Overeating help?

Vanessa24Vanessa24 Registered Users Posts: 11
Hi everyone, I was wondering if anyone had some advice for a problem I have, you have all been so helpful in terms of hair, I'm thinking health should be no problem for you!
A couple of years ago, I got down super, super skinny, about 85 lbs (I'm 5'0, so thats not horrendously skinny, but still pretty slim), I wouldn't say I was anorexic, but I definitely have some food issues. Today I'm about 108, but I keep overeating. Right now, my metabolism can handle it, but I'm starting to notice some weight gain, ideally I'd like to be about 105ish. I know 3 lbs doesn't seem like a lot, but when you are 5 feet, it is!
After restricting myself from food, I feel like now I don't know how to eat properly, I usually start off good, but if I eat one "bad" thing, it's like a tailspin.... I'll eat chocolate, chips, puddings, whatever is available. It's like I don't even enjoy the food, but I just feel this compulsion to eat. I'm starting to get really nervous, and I feel incredibly guilty when I overeat. So basically, it's one extreme or the other, a "good day" (yogurts, fruits, veggies, air popped popcorn) or a "bad day" (anything sweet and fatty).

Any advice?

Comments

  • MimsTXMimsTX Registered Users Posts: 3,482 Curl Neophyte
    Overeating and binge eating, which is what it sounds like your issues could be heading towards, are every bit as much of an eating disorder as anorexia or bulimia. It took me a LONG time to realize that and honestly, acknowledging that it's an actual mental illness and not just me having no will power makes things a TON better for me. The compulsion to eat and the guilt that comes after are SO much like the trademark symptoms of bulimia.... it's scary.

    The biggest thing I can say is not to beat yourself up over slip ups. SO you have a cookie... accept that you didn't eat the healthiest thing in the world, realize it doesn't totally skew your plans and goals and reaffirm your vow to do better. it's that mental attitude of "Oh well I've screwed up might as well do whatever for the rest of the day" that gets you into trouble.

    I've not found a way to stop the impulses though. While I can sometimes control my response to them, I almost ALWAYS feel the urge to binge like that. It's worse when I'm stressed or anxious or depressed... and then giving into it always ends up increasing those feelings. Try distracting yourself... do something that keeps your hands busy (painting my finger nails helps tremendously... I don't want to mess them up and the drying time is just long enough that the worst of the urge is past by the time I could eat). Honestly though, the best thing you could do is probably talk to a doctor, therapist or a nutritionist. I can't tell you what they'd say... I've yet to get up the guts to talk to one myself. But I know that's probably the only way I'm ever going to completely kick the habit.
    CG/Mod CG (soap bars) since 8/12/08
    CO wash/Cond: Kathymack & Flowermoon Castille soap bars, V05 Chamomile Tea, Suave Ocean Breeze, Biolage Conditioning Balm
    Styling loves: DIFFUSING! CK, KCNT, KCCC, FOTE (on dry hair only), Re:coil, Proclaim gel
    Not sure about: Boots, Tweek, KBB Milk, DMHJ
    HATE: plopping, FOTE on wet hair, BRHG
  • curlyjenn10curlyjenn10 Registered Users Posts: 2,034
    This is something I've struggled with for years. I'm definitely an emotional eater and the overeating/guilt trip has been a vicious cycle.

    I've been able to conquer it (for the most part) by getting rid of the restrictions I had placed on myself. My only rule is I can only eat when I'm hungry, and stop when I'm full. I think this was suggested on a different thread during the summer (can't remember who!) Before, I would start out good and then slip up at some point and feel horrible for the rest of the day. Without the restrictions, I don't get the craving for something that's "forbidden" or the major guilt-trip afterwards. If I start to get a craving but I'm not hungry, I remind myself I can always eat it later when I am hungry.

    It sounds really simple and I was skeptical at first, but it's worked well so far. I don't really get the compulsion to eat anymore. I've actually lost weight, while still enjoying "bad" foods every day. Now I'm working on eating when I'm not distracted and incorporating more healthy foods and exercise into my routine.

    ETA: Not sure if this will help, but I also bought a workbook to help deal with the emotional side of compulsive eating - Why Weight? by Geneen Roth. It's helped me understand how I became a compulsive eater and how my thoughts and attitudes about weight and life reinforced the eating. It's hard to explain, but it's helped a lot! Good luck!
    CG since 6/15/08!
    Medium-Fine/Normal Porosity

    http://collegecurly.blogspot.com/
  • ShrekLoverShrekLover Registered Users Posts: 2,551 Curl Neophyte
    This is something I've struggled with for years. I'm definitely an emotional eater and the overeating/guilt trip has been a vicious cycle.

    I've been able to conquer it (for the most part) by getting rid of the restrictions I had placed on myself. My only rule is I can only eat when I'm hungry, and stop when I'm full. I think this was suggested on a different thread during the summer (can't remember who!) Before, I would start out good and then slip up at some point and feel horrible for the rest of the day. Without the restrictions, I don't get the craving for something that's "forbidden" or the major guilt-trip afterwards. If I start to get a craving but I'm not hungry, I remind myself I can always eat it later when I am hungry.

    It sounds really simple and I was skeptical at first, but it's worked well so far. I don't really get the compulsion to eat anymore. I've actually lost weight, while still enjoying "bad" foods every day. Now I'm working on eating when I'm not distracted and incorporating more healthy foods and exercise into my routine.

    ETA: Not sure if this will help, but I also bought a workbook to help deal with the emotional side of compulsive eating - Why Weight? by Geneen Roth. It's helped me understand how I became a compulsive eater and how my thoughts and attitudes about weight and life reinforced the eating. It's hard to explain, but it's helped a lot! Good luck!

    The bolded is the whole premise of "I Can Make You Thin". Get the book (it comes with a CD) and check out his website:

    http://www.mckenna.com/Default.aspx?redirect=true

    I saw him on TV a few years ago, he is really great. He makes complete sense.
  • curlypearlcurlypearl Registered Users Posts: 12,231 Curl Connoisseur
    I'm sorry you're going through this. The only words of wisdom I can offer is that making certain foods "forbidden" never works. The more you restrict yourself, the more you are tempted.

    There's an old saying "the only way to get rid of a temptation is to give in to it." I'm not sure I have that exactly right, but that's the gist of it.

    Some sort of counseling might help, but I would try somehow, to give yourself "permission" to eat some "bad" foods every day. Really plan to have some treats - some really "bad" ones and enjoy them. Not all at once, but a good dose of pleasurable treats several times a day. Sort of like judo - for food - so you are making the temptation work for you by deliberately giving into it, instead of fighting it which is a losing battle.

    You may go crazy with it at first, but knowing that each day you can enjoy yourself may help it to level off. Please let us know how you are doing. :love5:
    2/c Coarse hair med. density.
    Highly porous. Color over grey.
    I love all the Curl Junkie products. Still experimenting with gels and curl creams. Still hoping for 2nd day hair....
    Every day is a gift :flower:
  • Vanessa24Vanessa24 Registered Users Posts: 11
    Thanks everyone, you are all so sweet:)

    I've been trying to deal with incorporating "bad" foods daily, and seeing how that goes. Honestly, I was slightly freaking out over eating a cookie on a weekday, but I just managed to eat one cookie, so all was good. So far, so good, I almost think that I needed my freakout to realize that something needs to change. I plan on checking out the websites/books.

    Thanks again
  • IAgirlIAgirl Registered Users Posts: 2,540 Curl Neophyte
    Read all you can, sweetie. If you've starved (or "semi-starved") yourself, then you've totally changed your outlook on food and created a rigid dictatorship in your mind about eating and self-control in general.
    I understand what you're going through.
    Keep everything in perspective. Sometimes when you find yourself with a handful of chocolate chips that is going to make you feel guilty, it may be because you needed some calories earlier in the day (or week!) and didn't get them. Trust me here! I find that a healthy afternoon snack (a little carbohydrate, a little protein) ended my evening raids on the chocolate chips!

    A cookie (or anything else "bad") is a good thing and please give yourself permission to enjoy every single bite without guilt. Breathe while you eat, it calms you and allows your sense of smell to add to the sensory pleasure of eating. If you're going for another cookie ask yourself -- is this necessary, do I want it? Will I enjoy it?
    I totally agree about incorporating the foods that make you freak out. Now that I have a healthy attitude about food, I look forward to them.

    I would encourage you to keep reading, but also seek out the assistance of a dietitian if you can. Tell them what's going on when you call to make the appointment and don't be worried, they've heard it a million times. If they haven't -- then move along to someone else.
    These folks can give you a ton of perspective on food and how to think about it and help you set up a plan for how to work, even give you encouragement and accountability.

    Respect food for its nutrition, the energy invested in producing it, and respect yourself. Every day you must move forward, give yourself energy and be flexible.

    When you feel the compulsion to eat -- if you can get through it, write down or talk out how you feel. Anxious? Angry? Tense? Annoyed?

    Aha! Those emotions were what caused the compulsion to eat (or to restrict food). Those are what needs addressing. It would be great if that were simple to do, it takes years of work. But better to work on coping with life and emotions than eating problems. It's worth it.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file