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2 food questions (please)

paulahhpaulahh Posts: 16Registered Users
Number one:

What is Sazon Goya con Culantro y Achiote? (reading straight from the back of the can)It says "one packet"...

Number two:

Can flatbread or pita be made at home? I have yeast, white flour, and wheat flour on hand. A Saudi friend of mine used to bring her mom's flatbread to work all the time and it was so tasty. I've since lost touch w/her.

I am SO tired of buying moldy, melon-smelling pita and flatbread at the grocery stores. You know how it is when certain items don't sell well enough to get a good turnaround time.....

Thanks in abundance!!! icon_biggrin.gif
"He who laughs last...thinks slowest."

"If you don't get in the kitchen and bake your Grandmama's celebrated cushaw pie, who will?"

Comments

  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    Sazon Goya is our hispanic/all purpose seasoning. Among other things it
    contains garlic, salt, pepper & oregano. The variety you mentioned with
    Culantro & Achiote has cilantro & Annatto (a red food coloring that is used
    a lot in caribbean cooking).

    Re: your second question, yes you can probably make it. My mom's
    pakistani friend used to give her Roti all the time. I'm pretty sure you don't
    even need the yeast (because it's a flat bread) although with the modern
    spongey pitas it might be necessary. I suggest doing a search on google
    for a Roti/flatbread recipe as each culture has their own.
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    Oh, and I forgot to mention that unless you loooove Cumin, I would buy the
    Sazon Goya variety that doesn't have this. Cumin is a very cuban spice
    (we dominicans don't eat it) and it's quite an acquired taste since if
    overdone it tastes like you're in a Turkish sauna licking some old guy's
    pits. I've learned to use cumin in certain dishes but only in moderation.
  • paulahhpaulahh Posts: 16Registered Users
    Dang what a nasty vision that conjures up...

    Is cumin "cumin" in Spanish, or spelled another way? Just so I'll recognize the word and avoid it (for right now, anyway)

    I'm going to sniff around now for a flatbread recipe! (Unless someone here has one)

    Thanks Marielle icon_biggrin.gif
    "He who laughs last...thinks slowest."

    "If you don't get in the kitchen and bake your Grandmama's celebrated cushaw pie, who will?"
  • PartyHairPartyHair Posts: 7,713Registered Users
    You should ask the roti question on the non-hair board. I seem to remember several curlies mentioning they know how to make it (Webbie, maybe? Not sure on that, but maybe).
    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Rock on with your bad self.

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    Be excellent to each other. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    I tried to make naan once and failed miserably at it. There's two things I cannot do right in the kitchen - make bread and boil an egg.

    I get roti sent to me by mail from my folks.
    The frozen paratha in indian/pakistani grocery stores are pretty good.


    Also, to make west indian style roti you need something called a tawah which is a big round flat cast iron disk. Like if you took a wok and flattened it. I've never seen one sold in stores and I have no clue where you can purchase one.
    hello.world.
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    Cumin is "comino" is spanish. Coriander is also similar to cumin but it's
    usually referred to this in Asian recipes.
  • GretchenGretchen Administrator Posts: 8,979Administrators, Moderators Administrator
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by webjockey:
    I tried to make naan once and failed miserably at it. There's two things I cannot do right in the kitchen - make bread and boil an egg.

    I get roti sent to me by mail from my folks.
    The frozen paratha in indian/pakistani grocery stores are pretty good.


    Also, to make west indian style roti you need something called a tawah which is a big round flat cast iron disk. Like if you took a wok and flattened it. I've never seen one sold in stores and I have no clue where you can purchase one.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Webbie, have you tried Phoenecia's (sp?) flatbread? It's delicious. There are two Phoenecias in Austin — S. Lamar and Burnet at 45thish.
    I don't know the tawah, but sounds like a comal might work; I'm sure you could buy those in Austin.

    Gretchen
    NaturallyCurly.com co-founder
    3A

    You are beautiful!
  • webjockeywebjockey Posts: 2,786Registered Users
    never tried Phonecians. Will do!
    hello.world.
  • GretchenGretchen Administrator Posts: 8,979Administrators, Moderators Administrator
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by webjockey:
    never tried Phonecians. Will do!<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Get the chicken garlic "sandwich" when you're there. It's awesome.

    Gretchen
    NaturallyCurly.com co-founder
    3A

    You are beautiful!
  • geekygeeky Posts: 4,995Registered Users
    I found this roti recipe on Epicurious
    To Trenell, MizKerri and geeky:
    I pray none of you ever has to live in a communist state.

    Geeky is my hero. She's the true badass. The badass who doesn't even need to be a badass. There aren't enough O's in cool to describe her.
  • On a hillOn a hill Posts: 3Registered Users
    I've made both pita bread and chapati. Although flat, pita bread does have yeast in it. If you know how to make bread, making pita won't be hard for you.

    I made chapati under the supervision of an Indian friend, but when I tried to make it myself it didn't come out all that well! Chapati does not have yeast in it.
  • Summer91Summer91 Posts: 265Registered Users
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Marielle:
    Oh, and I forgot to mention that unless you loooove Cumin, I would buy the
    Sazon Goya variety that doesn't have this. Cumin is a very cuban spice
    (we dominicans don't eat it) and it's quite an acquired taste since if
    overdone it tastes like you're in a Turkish sauna licking some old guy's
    pits. I've learned to use cumin in certain dishes but only in moderation.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    ITA. I don't care for cumin and found this out the hard way. I went out and bought some for a new curry dish I wanted to make. When I opened it....whooo! To me it tastes and smells like sweaty pits, just like Marielle said. So now I have a full bottle of cumin just sitting in my cupboard.

    I don't get why people would use it. What taste are they trying to achieve with it?
  • marielle448marielle448 Posts: 1,823Registered Users
    Summer, I can take it in tiny amounts in some cuban cooking and also
    Indian cooking. I've deduced that it's because these foods tend to be
    heavily seasoned/spiced anyway so the cumin is kind of like a musky
    undertone. I'll eat it in chili too but I HATE that the smell lingers in my
    house unless I spray air freshener.

    Slightly off topic, my aunt was on an ethnic kick several decades ago and
    made some beef stirfry with ginger. Apparently she used powdered and
    the lid fell off while she was shaking it into the meat. I kept asking my
    mom why the beef tasted like my dad's speedstick deoderant.
  • Summer91Summer91 Posts: 265Registered Users
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Marielle:
    Summer, I can take it in tiny amounts in some cuban cooking and also
    Indian cooking. I've deduced that it's because these foods tend to be
    heavily seasoned/spiced anyway so the cumin is kind of like a musky
    undertone. I'll eat it in chili too but I HATE that the smell lingers in my
    house unless I spray air freshener.

    Slightly off topic, my aunt was on an ethnic kick several decades ago and
    made some beef stirfry with ginger. Apparently she used powdered and
    the lid fell off while she was shaking it into the meat. I kept asking my
    mom why the beef tasted like my dad's speedstick deoderant.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Oh no...lol speedstick deodorant. That's funny!

    Reminds me of a story my MIL told me about my husband. She said when he was little they were at his grandma's and she served shake n bake chicken for dinner. I guess he would not eat it because it tasted like "sandbox chicken" and he told her this too. The things kids say crack me up. Someone should start a thread on that if one hasn't been brought up already.

    Anyway, another spice I don't get is turmeric. It tastes like dirt to me.
  • bloviatrixbloviatrix Posts: 6Registered Users
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Slightly off topic, my aunt was on an ethnic kick several decades ago and
    made some beef stirfry with ginger. Apparently she used powdered and
    the lid fell off while she was shaking it into the meat. I kept asking my
    mom why the beef tasted like my dad's speedstick deoderant.[/QB]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I had a similar thing happen to me. One day as I was making gazpacho, I started to shake the jar of red pepper flakes, only there was no shaker cover on the jar so about 1/4 cup of flakes landed in the bowl. I tried to spoon out whatever I could, and then diluted the gazpacho with more tomatoes. It didn't work - it was hottest gazpacho you've ever tasted. My DH still reminds me of that mistake.
    Hairtype: shoulder-length Botticelli curls
  • SpunkyCurlsSpunkyCurls Posts: 1,523Registered Users
    Wow I will never eat anything with cumin again without thinking of licking armpits...

    cumin is used a lot in mexican dishes and I like the way it smells I dunno how you get sweaty armpits but hey, we all have our things icon_smile.gif my MIL calls it "coom-een" it's so cute icon_biggrin.gif

    I always thought that allspice smelled like Old Spice and so when I was a kid that's what I called it.

    Spunks
    <insert signature line here>

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