Painting Kitchen Cabinets?

rockthecurlzrockthecurlz Posts: 910Registered Users
My house was built in the 50's and has pine cabinets. Mine have the big black circles throughout, and I don't care for them. I don't have the money to remodel, and thought about painting them. I have heard of some people doing this and having them turn out fine. I'm scared to do it myself though. Any experiences doing this to your cabinets? Advice? I'm also going to redo my flooring in the kitchen and bathrooms eventually. I'm not sure what materials and prices are best...

Comments

  • M2LRM2LR Posts: 8,630Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    We just did ours a few months ago, as we don't have money for a full remodel either.

    We bought some heavy duty cleaner at Lowe's/Home Depot (I can't remember the name), but it basically takes off any dirt and grime, etc. Then we lightly sanded them, and wiped them down. We painted the flat parts with a roller, and the more curved parts we used a small brush. We also had to do two coats. You shoudl also remove the doors from the cabinets and remove any hardware before you sand and paint.

    They turned out pretty good. You can't see brush or roller strokes, and the price wasn't bad since we couldn't remodel. We will probably remodel some day, but this will have to hold us over for a bit. :)

    It is time consuming, I will say that. It took us a lot longer than we thought. We also did buy new hardware, so that was a bit of an expense, but still not bad.
    :rambo:
  • IAgirlIAgirl Posts: 2,540Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    All I can add to that is that if the black circles are painted on, a cleaner might work, or you might have to use a stripper which remove varnish, paint, stain etc. There are ones which are better for your lungs and eyes and skin these days than when I used them 18 years ago. Also, there is a paint called "Kilz" which covers dark marks pretty well. We use it as a primer. It covered sharpie marks, so that's pretty darn good. I think painting is a really cool thing to do. I hate doing it, but I like the results.
    Never believe any label that tells you you can use just one coat. You need two. No matter what.
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Novice
    I replaced all the cabinet doors in my kitchen for about $800, including shipping and hinges. The hardware and other supplies were around $100. It looks so much better than painting would have looked and it really wasn't that difficult to do. The hardest part was the measuring.
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • RedCatWavesRedCatWaves Posts: 31,259Registered Users Curl Connoisseur
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    I replaced all the cabinet doors in my kitchen for about $800, including shipping and hinges. The hardware and other supplies were around $100. It looks so much better than painting would have looked and it really wasn't that difficult to do. The hardest part was the measuring.



    I vote for this solution. You can still paint the rest of the cabinet if you want to, but new doors will be so much better than painted ones.

    If you do decide to paint everything, do it right...which means lots and lots of preparation:

    Remove all doors
    Remove all hardware
    Clean thoroughly with acidic cleaner made for this purpose
    Sand to remove all shine/shine from the old finish
    Paint 2 coats
    Possibly use a top sealer coat

    It is a LOT of work to properly paint out kitchen cabinets. It will probably take many days, because you have to allow plenty of drying time.
  • rockthecurlzrockthecurlz Posts: 910Registered Users
    I was doing a google search and saw something about refacing? That is basically the same thing as your ideas of replacing the doors right?
  • mrspoppersmrspoppers Posts: 7,223Registered Users Curl Novice
    I was doing a google search and saw something about refacing? That is basically the same thing as your ideas of replacing the doors right?
    Yep. I ordered mine through www.newdoors.com because they were inexpensive and they promised them faster than a lot of other places. They were awesome when I had questions about measuring and they were ready to ship in a week or two. I actually didn't order veneer because my cabinets were already white and the new doors matched perfectly.

    Here is a picture of how they turned out. Keep in mind that this is an interim solution until we add on to the house and put in a completely new kitchen. Also, I'm not doing the floor until I have a job so that's still the old vinyl.

    28487_397257793700_824848700_3995903_3817381_n.jpg
    When are women going to face the fact that they don’t know their own bodies as well as men who have heard things?

    Don Langrick
    Bonsai Culturist
  • KurlyKaeKurlyKae Posts: 3,413Registered Users Curl Neophyte
    I painted the kitchen cabinets in my last house. They looked great, if I do say so, myself. One thing to add to the advice previously given: use oil based paint. It's more work to clean up, and takes longer to dry, but it's also more durable. That's important for the kitchen. In the four years I lived there after painting the cabinets, we didn't have one knick or scratch in the paint.

    Mrs. Poppers, your kitchen looks great!
    3a/2c
    Trader Joe's Tingle conditioner wash/ conditioner
    AG re:coil, LALooks gel, John Frieda Secret Weapon
  • rockthecurlzrockthecurlz Posts: 910Registered Users
    mrspoppers wrote: »
    I was doing a google search and saw something about refacing? That is basically the same thing as your ideas of replacing the doors right?
    Yep. I ordered mine through www.newdoors.com because they were inexpensive and they promised them faster than a lot of other places. They were awesome when I had questions about measuring and they were ready to ship in a week or two. I actually didn't order veneer because my cabinets were already white and the new doors matched perfectly.

    Here is a picture of how they turned out. Keep in mind that this is an interim solution until we add on to the house and put in a completely new kitchen. Also, I'm not doing the floor until I have a job so that's still the old vinyl.

    28487_397257793700_824848700_3995903_3817381_n.jpg


    Thank you for sharing your picture and link! I wish my kitchen even looked half as nice as yours. That gives me hope that I can make mine look better. I think changing out the doors and hardware along with painting the rest is my best option. I'm not sure when I'm going to get started. I would love to do so soon. Thanks again to all of the replies :)
  • SystemSystem Posts: 39,059 Administrator
    The black spots are the knots in the pine, right? It's hard to paint knotty pine and have it come out well, because those knots have a lot of sap in them and they tend to bleed through. You definitely want to put several coats of KILZ over the knots.
  • rockthecurlzrockthecurlz Posts: 910Registered Users
    SuZenGuide wrote: »
    The black spots are the knots in the pine, right? It's hard to paint knotty pine and have it come out well, because those knots have a lot of sap in them and they tend to bleed through. You definitely want to put several coats of KILZ over the knots.


    Yep, it is. Thank you for the advice. That was actually one of my concerns.

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