include visual representations as well as descriptions. Find as many ways to present your info as you can even if you don't use them all you'll be able to reach a wider variety of learners.

    Have them teach each other. Students retain 90% of what they teach so have them master a technique and show others or some tips etc. (This can work better with a larger group but i think would be fun with a small group like you had.)

    Practice! Enlist some friends to go over it with or just run through it in your car, while doing your hair, cooking etc.

    Write it down! I have found that even if you know your info cold at least sketch out what you want to cover, activities you want to do, key information etc. I found this a huge help when I was teaching. I knew my content cold but still can get flustered with questions or even worse blank stares. A lesson plan of sorts will help keep you on track esp. if you've lost your place or wander off on a side path. Make notes of things that worked and what didn't so you can refine it. They make great references as well.

    Check in with them often to make sure they're understanding the info you're giving. This will help you know the efficacy of what you're doing as well as help you head off misunderstandings before they get too big. It can be something as simple as them repeating what you just did back to you or you do one then they do the next etc.

    Make it fun! Have them try and identify famous brows or something like that. It would make a great intro activity.

    You have an advantage in that demonstration and hands on stuff is pretty integral to what you are teaching. The more they can "do" they more they'll remember.

    Be yourself. Share that you're nervous, they'll understand.
  • The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,754Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    Thanks again!!
    montage-3.gif No MAS.

    I am the new Black.

    "Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.
  • The New BlackThe New Black Posts: 16,754Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    I taught a second class on Sunday. It went great and it was fun! I can feel myself getting better at the whole teaching thing. Some of the students' mothers wanted to sit in class and we had one male student, which both could've thrown me off a bit. But it turned out fine. We also had a new teacher come in to observe and he happens to be a guy (our first male MU instructor). So he offered his POV and that worked out well.

    I had the students determine their face shapes by standing in front of a mirror and outlining their faces (on the mirror) using a marker. At first they were like, "Wha? You want us to actually draw on the mirror?" And it's harder to do than it seems. It got them giggling. Then they did their own makeup based on what I'd taught and I took some digital pics so they could see what their MU looks like in color and B&W photography. The last part of class, we did a mock photo shoot to get them loosened up a bit and to give them ideas for poses when they have to do a real photo shoot.

    Thanks, again, for all the advice! It was all helpful, especially the following:
    Write it down! I have found that even if you know your info cold at least sketch out what you want to cover, activities you want to do, key information etc. I found this a huge help when I was teaching. I knew my content cold but still can get flustered with questions or even worse blank stares. A lesson plan of sorts will help keep you on track esp. if you've lost your place or wander off on a side path. Make notes of things that worked and what didn't so you can refine it. They make great references as well.

    I would've lost my place many times if I hadn't created a lesson place for myself.
    montage-3.gif No MAS.

    I am the new Black.

    "Hope the Mail are saving space tomorrow for Samantha Brick's reaction piece on the reactions to her piece about the reactions to her piece." ~ Tweet reposted by Rou.

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