Just a few questions about coloring & natural hair..?

xLilQnBxxLilQnBx Registered Users Posts: 12
Soo I don't mean to sound dumb or anything,:happy6: but unfortunately I'm hair-inept. I just have a few questions that will help clear things up for me...

1. Does darker hair generally accentuate the LOOK of curls? It seems that black/dark brown and deep red hair makes curls look soo much prettier & luscious.

2. I havn't had a perm in atleast 3 years. Has my old hair grown out by now?

3. What makes hair "natural hair"?

4. Does flat ironing hair every once in a while [once/twice a month] make your hair NOT natural? Or does having natural hair mean not perming/relaxing/using harsh chemicals?

5. I thought henna was used for tattooing..you can color hair with it?? How does that work? Where can I find it? Does it come in a variety of colors?


Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • CurlyToastCurlyToast Registered Users Posts: 579
    1. That's prolly a matter of opinion -- you could likely find an equal number of people who feel the same about blonde curls.

    2. Depends on how long it was when you were perming it, and how fast your hair grows. i.e. if you had BSL-length hair when you permed it last, 3 years ago, but now it's down to your butt and your hair grows pretty slowly, then you may still have some permed ends remaining. Likewise, if it was chin-length when you last permed it, and now it's down to BSL with a pretty quick growth rate, it may all be grown out and chopped off.

    3. I am under the impression that "natural" in most cases round these here parts implies hair free of perms/relaxers. But I could be wrong, so perhaps someone else will have a better idea.

    4. I wouldn't think that flat ironing affects "natural" designation.

    5. Henna itself comes in one color: red. Different hennas have different dye contents and therefore different depth of red, and everyone's hair will take up the red differently based on natural color, chemical color, and properties. You can add other plants to henna to play around with the color a bit -- adding indigo to the henna paste will give you a darker color, from dark auburn to dark brown, depending on the ratio. Using indigo as a second process will give you black. And amla will yield slightly cooler results, particularly when combined with henna and indigo.

    Basically, you make a mud and wait for dye release. Once that happens, you plaster it on your head, wrap said head in plastic wrap, and live it on anywhere from a few hours to overnight.

    There's loads more info on www.hennaforhair.com.

    :)
  • xLilQnBxxLilQnBx Registered Users Posts: 12
    Thanks! The henna seems a bit too complicated/risky..especially since I'd have no idea what I'm doing. =]
  • SalamanderSalamander Registered Users Posts: 328
    1. As far as darker hair looking better curly, I suspect it is more that lighter colored hair is hard to photograph well -- at least in my experience. When my hair was blond, it always looked just sort of undefined in photos; after I colored it darker the curls showed up much better. It looked fine blond in real life, it just didn't look good in photos. I imagine it has something to do with the way lighter colors reflect light or something -- the same idea as the way bodybuilders get those super-dark fake tans because their muscle definition shows up better than on light skin.

    2. Depends ... have you cut your hair in the past 3 years? How long was it when you permed it, and how long is it now?

    3. You usually hear the term "natural hair" in reference to black hair, i.e., African descent, to distinguish it from hair that has been chemically relaxed or straightened. Though it could certainly apply to hair of any ethnic group that has not been altered by perming or straightening; but I've mostly heard black people refer to hair as "natural."

    4. Flatironing is a temporary straightening, so it doesn't make ones' hair not natural. It can, however, make it damaged.

    5. Henna has been used for thousands of years as a dye. It only comes in one color, which is orangey-red, though you can mix other things into it to get colors ranging from strawberry blond to nearly jet black. All will have some red tones to them. Henna is really good for your hair BUT it is also REALLY permanent so research it VERY THOROUGHLY before using it.
    2a/b right now; 2c when it's longer
    Fine/iii density/high porosity

    Current favorites:
    Suave Naturals Coconut co-wash
    GVP Protein Restructuring Conditioner
    GVP Conditioning Balm
    Eco-Styler, LALSG, BRHG, Garnier Curl Shaping Spray Gel
    ACV rinse 1x per week
  • journey515journey515 Registered Users Posts: 1
    Good evening. My hair is natural and I decided to get a light color for the summer. My stylist used L'Oreal mocha. Then we decided to add a little flair and use bleach to get blonde. But that part didn't go so well. My hair turned out orange. You my natural hair color is redish-brown. A week later, she put a rinse on it that turned it redish-orange. I was in tears. Help...how can i correct it w/o damaging or having to cut my hair? I know have cornrow's with synthetic hair added....do NOT like it!!!

    Thank you
  • CurlyToastCurlyToast Registered Users Posts: 579
    Color correction, unless you're quite comfortable with procedures/product/you hair's general reaction, is typically best left to a professional.

    The "safest" way, if you want to do it yourself, would be to use a demi-permanent color to get you back to a darker shade, closer to what you had before you colored it, or if you're happy with the level of the color (the darkness or lightness of it) but just wish it to be less brassy then you can use an ash-based toner or drabber.

    If you want to go back to your darker color, you would have to select a color with either an ash tone, to neutralize the brassiness if you wanted to return to a medium or dark brown, or a violet tone, if you wanted to return to a brown with a red -- but not orange/brassy -- tone. It should also be about 2 levels lighter than the color you actually wish to achieve, since your hair is probably a bit more porous, from the processing, and demi-perm color frequently pulls darker, at least initially.

    The caveat to all of that, of course, is how comfortable are you with taking the chances inherent to the process (i.e. possibly ending up with another undesirable color), and how damaged is your hair? If you aren't comfortable with the risk, and your hair has been significantly damaged, then I would suggest returning to a professional.

    Also keep in mind, if you do it yourself with a demi-permanent color, brassiness is actually really hard to get rid of, long-term. It's probably more appropriate to consider that you have to manage it. A demi-permanent color will be a bit more inclined to fade than a permanent color (although a permanent color will also fade), and when that happens -- even if you've used an ash toner or drabber -- the underlying color is going to start to influence the new color. The nice thing about demi-permanent color, however, is that it won't lift on new growth and so you won't be continuing the cycle.

    However you look at it, you have to first ask yourself what you want: to correct the tone, or to return to something closer to your natural color.
  • SalamanderSalamander Registered Users Posts: 328
    journey515 wrote: »
    Good evening. My hair is natural and I decided to get a light color for the summer. My stylist used L'Oreal mocha. Then we decided to add a little flair and use bleach to get blonde. But that part didn't go so well. My hair turned out orange. You my natural hair color is redish-brown. A week later, she put a rinse on it that turned it redish-orange. I was in tears. Help...how can i correct it w/o damaging or having to cut my hair? I know have cornrow's with synthetic hair added....do NOT like it!!!

    Thank you

    Hair goes through a series of stages when color is lifted, ranging through orange to yellow-orange to yellow to pale yellow. To get a believable blond tone, you have to lift to the pale yellow stage and then tone over that (the toner is usually violet-based to counteract the yellow-orange color). Depending on how dark your hair is and how much red pigment is in it, you may spend more time in the orange zone.

    So to get past orange, you have to bleach it MORE -- which can be very damaging if you don't know what you are doing. Hence the conventional wisdom that for dark hair going to blond (aka a "double process blond", you need professional help. I would look for a salon that specializes in corrective color, as not all stylists are trained in that area. The fact that your stylist gave you orange hair to begin with leads me to believe that perhaps she is not the best colorist to be working with. To correct the color, a stylist will probably bleach it MORE to get to the pale yellow stage, then tint it with a toner to get to the shade of blond you want. You will have to get it re-toned every few weeks though, or else it will start looking brassy. Those celebrities you see who bleach their naturally dark hair to pale blond usually have it toned WEEKLY to keep it from looking yellowish.

    My hair is naturally light, but I have a lot of red in it. So even though I can lift it to pale blond very easily, it gets brassy at the drop of a hat. If you have dark hair with significant red in your hair to begin with, you may want to reconsider going blond as it it's going to be a lot of upkeep between the roots and the brassiness.

    Now, you can probably color over your bleached hair with a demi-permanent color to get something pretty close to your natural color. The downside is that a demi-permanent color will fade so you will have to re-do it at intervals to counteract the orange resurfacing. However, demi-permanent color is a lot less damaging than permanent, plus it won't change your new growth as it doesn't lift color. To counteract orange, you need a cool shade which will probably be labeled "ash". There are also color additives you can use to reduce red tones -- Sally's has one called UnRed; they are also known as drabbers or mattes.

    I've found that using darker demi-permanent shades covers orange-ness better and also lasts longer. Demi's also fade out gradually so you don't get a harsh line between the dyed and virgin hair.

    You could also do a permanent color but be advised that those fade also, albeit more slowly than a demi. What some people do is color with a permanent color initially, than refresh it with demi-permanent when it starts looking faded/brassy. Permanent color uses a stronger developer, so it will lift whatever color is in your hair and deposit the dye pigment. Thus it is more damaging than a demi-permanent.

    Given that your hair has already been through the bleaching, I would probably go with the demi-permanent as a gentler option.
    2a/b right now; 2c when it's longer
    Fine/iii density/high porosity

    Current favorites:
    Suave Naturals Coconut co-wash
    GVP Protein Restructuring Conditioner
    GVP Conditioning Balm
    Eco-Styler, LALSG, BRHG, Garnier Curl Shaping Spray Gel
    ACV rinse 1x per week
  • DomesticDivaDomesticDiva Registered Users Posts: 2
    My hair is naturally wavy, I wanted to totally make it curly, do you think its a good idea? I am Asian and my nose is not really pointed at all. They say curly hairs only goes well with girls who has pointed nose.

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